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NEWS
July 29, 2013
I was surprised that Maryland's top court chose to continue protection of bars that serve intoxicated patrons who cause accidents after leaving their establishments. In most states, courts hear such cases and attribute responsibility proportionately to the bar server/establishment and the patron causing damages. This approach provides sensible shared responsibility. The Maryland court has indicated, as reported in the Baltimore Sun, that the matter rests solely with public policy in the legislative domain.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kym Byrnes, For The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
If a bus-sized iron asteroid traveling at approximately 12 miles per second hit New York City, would Baltimore be spared? The answer to this and other space questions can be found in Discover Space, an interactive learning exhibit on display at the Baltimore County Public Library's Towson branch through Oct. 29. Lisa Hughes, manager of the branch on York Road, said the exhibit will appeal to patrons from elementary aged kids to seniors....
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | February 17, 1992
They were lined up 10 deep in Towson yesterday, but not to buy tickets to an Oriole game or a rock concert.Patrons were patiently waiting to check out armloads of books at Baltimore County's Towson branch library, which has seen a 250 percent increase in Sunday circulation as a result of cuts in service elsewhere."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Elizabeth C. Bellavance, an educator, social activist, and patron of the academic and arts communities who was also an outspoken advocate for the Eastern Shore's Hispanic community, died July 24 of cancer at Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in Richmond, Va. She was 77. "Liz was an extraordinary, extraordinary woman. I used to call her the Grand Dame of the Eastern Shore," said Kim Propeack, a lawyer who is the political and communications director for Casa de Maryland.
NEWS
By Laurie Schwartz | June 8, 1998
TWO FIERCELY committed groups are voicing conflicting positions on the possible relocation of Our Daily Bread, a downtown Baltimore soup kitchen operated by Associated Catholic Charities. This is an issue that has long needed resolution, but common ground is possible.Everyone agrees that Our Daily Bread serves a vital need in the community and that Associated Catholic Charities has served that need well. They feed about 900 patrons each day.But the surrounding community also has needs. It is time to re-evaluate how the needs of those who use Our Daily Bread and the needs of those who visit or live nearby are being served.
NEWS
By Michael Scarcella and Michael Scarcella,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2001
Christopher Wool's stark painting featuring the word terrorist has been removed from the Baltimore Museum of Art's contemporary wing because patrons complained that the piece was "disturbing," a museum security guard said yesterday. The painting - which displays in three lines "TER," "ROR," and "IST" in stenciled, black lettering - was taken down Friday morning before the museum's 11 a.m. opening. The museum made no public announcement of the work's removal and there is no printed explanation at its former location to explain why it was removed.
NEWS
By KIMBERLY MARSELAS and KIMBERLY MARSELAS,Special to The Sun | March 23, 2007
They may be great fodder for an episode of Seinfeld, but long-overdue books and mounting fines are no laughing matter to Anne Arundel County librarians. Starting Monday, the library system will begin referring accounts with more than $35 due to a collection agency that specializes in bringing in revenue and recovering outstanding books, movies and other materials. "We've done just about everything that we can do on our end with the staff and the resources that we have," said library spokeswoman Laurie Hayes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By sam sessa | April 5, 2007
Consider it the end of a chapter for Baltimore's gay scene. This weekend, Gallagher's, a lesbian-friendly bar located where Canton meets Brewer's Hill, will close for good. The last hurrah will be Saturday night. Gallagher's lease is up, and owners Vera Mosley and Sue Webster want out. Mosley wants to focus on her real-estate business, and Webster is not sure where she'll end up just yet. On Saturday, they're going to send the place off right. "We're going to party as hard as we can," Webster said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 23, 2000
Moved by patrons' complaints, U.S. Postal Service officials have scheduled a second public meeting April 27 to discuss moving the west Columbia post office from the Town Center lakefront to The Mall at Columbia nearby. "What we heard is that folks didn't feel there was adequate notice," said David Lewin, spokesman for the post office. The next meeting will be held at 6 p.m. at the main Columbia post office on Oak Hall Lane off Oakland Mills Road in east Columbia. Nine people attended a meeting there Tuesday night to voice complaints about the planned move, but several also said they received late notice of the meeting or learned about it by accident.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1996
Even in the face of possible danger from unruly patrons and the mean streets, crowds of young women flock to Volcano's on Wednesday nights, eager to chase away the boredom of midweek and to eye the male strippers that perform there.And as has happened before, this week revelry gave way to tragedy as two college students were gunned down in a explosive display of violence. To those familiar with the club, though, such mayhem is a result of a few troublemakers and the crime-ridden area that surrounds the nightspot.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
I have loved horse racing for 60 years and have been a thoroughbred horse owner off and on since 1985. It is because I love the industry and want to see it thrive that I must write that while the owners of California Chrome felt they were treated better at Pimlico than at Churchill Downs, the management of Pimlico and Laurel race courses should take a hard look at improving service to their customers if they are to grow and frankly, survive ( ...
NEWS
Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Hookah lounge owners in Baltimore County told the County Council on Tuesday that proposed legislation to make them close earlier would put them out of business. Council members are weighing a proposal by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz that would require the lounges to close at 8 p.m. on weeknights and 9 p.m. on weekends, restrictions Kamenetz says would prevent neighborhood disruptions and curb illegal activity. At a Tuesday work session, the council heard from business owners who said they are being unfairly targeted and from residents who say lounge patrons wreak havoc in their neighborhoods.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
For the last few weeks, the future of The Brewer's Art's Ozzy beer has been in question because of a recent cease-and-desist letter from representatives of rock singer Ozzy Osbourne. Finally, co-owner Tom Creegan put the rumors to rest on Wednesday afternoon. "We have agreed to change the name and packaging for the beer formerly known as Ozzy," Creegan said. He declined to elaborate further on the situation between Osbourne's camp and the beer company, but confirmed only the name and packaging were changing - not the recipe.  The Brewer's Art is asking patrons for help in naming the soon-to-be-rebranded beer.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2014
A sure sign of spring in Baltimore are the containers of greens under the Jones Falls Expressway, and the throngs of people queuing up to buy them. The city's 37th annual Sunday Farmers' Market & Bazaar opened Sunday at 7 a.m., and a few thousand turned out. "I think a lot of people were really excited that it reopened," said Mitch Case, a spokesman for the market, which is run by the city's Office of Promotion & the Arts. "It was sunny and the weather certainly helped. " The market generally draws 5,000-8,000 on summer days, he said, when all the crops are grown and available.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
Marion C. Cohen, a former Roland Park resident and patron of the arts who was a granddaughter of President Grover Cleveland, died Feb. 21 at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, N.H., of complications from a fall. She was 87. The daughter of Francis Grover Cleveland, an actor, and Alice Pardee Erdman Cleveland, a homemaker, Marion Cleveland was born in Belmont, Mass., and raised in New York City. In addition to President Cleveland, she was the granddaughter of first lady Frances Folsom Cleveland.
NEWS
March 1, 2014
Loyola University freshman Alison Breitenbach and her 14-year-old brother recently received a surprise from a kind stranger. Alison, 19, and her brother, Jack, a freshman in high school, had a long chat over a late breakfast at Miss Shirley's on Cold Spring Lane on Feb. 21. "We were just catching up," said Alison. "I hadn't seen my brother since winter break. It's kind of weird for me not to be there while he's in high school. " The siblings' mother, Laura Breitenbach, had a meeting in Washington and had dropped Jack off to spend the night in Alison's dorm.
NEWS
January 27, 1991
State police said yesterday that they were looking for four armed men who burst into a Charles County tavern late Friday night, robbed four customers and shot one of them when he attempted to flee.Just before midnight, the four men, brandishing handguns, entered Toyes Inn on Route 231 in Benedict and ordered four patrons to stand against a wall, according to state police at Waldorf.After taking coats, wallets and jewelry from the patrons, the assailants told them to move to the rear of the tavern.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 4, 1994
PHILADELPHIA -- At least 38 people were injured early yesterday when a taxicab plunged through the glass front wall of a crowded riverfront-area nightclub celebrating its grand opening, police said.A Cherry Hill, N.J., man said he was on the dance floor about 12:45 a.m. when the cab seemed to "explode" into the private Club Deco at Front and Spring Garden streets. He said that people were hurled into the air and that at least one person was pinned under the cab.The injured were taken from the club and rushed to Hahnemann University Hospital, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Temple University Hospital, and Frankford Hospital Torresdale Campus.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
Baltimore County police were called early Saturday to the Torrent Lounge in Towson, which opened Friday, after someone discharged pepper spray inside, causing some patrons to cough and vomit. Officers were called at 12:44 a.m. to the nightclub in the 500 block of York Road for a disturbance. Police said a customer discharged a can of pepper spray inside the club. A medic unit also responded, but police officials said no one was taken to the hospital. Police issued one man a citation for disorderly conduct after he got into a fight with other patrons over who discharged the spray.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
A panel of advisers to an established senior center on the edge of Mount Vernon is protesting a proposal to lease space in its city-owned building to Baltimore's gay community center. The Waxter Center Advisory Council fears younger patrons of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore could disturb older patrons of the building's senior center, which has been in operation for nearly 40 years, said Lester Buster, president of the advisory council. "We just don't know whether or not that will be a good mix," said Buster, 79, of West Baltimore.
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