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By James Drew and James Drew,Sun reporter | August 18, 2008
Hours before people jammed the streets, sipping Italian iced tea and devouring fried dough on a perfect day for a festival, there was Dominic Pompa carrying the 92-year-old banner of St. Gabriel of the Sorrowful Mother through the quiet streets of Little Italy. After Mass yesterday morning at St. Leo Roman Catholic Church, Pompa and about 25 others marched through the neighborhood as about 50 spectators followed. Residents came out of their homes to watch. Boys dressed in robes and girls as angels walked in front of St. Gabriel's statue, carried by four men. After the singing of the U.S. and Italian national anthems, the festival began.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore sun | March 1, 2014
March has not yet brought spring, with the Mid-Atlantic cowering under a fresh White Doom From Above warning for tomorrow and Monday, but already the mangling of the name of the patron saint of Ireland is well advanced.  Every year on Twitter, @paddynotpatty undertakes the Sisyphean labor of demonstrating to multitudes apparently impaired by drink that the diminutive of the saint's name is Paddy , not Patty , having derived from...
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FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 21, 1998
Twenty-nine years after St. Christopher's demotion among the legion of Catholic saints, he's still standing tall.The traditional patron saint of travelers has even picked up some new work. He's become the unofficial patron saint of - student sports."The new thing is St. Christopher as a sports protector - soccer, hockey, baseball, basketball. We're selling a lot of those medals," says Dennis Klotz,general manager of the Catholic Bookstore in Detroit.Sales are so hot, "I can't keep the hockey medals in stock," says Pat Darichuk, buyer for December's Special Place gift shop in Southgate, a Detroit suburb.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  TAWDRY You probably know that tawdry  (pronounced TAW-dree) means "showy," "gaudy," "without real value," "cheaply adorned. " And you probably extend the sense from too much costume jewelry and makeup to a moral level of cheapness and shallowness.  But you may not know that the word comes from a saint's name.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Gaines and Judith Gaines,Boston Globe | March 20, 2000
Oasta eaters have their own patron saint. So do tax collectors, beggars, seekers of lost articles, supporters of lost causes, students, people with sore throats or troubled marriages. St. Giles guides the disabled, St. Expedito aids the procrastinator, St. Raphael will get a friendship back on track. But cyberspace, so far, is saintless. Now, as more people spend more time surfing the captivating but sometimes soulless ocean of information on the World Wide Web, there's a movement under way urging the Vatican to name a patron saint of the Internet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Newsday | July 31, 2003
What kills a TV show faster than a bad review? According to the cult Web site jumpthe shark.com, it's adding Ted McGinley to the cast. This uber-handsome actor serves as "our patron saint" at the online gathering place devoted to defining that moment "when you know your favorite program has reached its peak" and "from now on, it's all downhill." Shark-sighters note McGinley joins shows just as they're deteriorating -- Happy Days, The Love Boat, Married ... With Children and, most recently, Nathan Lane's June CBS debacle Charlie Lawrence.
NEWS
January 8, 2006
1783: Masons lodge offcially installed 1783 was an eventful and auspicious year in Annapolis, the fledging republic's capital and the place where Gen. George Washington resigned his commission. At the year's onset, Masonic activities took on grander heights in the city that prided itself on gentility in men's political, social and commercial associations. In January, the Lodge of Ancient York Masons was officially installed at its lodge room in Annapolis by the authority of Peregrine Letherbury, Esq. The grandmaster of Maryland and others assembled to celebrate St. John the Evangelist, the patron saint of Freemasonry, at the house of Vachel Stevens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carol Eisenberg and Carol Eisenberg,NEWSDAY | December 28, 2003
Beleaguered by spam, some people might feel helpless or overwhelmed. Not the Rev. Peter Paul Brennan, who looks heavenward for deliverance from such earthly irritations. Brennan, of West Hempstead, N.Y., says he seeks guidance and intercession from St. Isidore of Seville, a sixth century prelate who wrote a 20-volume encyclopedia of civilization - really, Brennan says, the first database of knowledge ever compiled. Who better, Brennan asks, to be patron saint of the Internet than this pioneering Spanish cataloguer?
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  TAWDRY You probably know that tawdry  (pronounced TAW-dree) means "showy," "gaudy," "without real value," "cheaply adorned. " And you probably extend the sense from too much costume jewelry and makeup to a moral level of cheapness and shallowness.  But you may not know that the word comes from a saint's name.
SPORTS
By GARY SHELTON and GARY SHELTON,St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times | January 15, 2007
NEW ORLEANS -- Somewhere in the upper reaches of the sanctuary known as the Superdome, the noise began not as a cheer so much as a primal scream of approval. It built slowly, louder and stronger, tumbling through the bleachers on its way to the field. There was relief in the sound, and joy and celebration and gratitude for the escape of the moment. It swirled around the building, ebullient, and by the time it reached full volume, the pain had been blocked out. The Saints were playing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
At the age of 16, a French villager named Jeanne d'Arc responded to what she said were the voices of saints, exhorting her to take up arms against English invaders. Dressed in male clothing, she led troops to victory in battle after battle before being captured when she was 19. Jeanne heard voices again soon enough, but these were decidedly human ones, some mocking her and others praying for her as she slowly burned to death at the stake during a brutal execution carried out 580 years ago. This week, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra presents its first performance of a 1938 oratorio commemorating the woman whose faith, vision and bravery would eventually earn her sainthood.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2011
For years, St. Paul's Cemetery, a Victorian city of the dead on a knoll in a remote corner of Druid Hill Park, was nothing more than a nearly forgotten, weed-choked, overgrown burial ground that had been subjected to mindless vandalism through the decades. Today, it's brimming with new life as volunteers and members of Martini Lutheran Church man humming lawn mowers and screaming chainsaws as they cut grass and remove felled trees. Their common goal is to restore the cemetery, which dates to 1854, to its former glory.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 15, 2011
Sister Mary Ferdinand Tunis, a Sister of Mercy who taught parochial school mathematics before establishing the Sisters of Mercy Windsor Hills Project in the early 1970s, died June 7 of pneumonia at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 91 and had lived for the past 15 years at The Villa, a retirement community that her order shares with the Mission Helpers of the Sacred Heart in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. Jane Hansel Tunis was born in Baltimore and raised in the 4500 block of Prospect Circle in Windsor Hills, the Southwest Baltimore neighborhood that would come to play a major role in her life.
NEWS
By James Drew and James Drew,Sun reporter | August 18, 2008
Hours before people jammed the streets, sipping Italian iced tea and devouring fried dough on a perfect day for a festival, there was Dominic Pompa carrying the 92-year-old banner of St. Gabriel of the Sorrowful Mother through the quiet streets of Little Italy. After Mass yesterday morning at St. Leo Roman Catholic Church, Pompa and about 25 others marched through the neighborhood as about 50 spectators followed. Residents came out of their homes to watch. Boys dressed in robes and girls as angels walked in front of St. Gabriel's statue, carried by four men. After the singing of the U.S. and Italian national anthems, the festival began.
SPORTS
By GARY SHELTON and GARY SHELTON,St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times | January 15, 2007
NEW ORLEANS -- Somewhere in the upper reaches of the sanctuary known as the Superdome, the noise began not as a cheer so much as a primal scream of approval. It built slowly, louder and stronger, tumbling through the bleachers on its way to the field. There was relief in the sound, and joy and celebration and gratitude for the escape of the moment. It swirled around the building, ebullient, and by the time it reached full volume, the pain had been blocked out. The Saints were playing.
NEWS
January 8, 2006
1783: Masons lodge offcially installed 1783 was an eventful and auspicious year in Annapolis, the fledging republic's capital and the place where Gen. George Washington resigned his commission. At the year's onset, Masonic activities took on grander heights in the city that prided itself on gentility in men's political, social and commercial associations. In January, the Lodge of Ancient York Masons was officially installed at its lodge room in Annapolis by the authority of Peregrine Letherbury, Esq. The grandmaster of Maryland and others assembled to celebrate St. John the Evangelist, the patron saint of Freemasonry, at the house of Vachel Stevens.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore sun | March 1, 2014
March has not yet brought spring, with the Mid-Atlantic cowering under a fresh White Doom From Above warning for tomorrow and Monday, but already the mangling of the name of the patron saint of Ireland is well advanced.  Every year on Twitter, @paddynotpatty undertakes the Sisyphean labor of demonstrating to multitudes apparently impaired by drink that the diminutive of the saint's name is Paddy , not Patty , having derived from...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 15, 2011
Sister Mary Ferdinand Tunis, a Sister of Mercy who taught parochial school mathematics before establishing the Sisters of Mercy Windsor Hills Project in the early 1970s, died June 7 of pneumonia at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 91 and had lived for the past 15 years at The Villa, a retirement community that her order shares with the Mission Helpers of the Sacred Heart in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. Jane Hansel Tunis was born in Baltimore and raised in the 4500 block of Prospect Circle in Windsor Hills, the Southwest Baltimore neighborhood that would come to play a major role in her life.
NEWS
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
When parishioners gather at St. Ignatius Roman Catholic Church this morning to celebrate the resurrection of Christ, their Easter Mass will conclude on an artistic note: the unveiling of what might be a forgotten masterpiece of American religious art. After decades of neglect, a restored painting of St. Aloysius Gonzaga will take its place in the main hall of the Calvert Street landmark. Officials say the canvas, and another that is being restored, could be the work of Constantino Brumidi, the 19th-century Italian-born master who created the famous murals depicting American history in the U.S. Capitol.
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