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By BETH KEPHART and BETH KEPHART,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2006
The Brooklyn Follies Paul Auster Henry Holt and Co. / 304 pages The thing you want to do this winter - steep snow outside, crackle of wood in the fireplace, the sweet smoke of cocoa spiraling upward from the mug - is to curl up with Paul Auster's newest novel, The Brooklyn Follies. You want to do this for the quality of the writing. You want to do it for the story. You want to do it because it's a Paul Auster book - partly metafictional, partly wry, more than partly full of chance encounters, and blessedly devoid of intellectual prattle.
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NEWS
By BETH KEPHART and BETH KEPHART,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2006
The Brooklyn Follies Paul Auster Henry Holt and Co. / 304 pages The thing you want to do this winter - steep snow outside, crackle of wood in the fireplace, the sweet smoke of cocoa spiraling upward from the mug - is to curl up with Paul Auster's newest novel, The Brooklyn Follies. You want to do this for the quality of the writing. You want to do it for the story. You want to do it because it's a Paul Auster book - partly metafictional, partly wry, more than partly full of chance encounters, and blessedly devoid of intellectual prattle.
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FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1999
BROOKLYN, N.Y. -- The accidental novelist, as a critic once dubbed Paul Auster, sits in his garden on a spring day, insisting he is baffled.He is baffled at the suggestion that identity is a common theme in his novels, even though his characters are always changing names and lives. He is baffled by people who write because they dream of money and glory, although he has ended up earning both. He is baffled that some readers and critics think his latest book, "Timbuktu," is written from a dog's point-of-view, when it's clearly a picaresque novel about love.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeff Danziger and Jeff Danziger,Special to the Sun | June 13, 1999
"Timbuktu," by Paul Auster. Henry Holt & Co. 180 pages. $23.Paul Auster, who first entertained us in the New York trilogy, a trio of odd novellas that were certainly inventive in style and point of view, has, over the last 20 years, written a string of inventive books. He has, as they used to say of John Hersey, never written the same book twice. This is laudatory as long as you provide a story to sustain the changes in style and pacing that result from inventiveness. With Auster, sometimes he does, and sometimes he doesn't.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 7, 1991
A novel by Paul Auster has been named the best book of 1990 by the French literary journal Lire. "Moon Prize," which has been a best seller abroad and was published in the United States last year by Viking, was named No. 1 of 20 top books selected by Lire's editors.Mr. Auster is the second American to receive the honor in the list's 10-year history. His fellow Brooklyn, N.Y., resident, Norman Mailer, won in 1981, for "The Executioner's Song."The decision was announced at a Paris book fair Thursday.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 27, 1995
Here would be the proper way to see "Blue in the Face." You're at the Rotunda. You came to buy new shoes, a book, a Radio Shack computer, flowers, yogurt, something. You call home, and your wife or partner or someone tells you that a certain appointment or plan you had has been canceled. You now have an hour and a half to kill. You look up and note that the movie is playing at the shopping center's little art house, although it started a half-hour ago. What the heck, you think.Here's how not to see "Blue in the Face."
NEWS
By Dave Edelman | December 14, 1992
LEVIATHAN. By Paul Auster. Viking. 275 pages. $21.PAUL Auster is preoccupied with detectives in his popular "New York Trilogy," but it would be wrong to call him a mystery novelist. The hero in Mr. Auster's new book, "Leviathan," is modeled after someone who couldn't be more removed from the gumshoe profession: Henry David Thoreau.Like the famous 19th century rural philosopher, "Leviathan's" protagonist Benjamin Sachs is an alienated intellectual who, we learn, once went to jail for protesting the Vietnam War. Sachs' story is conveyed through his friend Peter Aaron (note the initials)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeff Danziger and Jeff Danziger,Special to the Sun | June 13, 1999
"Timbuktu," by Paul Auster. Henry Holt & Co. 180 pages. $23.Paul Auster, who first entertained us in the New York trilogy, a trio of odd novellas that were certainly inventive in style and point of view, has, over the last 20 years, written a string of inventive books. He has, as they used to say of John Hersey, never written the same book twice. This is laudatory as long as you provide a story to sustain the changes in style and pacing that result from inventiveness. With Auster, sometimes he does, and sometimes he doesn't.
NEWS
By Joseph Coates and Joseph Coates,Chicago Tribune | February 21, 1993
THE ART OF HUNGER: ESSAYS,PREFACES, INTERVIEWS.Paul Auster.Sun & Moon Press.! 312 pages. $24.95As a title, "The Art of Hunger" applies to much more than the leadoff essay on the odd first novel called "Hunger," published in 1890 by Knut Hamsun -- a work so idiosyncratic that in its pages, says American novelist Paul Auster, Mr. Hamsun "walks straight into the twentieth century" and into an artistic challenge most serious writers face a century later.This...
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | February 13, 1991
"The Music of Chance," by Paul Auster, 217 pages, Viking Penguin Inc., New York, N.Y., $18.95.IN PAUL Auster's novel "The Music of Chance," his protagonist Jim Nashe has achieved one of the great American dreams: total, aimless, irresponsible mobility. Then, on one turn of a card, he is cast into absolute, stony, immobile subjugation.In a novel driven by coincidence -- and an omnipotent, manipulative narrator -- Jim Nashe does indeed dance to the music of chance. He's fallen into the hands of blind fate, and a crafty and ambitious author, and at the end meets his death with his eyes closed.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1999
BROOKLYN, N.Y. -- The accidental novelist, as a critic once dubbed Paul Auster, sits in his garden on a spring day, insisting he is baffled.He is baffled at the suggestion that identity is a common theme in his novels, even though his characters are always changing names and lives. He is baffled by people who write because they dream of money and glory, although he has ended up earning both. He is baffled that some readers and critics think his latest book, "Timbuktu," is written from a dog's point-of-view, when it's clearly a picaresque novel about love.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 27, 1995
Here would be the proper way to see "Blue in the Face." You're at the Rotunda. You came to buy new shoes, a book, a Radio Shack computer, flowers, yogurt, something. You call home, and your wife or partner or someone tells you that a certain appointment or plan you had has been canceled. You now have an hour and a half to kill. You look up and note that the movie is playing at the shopping center's little art house, although it started a half-hour ago. What the heck, you think.Here's how not to see "Blue in the Face."
NEWS
By Joseph Coates and Joseph Coates,Chicago Tribune | February 21, 1993
THE ART OF HUNGER: ESSAYS,PREFACES, INTERVIEWS.Paul Auster.Sun & Moon Press.! 312 pages. $24.95As a title, "The Art of Hunger" applies to much more than the leadoff essay on the odd first novel called "Hunger," published in 1890 by Knut Hamsun -- a work so idiosyncratic that in its pages, says American novelist Paul Auster, Mr. Hamsun "walks straight into the twentieth century" and into an artistic challenge most serious writers face a century later.This...
NEWS
By Dave Edelman | December 14, 1992
LEVIATHAN. By Paul Auster. Viking. 275 pages. $21.PAUL Auster is preoccupied with detectives in his popular "New York Trilogy," but it would be wrong to call him a mystery novelist. The hero in Mr. Auster's new book, "Leviathan," is modeled after someone who couldn't be more removed from the gumshoe profession: Henry David Thoreau.Like the famous 19th century rural philosopher, "Leviathan's" protagonist Benjamin Sachs is an alienated intellectual who, we learn, once went to jail for protesting the Vietnam War. Sachs' story is conveyed through his friend Peter Aaron (note the initials)
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | February 13, 1991
"The Music of Chance," by Paul Auster, 217 pages, Viking Penguin Inc., New York, N.Y., $18.95.IN PAUL Auster's novel "The Music of Chance," his protagonist Jim Nashe has achieved one of the great American dreams: total, aimless, irresponsible mobility. Then, on one turn of a card, he is cast into absolute, stony, immobile subjugation.In a novel driven by coincidence -- and an omnipotent, manipulative narrator -- Jim Nashe does indeed dance to the music of chance. He's fallen into the hands of blind fate, and a crafty and ambitious author, and at the end meets his death with his eyes closed.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 7, 1991
A novel by Paul Auster has been named the best book of 1990 by the French literary journal Lire. "Moon Prize," which has been a best seller abroad and was published in the United States last year by Viking, was named No. 1 of 20 top books selected by Lire's editors.Mr. Auster is the second American to receive the honor in the list's 10-year history. His fellow Brooklyn, N.Y., resident, Norman Mailer, won in 1981, for "The Executioner's Song."The decision was announced at a Paris book fair Thursday.
NEWS
December 3, 2006
The Brooklyn Follies By Paul AusterThe thing you want to do this winter ... is to curl up with this Auster novel. You want to do this for the quality of the writing. You want to do it for the story. You want to do it because it's a Paul Auster book - partly metafictional, partly wry, more than partly full of chance encounters, and blessedly devoid of intellectual prattle.
FEATURES
April 5, 2000
Donny Osmond sings the title role in "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat," the musical adaptation of the biblical tale from Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice. Continuing in this "PBS Showcase" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) is Lloyd Webber's "Requiem" with Placido Domingo. PBS. At a glance "The West Wing" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- An arrest at a frat party could pose problems for the president's daughter; the staff celebrates the confirmation of their Supreme Court nominee.
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