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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | November 11, 1990
There is something irresistible about "Call Me Anna," the video biography of Patty Duke, which airs at 9 tonight on WJZ-TV (Channel 13).It is not that the made-for-TV movie is a great production. Though the film does offer three fine performances by the actresses playing Duke (including Duke herself), it is a fairly uneven ride that dips dangerously close to trash-o-rama a couple of times.What makes "Call Me Anna" irresistible is its subject matter and the public or shared media history that television has created for us over the last 40 years.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 11, 2008
A movie that cuts closer to the soul of U.S. politics than most of us would like to admit, Robert Rossen's 1949 All the King's Men (TCM at 4 p.m.) follows the tempestuous career of Louisiana Gov. Will Stark (Broderick Crawford), who exploits his populist roots into a career that makes him just short of royalty. As much Shakespearean tragedy as cautionary tale, the Best Picture Oscar winner features an extraordinary and Oscar-winning star turn from Crawford, whose limited acting range (he was great at bluster, but not all that much else)
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 11, 2008
A movie that cuts closer to the soul of U.S. politics than most of us would like to admit, Robert Rossen's 1949 All the King's Men (TCM at 4 p.m.) follows the tempestuous career of Louisiana Gov. Will Stark (Broderick Crawford), who exploits his populist roots into a career that makes him just short of royalty. As much Shakespearean tragedy as cautionary tale, the Best Picture Oscar winner features an extraordinary and Oscar-winning star turn from Crawford, whose limited acting range (he was great at bluster, but not all that much else)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 27, 1999
Up until this weekend, I thought "Return to Green Acres" -- featuring Arnold Ziffel, the pig, in a greatly expanded role -- was the worst made-for-TV reunion movie I was likely to see in my lifetime. And, then, I saw "The Patty Duke Show: Still Rockin' in Brooklyn Heights," which airs at 9 tonight on CBS. Why? Why, why, why, why, why did they have to take this tasty, fondly remembered nugget from television's past and grind it into one more gaseous piece of prime-time sausage in 1999?
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April 2, 1999
David Spade of "Just Shoot Me" tells Playboy that late comedian and best friend Chris Farley always seemed vulnerable to tragedy. "Of our group -- Chris Rock, Adam Sandler, me, Chris -- we all knew Farley was the funniest," Spade says. "He had so many different ways of being funny that we didn't. He was always bigger and goofier and more committed than any of us. But, Farley was the one we thought something might happen to -- like a guy walking through heavy traffic. It was nerve-racking.
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By Bruce Christian and Bruce Christian,Cox News Service | November 9, 1990
Pity poor Patty Duke. Her name really is Anna, but she can't get anyone to call her that.She's written an autobiography asking people to "Call Me Anna." It didn't work. Everyone still calls her Patty.Now ABC has taken the autobiography and made it into a TV movie.Watching it, I felt like a voyeur.The actress is uncompromising when it comes to exposing herself. Tear away all the glitz and glamour of being a major Hollywood star, and you get a naked, vulnerable woman who has had major problems.
NEWS
By Edward John Hudak | June 25, 1991
THE FIRST TIME I saw the 1946 film, "The Best Years of Ou Lives," I thought that Harold Russell was one hell of an actor. I kept saying to myself, "Wow! This guy plays a double-arm amputee like the real McCoy. I wonder how long it took him to learn how to use those hooks?"Well, it wasn't long before I found out that it took Harold Russell about as long as it takes any ex-GI who lost both arms in World War II to get used to his prostheses because he was the real McCoy. Director William Wyler hired Russell for the part of a disabled veteran, hooks and all.Many years later, when I saw Daniel Day-Lewis portray the late Irish writer Christy Brown in "My Left Foot," I said to myself, "Wow!
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | September 7, 1997
Steve Gillilan will talk about his experiences as an actor, writer, director and producer at Thursday's open membership meeting of Women in Film & Video of Maryland.Gillilan, a Baltimore native and a graduate of Boston University's theater department, is the writer and director of the coming films "The Jealous God" and "Patty Stone." He appeared on the soap opera "One Life to Live" in 1988 as Jason, the preppy drug dealer.Gillilan starred in films and plays and has written many screenplays, including "The Last American Cab Driver" and "Mad for Thy Love," which were both inspired by life experiences.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 27, 1999
Up until this weekend, I thought "Return to Green Acres" -- featuring Arnold Ziffel, the pig, in a greatly expanded role -- was the worst made-for-TV reunion movie I was likely to see in my lifetime. And, then, I saw "The Patty Duke Show: Still Rockin' in Brooklyn Heights," which airs at 9 tonight on CBS. Why? Why, why, why, why, why did they have to take this tasty, fondly remembered nugget from television's past and grind it into one more gaseous piece of prime-time sausage in 1999?
FEATURES
December 14, 2005
1. BRIAN BEDDER : GETTY IMAGES 1. Anthony Hamilton 2. Actress Patty Duke Today's birthdays Jazz musician Clark Terry, 85 -- Former `60 Minutes' executive producer Don Hewitt, 83 -- Actress Patty Duke, (above) 59 -- Rock musician Cliff Williams of AC/DC, 56 -- Actress Cynthia Gibb, 42 -- Anthony Hamilton Said It "I've carved out a little niche for myself. I knew that I wanted to touch people in the mainstream, but in a way that's not so obvious." R&B singer Anthony Hamilton, who has found success de spite not being trendy or pres enting himself as a sex symbol.
FEATURES
April 2, 1999
David Spade of "Just Shoot Me" tells Playboy that late comedian and best friend Chris Farley always seemed vulnerable to tragedy. "Of our group -- Chris Rock, Adam Sandler, me, Chris -- we all knew Farley was the funniest," Spade says. "He had so many different ways of being funny that we didn't. He was always bigger and goofier and more committed than any of us. But, Farley was the one we thought something might happen to -- like a guy walking through heavy traffic. It was nerve-racking.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | September 7, 1997
Steve Gillilan will talk about his experiences as an actor, writer, director and producer at Thursday's open membership meeting of Women in Film & Video of Maryland.Gillilan, a Baltimore native and a graduate of Boston University's theater department, is the writer and director of the coming films "The Jealous God" and "Patty Stone." He appeared on the soap opera "One Life to Live" in 1988 as Jason, the preppy drug dealer.Gillilan starred in films and plays and has written many screenplays, including "The Last American Cab Driver" and "Mad for Thy Love," which were both inspired by life experiences.
NEWS
By Edward John Hudak | June 25, 1991
THE FIRST TIME I saw the 1946 film, "The Best Years of Ou Lives," I thought that Harold Russell was one hell of an actor. I kept saying to myself, "Wow! This guy plays a double-arm amputee like the real McCoy. I wonder how long it took him to learn how to use those hooks?"Well, it wasn't long before I found out that it took Harold Russell about as long as it takes any ex-GI who lost both arms in World War II to get used to his prostheses because he was the real McCoy. Director William Wyler hired Russell for the part of a disabled veteran, hooks and all.Many years later, when I saw Daniel Day-Lewis portray the late Irish writer Christy Brown in "My Left Foot," I said to myself, "Wow!
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | November 11, 1990
There is something irresistible about "Call Me Anna," the video biography of Patty Duke, which airs at 9 tonight on WJZ-TV (Channel 13).It is not that the made-for-TV movie is a great production. Though the film does offer three fine performances by the actresses playing Duke (including Duke herself), it is a fairly uneven ride that dips dangerously close to trash-o-rama a couple of times.What makes "Call Me Anna" irresistible is its subject matter and the public or shared media history that television has created for us over the last 40 years.
FEATURES
By Bruce Christian and Bruce Christian,Cox News Service | November 9, 1990
Pity poor Patty Duke. Her name really is Anna, but she can't get anyone to call her that.She's written an autobiography asking people to "Call Me Anna." It didn't work. Everyone still calls her Patty.Now ABC has taken the autobiography and made it into a TV movie.Watching it, I felt like a voyeur.The actress is uncompromising when it comes to exposing herself. Tear away all the glitz and glamour of being a major Hollywood star, and you get a naked, vulnerable woman who has had major problems.
NEWS
September 29, 1999
Howard County Executive James N. Robey will unveil a bronze plaque honoring Howard County residents with mental illness and proclaim Mental Illness Awareness Week in the county at 10 a.m. Friday at the George Howard Building, 3430 Court House Drive in Ellicott City. The plaque displays the names of 24 artists, scientists and political figures who suffered from mental illness, including Abraham Lincoln, John Keats, Isaac Newton, Winston Churchill, Charles Dickens and Patty Duke.
NEWS
September 29, 1999
Howard County Executive James N. Robey will unveil a bronze plaque honoring Howard County residents with mental illness and proclaim Mental Illness Awareness Week in the county at 10 a.m. Friday at the George Howard Building, 3430 Court House Drive, Ellicott City.The plaque displays the names of 24 artists, scientists and political figures who suffered from mental illness -- among them, Abraham Lincoln, John Keats, Isaac Newton, Winston Churchill, Patty Duke and Charles Dickens.It has been placed in the Iris Garden in the plaza in front of the building, where the ceremony will take place.
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