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NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | November 5, 1990
State prison officials say they are trying to determine if there had been a romance that caused a male officer at the Patuxent Institution to fatally shoot a female co-worker before turning the gun on himself.Shortly before 8 a.m. yesterday, Lt. Eugene Kenneth Davis, 37, walked into a building at the medium-security prison in Jessup, went downstairs to the basement and confronted Lt. Vivian Zina Anderson, 38, said Greg Shipley, a state prison spokesman."He used a .38-caliber and shot her in the head and then turned the gun on himself and shot himself in the head," said Shipley.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Staff Writer | October 15, 1993
Patuxent Institution's director will meet with the citizens advisory board for eight Jessup prisons Thursday to discuss how to inform residents about the release of prison inmates.Joseph Henneberry, Patuxent's top official, said he would be willing to give names of inmates about to be released from his institution to members of the Citizens' Advisory Board for Correctional Institutions, Jessup.Also scheduled to attend the meeting are the warden of Patuxent and the wardens of Jessup's seven other prisons.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun Reporter | July 15, 2008
It's the kind of theft that Cindy McKay knows well. Except this time, investigators say, she is the victim. An employee in the state prison system's finance department is set to go to trial next month in Howard County for allegedly forging the endorsement on a check made out to McKay, a serial swindler who will be sentenced tomorrow after pleading guilty to murder. CherRon Nichole Johnson, 36, was charged last month with cashing a $426 state income tax refund check intended for McKay, a 52-year-old inmate at the Maryland Correctional Institute for Women who has been convicted more than a dozen times for theft and embezzlement and was the focus of a three-part series in The Sun this year.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1999
Facing a potentially contentious legislative hearing, prison officials announced disciplinary action yesterday against four more corrections officers whose negligence contributed to the recent escape of two inmates from a Jessup prison.The firing of another guard, the demotion of a captain to lieutenant and written reprimands of a major and another corrections officer complete the internal disciplinary review at the Maryland Correctional Institution, officials said.That brought to nine the number of officers disciplined or transferred as a result of the May 18 escape.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Staff Writer | October 22, 1993
Wardens and other representatives of five of the eight Jessup-area state prisons told a local citizen board last night that they would inform it when convicts -- particularly sex offenders -- are released into the community.But the officials said that they were concerned that announcing the release of every inmate convicted of a serious crime could place residents in a perpetual state of fear. And if the community knows the name of the person freed, that could put the freed convict in danger, they said.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | December 17, 2009
A Glen Burnie teenager found playing a videogame at home the day after killing his mother and leaving her body in her bedroom pleaded guilty Thursday to first-degree murder. William Joseph Skiratko, 18, stood motionless while relatives watched silently as he admitted to Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Pamela L. North that he fatally stabbed Elizabeth Anne Skiratko, 45. Conditions of the plea include a recommendation that Skiratko be evaluated for treatment in the youthful offender program of Patuxent Institution.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
The inmates' requests often start small, former corrections officers say: a ballpoint pen, for example, or a sandwich from beyond the prison walls. "You may think it's insignificant," said former Cpl. Sheila Hill, who retired last year from the Patuxent Institution in Jessup. "But it's not. " Even small gifts cross the clear line that should be drawn between inmates and officers, Hill and others said Tuesday. It's a line that federal officials say was flagrantly broken at the Baltimore City Detention Center.
NEWS
September 13, 2000
Effective prisons can make a difference in inmates' lives Gregory Kane recently acknowledged two restorative justice programs at the Patuxent Institution: the Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund walk-a-thon and the "Reasoned Straight" program ("Inmates' fund-raiser offers a break from stereotype," Sept. 3). On behalf of the institution, I thank Mr. Kane for calling attention to the inmates' efforts. I would also note that these are not our inmates' only efforts to give back to the community.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2002
Two by two the young men, shackled only by fear, walked the moonlight path from freedom into the walls of Patuxent Institution. They weren't prisoners, but some of these youngsters from Anne Arundel County acknowledged that they could be someday. "I'm just screwing up in school, and I don't really care," said Bryan Imhoff, 14, of Linthicum. "I'm here to try to stop what I'm doing now so I don't end up back in here." As part of a 23-year-old program called Reasoned Straight, Imhoff and 16 other Anne Arundel County boys, mostly in their early teens, got an inside peek one evening last week at a maximum-security prison - and at what can happen if they choose a life of crime.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin | January 7, 1991
The caretaker-gravedigger of Holy Cross Cemetery, fired from his job of nearly four years by a Roman Catholic priest shortly before Christmas, has been ordered to vacate the large frame house on the cemetery property where he lives with his wife and seven children.Although the caretaker, 51-year-old William F. Storey, was told to have his family out of the house by today, the order was delayed by an official of the Baltimore archdiocese this weekend following complaints about Mr. Storey's firing and eviction by the family and by neighbors of the cemetery off the 6000 block of Ritchie Highway on the edge of Brooklyn Park.
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