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By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Andre Agassi, who said, "I felt like I played well," after an opening victory in the Legg Mason Tennis Classic, found out just how faulty first impressions can be last night.After Agassi won a first-set tiebreaker against 15th seed Patrick Rafter of Australia, his game was last seen departing Rock Creek Park at about 8: 30 p.m.Nine straight games the No. 3-ranked player in the world lost, first being shut out in the second set, 6-0, then being cuffed around again in the third, 6-2.Then, in an even bigger upset, South African qualifer Neville Godwin continued his giant-killer number, defeating third seed Jim Courier, 6-4, 6-4, in the nightcap.
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By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2003
PARIS - They both won on a gloriously warm, fan-friendly opening day at the French Open, but they couldn't have looked more different at the finish line. First, Serena Williams, who exited the stadium court with a wide, self-satisfied smile after a brisk 54-minute yawner. Two and a half hours later, Vince Spadea walked slowly off Court 4 looking as if he had been run over by a 20-wheel rig. "I've got to eat something. Got to get a shower and eat something," Spadea mumbled with a blank stare as he headed for the men's locker room after steeling himself in the stretch run of a tense struggle with Irakli Labadze of Georgia to produce his sixth consecutive five-set victory.
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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 6, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England -This one is for the qualifiers with big dreams, the sports fans searching for a romantic yarn. On a cold, gray day when multimillionaire stars Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi and Patrick Rafter blasted through to Wimbledon's men's semifinals, a blue-eyed Belarussian in borrowed baggy shorts and on a budget barreled his way into a match of a lifetime. Vladimir Voltchkov defeated Byron Black, 7-6 (7-2), 7-6 (7-2), 6-4, yesterday and became the first Wimbledon men's qualifier to reach the semifinals since John McEnroe in 1977.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2000
Mark Philippoussis is a man who likes to ride snowboards, wakeboards and motorcycles. On the tennis court, he'll ride his 140-mph serve as far as it will take him. This has all been part of Philippoussis' self-described stroll through life. Until a phone call from Boris Becker in June. His boyhood hero chastised him, telling Philippoussis he needed to dedicate himself to his sport. It was nothing the Australian hadn't heard before, but as he heads into the U.S. Open today, the idea finally has taken hold.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1999
NEW YORK -- For years, Michael Chang's playground was the late-night match under the lights at the U.S. Open. It was there that he would scrap for every point and rally from almost every deficit.Six times in his career he has clawed his way back from two sets down for a five-set victory. But last night, there was no magic in the magnetic Chang.No. 52-ranked Arnaud Clement, a 21-year-old Frenchman, beat him 6-3, 6-3, 6-4.Chang's loss left the tournament without still another familiar face.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 7, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England - Patrick Rafter is playing on borrowed time. He doesn't know how many serves are left in his surgically repaired right shoulder. He doesn't know how many last best chances he'll have to win Wimbledon. But today, he'll try to turn back the clock and attempt to defeat Andre Agassi in a potentially compelling Wimbledon semifinal. It's a classic encounter of a serve-and-volley specialist (Rafter) against a baseline return artist (Agassi). Last year, Agassi routed the Australian in three sets.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 29, 1999
WIMBLEDON, England -- Give this man red clay and hot sun. Let him slide on a court for hours, bending shots while driving his opponents into the dust.But keep Gustavo Kuerten away from grass and rain.Until this year, that used to be the book on Kuerten. But not anymore. The Brazilian clay-court specialist has become a grass-court ace, blasting his way into the Wimbledon quarterfinals yesterday by beating Lorenzo Manta of Switzerland, 7-5, 6-4, 5-7, 6-3."I'm a grass-court player," Kuerten declared with a broad smile breaking across his face.
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2003
PARIS - They both won on a gloriously warm, fan-friendly opening day at the French Open, but they couldn't have looked more different at the finish line. First, Serena Williams, who exited the stadium court with a wide, self-satisfied smile after a brisk 54-minute yawner. Two and a half hours later, Vince Spadea walked slowly off Court 4 looking as if he had been run over by a 20-wheel rig. "I've got to eat something. Got to get a shower and eat something," Spadea mumbled with a blank stare as he headed for the men's locker room after steeling himself in the stretch run of a tense struggle with Irakli Labadze of Georgia to produce his sixth consecutive five-set victory.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Neville Godwin, a South African who had to survive a 7-6, 7-5 scare in a qualifying session to even make the field of the Legg Mason Tennis Classic, has decided to stick around for a while."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2000
Mark Philippoussis is a man who likes to ride snowboards, wakeboards and motorcycles. On the tennis court, he'll ride his 140-mph serve as far as it will take him. This has all been part of Philippoussis' self-described stroll through life. Until a phone call from Boris Becker in June. His boyhood hero chastised him, telling Philippoussis he needed to dedicate himself to his sport. It was nothing the Australian hadn't heard before, but as he heads into the U.S. Open today, the idea finally has taken hold.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 7, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England - Patrick Rafter is playing on borrowed time. He doesn't know how many serves are left in his surgically repaired right shoulder. He doesn't know how many last best chances he'll have to win Wimbledon. But today, he'll try to turn back the clock and attempt to defeat Andre Agassi in a potentially compelling Wimbledon semifinal. It's a classic encounter of a serve-and-volley specialist (Rafter) against a baseline return artist (Agassi). Last year, Agassi routed the Australian in three sets.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 6, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England -This one is for the qualifiers with big dreams, the sports fans searching for a romantic yarn. On a cold, gray day when multimillionaire stars Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi and Patrick Rafter blasted through to Wimbledon's men's semifinals, a blue-eyed Belarussian in borrowed baggy shorts and on a budget barreled his way into a match of a lifetime. Vladimir Voltchkov defeated Byron Black, 7-6 (7-2), 7-6 (7-2), 6-4, yesterday and became the first Wimbledon men's qualifier to reach the semifinals since John McEnroe in 1977.
SPORTS
By SANDRA McKEE and SANDRA McKEE,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1999
NEW YORK -- Not everyone playing in the U.S. Open is out to win it. Most players don't even think they can. Those are some of the truths No. 7 seed Todd Martin revealed yesterday after advancing to the third round with a 6-4, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1 victory over wild-card player Richey Reneberg. Martin, 29, his hair graying around the edges, has been playing Grand Slam tournaments since 1990. He's never won one and when asked if he thinks he ever will, almost choked. "It's impossible to predict," said Martin, who will play No. 81-ranked Magnus Larsson in the third round.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1999
NEW YORK -- For years, Michael Chang's playground was the late-night match under the lights at the U.S. Open. It was there that he would scrap for every point and rally from almost every deficit.Six times in his career he has clawed his way back from two sets down for a five-set victory. But last night, there was no magic in the magnetic Chang.No. 52-ranked Arnaud Clement, a 21-year-old Frenchman, beat him 6-3, 6-3, 6-4.Chang's loss left the tournament without still another familiar face.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 29, 1999
WIMBLEDON, England -- Give this man red clay and hot sun. Let him slide on a court for hours, bending shots while driving his opponents into the dust.But keep Gustavo Kuerten away from grass and rain.Until this year, that used to be the book on Kuerten. But not anymore. The Brazilian clay-court specialist has become a grass-court ace, blasting his way into the Wimbledon quarterfinals yesterday by beating Lorenzo Manta of Switzerland, 7-5, 6-4, 5-7, 6-3."I'm a grass-court player," Kuerten declared with a broad smile breaking across his face.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Andre Agassi, who said, "I felt like I played well," after an opening victory in the Legg Mason Tennis Classic, found out just how faulty first impressions can be last night.After Agassi won a first-set tiebreaker against 15th seed Patrick Rafter of Australia, his game was last seen departing Rock Creek Park at about 8: 30 p.m.Nine straight games the No. 3-ranked player in the world lost, first being shut out in the second set, 6-0, then being cuffed around again in the third, 6-2.Then, in an even bigger upset, South African qualifer Neville Godwin continued his giant-killer number, defeating third seed Jim Courier, 6-4, 6-4, in the nightcap.
SPORTS
By SANDRA McKEE and SANDRA McKEE,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1999
NEW YORK -- Not everyone playing in the U.S. Open is out to win it. Most players don't even think they can. Those are some of the truths No. 7 seed Todd Martin revealed yesterday after advancing to the third round with a 6-4, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1 victory over wild-card player Richey Reneberg. Martin, 29, his hair graying around the edges, has been playing Grand Slam tournaments since 1990. He's never won one and when asked if he thinks he ever will, almost choked. "It's impossible to predict," said Martin, who will play No. 81-ranked Magnus Larsson in the third round.
NEWS
July 11, 2001
GORAN Ivanisevic lacked the temperament of a champion, 'twas said. Three times a Wimbledon finalist, he always choked at the big points. Bad Goran couldn't control his anger at line calls, fury at mistakes. At 29, he was washed up, physically hurting, ranked 125th in the world, invited to Wimbledon only on a "wild card." What a setup. One after another, the rising stars of tennis fell to his relentless power serve and volley, so dominating his other skills, if any, rarely came into play.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Neville Godwin, a South African who had to survive a 7-6, 7-5 scare in a qualifying session to even make the field of the Legg Mason Tennis Classic, has decided to stick around for a while."
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