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Patrick O Connell

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NEWS
February 16, 2003
On February 11, 2003; BLANCHEREBECCA (nee O'Connell); beloved wife of the late Herbert E. DeBaugh; loving aunt of Patrick O'Connell and his wife Norma; dear godmother of Brian O'Connell and devoted sister-in-law of Dona Byron. A Funeral Service will be held at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26A), on Monday at 11 A.M. Interment Druid Ridge Cemetery. Friends may call on Sunday from 2 to 5 P.M. If desired contributions may be made to the Idlewylde United Methodist Church, 1000 Regester Avenue, Baltimore, Md 21239.
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NEWS
April 3, 2004
Mary Jane O'Connell, a homemaker, died of cancer March 27 at Joseph Richey Hospice in Baltimore. The Catonsville resident was 85. She was born Mary Jane Peters in Rockford, Ill., and raised on Fulton Avenue. She was a 1936 graduate of Mount St. Agnes High School and received a business degree from Mount St. Agnes College in Mount Washington. Mrs. O'Connell was a secretary at Maryland Casualty Co. in the mid-1940s and returned to work as a part-time legal secretary in Catonsville in 1965.
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NEWS
March 30, 2004
On March 27, 2004 MARY JANEO'CONNELL (nee Peters) beloved wife of Frederick J. O'Connell, devoted mother of Michael O'Connell and wife Suzanne, Patrick O'Connell and wife Mary, loving grandmother of Shannon Gallagher, Meghan Beyea, Kathleen and Matthew O'Connell. Friends may call at the Sterling-Ashton-Schwab Funeral Home, 736 Edmondson Ave. (1/2 mi W. of Beltway exit 14) on Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Mark's Chapel, on Wednesday at 10 A.M. Interment in New Cathedral Cemetery.
NEWS
March 30, 2004
On March 27, 2004 MARY JANEO'CONNELL (nee Peters) beloved wife of Frederick J. O'Connell, devoted mother of Michael O'Connell and wife Suzanne, Patrick O'Connell and wife Mary, loving grandmother of Shannon Gallagher, Meghan Beyea, Kathleen and Matthew O'Connell. Friends may call at the Sterling-Ashton-Schwab Funeral Home, 736 Edmondson Ave. (1/2 mi W. of Beltway exit 14) on Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Mark's Chapel, on Wednesday at 10 A.M. Interment in New Cathedral Cemetery.
NEWS
April 3, 2004
Mary Jane O'Connell, a homemaker, died of cancer March 27 at Joseph Richey Hospice in Baltimore. The Catonsville resident was 85. She was born Mary Jane Peters in Rockford, Ill., and raised on Fulton Avenue. She was a 1936 graduate of Mount St. Agnes High School and received a business degree from Mount St. Agnes College in Mount Washington. Mrs. O'Connell was a secretary at Maryland Casualty Co. in the mid-1940s and returned to work as a part-time legal secretary in Catonsville in 1965.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | November 13, 2002
IN THE BEGINNING, there might not have been jiggling jelly. The original Thanksgiving meal apparently did not have a vibrating column of congealed cranberries, fresh from the can, wiggling in the middle of the table. I find this a difficult notion to swallow. Yet people who have researched this field have pointed out that cranberries were not put in cans until the early 1900s. This is several centuries after the big Massachusetts feed in 1621 when some Native Americans, who called themselves the Eastern people, and the Pilgrims sat down for what is regarded as the first Thanksgiving.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 5, 1993
It was a good night for Mid-Atlantic chefs and a bad night for bustiers.The Inn at Little Washington, a gustatory treasure set in the hills of Virginia's Rappahannock County about 100 miles southwest of Baltimore, was named the best restaurant in America at the James Beard Awards, an annual black-tie gathering of the nation's chefs, restaurateurs and writers.Jean-Louis Palladin of Washington's Jean-Louis at the Watergate restaurant was named Chef of the Year, an honor he shared with Larry Forgione of New York's An American Place restaurant.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | February 4, 1998
WASHINGTON, VA. -- I don't need much of an excuse to wangle a trip to the Inn at Little Washington, the celebrated Virginia restaurant regarded as one of the best in the United States. Recently I went there to check out the tony establishment's link to a Dundalk factory. In short, I pursued the local angle to feast on foie gras.The inn has put in a new oven. And the inn's oven, like its meals -- $88 per person on weeknights, wine extra -- is far beyond the ordinary. Instead of a big, black hunk of metal shoved up against the kitchen wall, the new oven is a gorgeous mixture of gleaming copper and shimmering porcelain that serves as the dramatic centerpiece for a new kitchen layout.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 17, 1996
EVERY SO OFTEN you come across a fellow who doesn't play by the rules and is a roaring success, and you are delighted.Patrick O'Connell, the 51-year-old chef and co-owner of the Inn at Little Washington is one of those guys. He never went to culinary school. He started cooking, made mistakes and kept learning. Passion for cooking, he once said, is something that is "caught, not taught." Yet his restaurant has repeatedly been honored as one of the best in the United States. Patricia Wells, who lives in Paris and is a critic for the International Herald Tribune, proclaimed the inn one of the 10 best restaurants in the world.
NEWS
November 10, 2004
To make the brine for Patrick O'Connell's Spruced-Up Turkey recipe that ran in Taste last week, only loose sassafras tea should be used. The bark of sassafras root as a food additive is banned by the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
February 18, 2003
On February 11, 2003; BLANCHEREBECCA (nee O'Connell); beloved wife of the late Herbert E. DeBaugh; loving aunt of Patrick O'Connell and his wife Norma; dear godmother of Brian O'Connell and devoted sister-in-law of Dona Byron. The family will receive friends at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26A), on Thursday from 11 A.M. to 1 P.M. at which time a funeral service will be held. Inerment Druid Ridge Cemetery. If desired contributions may be made to the Idlewylde United Methodist Church, 1000 Regester Avenue, Baltimore, Md 21239.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | November 13, 2002
IN THE BEGINNING, there might not have been jiggling jelly. The original Thanksgiving meal apparently did not have a vibrating column of congealed cranberries, fresh from the can, wiggling in the middle of the table. I find this a difficult notion to swallow. Yet people who have researched this field have pointed out that cranberries were not put in cans until the early 1900s. This is several centuries after the big Massachusetts feed in 1621 when some Native Americans, who called themselves the Eastern people, and the Pilgrims sat down for what is regarded as the first Thanksgiving.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | February 4, 1998
WASHINGTON, VA. -- I don't need much of an excuse to wangle a trip to the Inn at Little Washington, the celebrated Virginia restaurant regarded as one of the best in the United States. Recently I went there to check out the tony establishment's link to a Dundalk factory. In short, I pursued the local angle to feast on foie gras.The inn has put in a new oven. And the inn's oven, like its meals -- $88 per person on weeknights, wine extra -- is far beyond the ordinary. Instead of a big, black hunk of metal shoved up against the kitchen wall, the new oven is a gorgeous mixture of gleaming copper and shimmering porcelain that serves as the dramatic centerpiece for a new kitchen layout.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 17, 1996
EVERY SO OFTEN you come across a fellow who doesn't play by the rules and is a roaring success, and you are delighted.Patrick O'Connell, the 51-year-old chef and co-owner of the Inn at Little Washington is one of those guys. He never went to culinary school. He started cooking, made mistakes and kept learning. Passion for cooking, he once said, is something that is "caught, not taught." Yet his restaurant has repeatedly been honored as one of the best in the United States. Patricia Wells, who lives in Paris and is a critic for the International Herald Tribune, proclaimed the inn one of the 10 best restaurants in the world.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 5, 1993
It was a good night for Mid-Atlantic chefs and a bad night for bustiers.The Inn at Little Washington, a gustatory treasure set in the hills of Virginia's Rappahannock County about 100 miles southwest of Baltimore, was named the best restaurant in America at the James Beard Awards, an annual black-tie gathering of the nation's chefs, restaurateurs and writers.Jean-Louis Palladin of Washington's Jean-Louis at the Watergate restaurant was named Chef of the Year, an honor he shared with Larry Forgione of New York's An American Place restaurant.
NEWS
September 21, 2005
SITE DU JOUR Wonderful Wholesale Warehouse Bulk Foods www.bulkfoods.com/products.asp You'll find 62 kinds of nuts at your fingertips, plus dried fruit, spices and herbs, snack mixes, beans and seeds, grains and cereals, health-food ingredients, snack mixes, baking mixes, fancy gourmet gifts and much, much more. - - Knight Ridder/Tribune EVENT Book Fair -- Chefs from around the country will appear at the 10th Annual Baltimore Book Festival this weekend. At 6 p.m. Friday, Bob Kinkead will prepare recipes from his book Kinkead's Cookbook.
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