Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPatrick Henry
IN THE NEWS

Patrick Henry

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2000
Patrick Henry Egan, who founded a ship-cleaning and cargo-lashing business, died Saturday of complications of cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 88 and lived in Timonium. Until he retired in 1988, he ran Egan Marine Contracting Co., a South Baltimore firm that cleaned and painted ships and secured cargoes loaded in Baltimore. The 77-foot-long section of the Baltimore waterfront he owned, located alongside the Domino Sugar Corp. plant, is the winter home of the Pride of Baltimore II. "He was an individualist who wanted to own his own business," said former U.S. Rep. Helen D. Bentley.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 21, 2012
100 Years Ago For the birds Tips in the household section of the Times: "Seasonable table linens: The all over tablecloth at luncheon is hopelessly old fashioned, the polished wood must show somewhere. Putting away winter clothing: Ostrich feathers for trimmings on cape ads and gloves small shawls and all the troublesome little things must be cleaned. Then orris and sandalwood powdered in sachets will keep out moths just as well as camphor and moth balls.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 19, 2009
On May 11, 2009, PATRICK HENRY HARRISON. Friends may visit the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Wednesday after 8:30 A.M., where the family will receive friends from 5 to 7 P.M. The family will also receive friends on Thursday at St. John United Methodist Church, 6019 Belle Grove Road at 11 A.M., with funeral service to follow at 11:30 A.M.
NEWS
October 26, 2011
I am happy to see that once again there are Americans raising their voices in protest. I know I'm not happy with the direction that our elected officials, the banking industry and the military-industrial complex are taking this country. Our third president, Thomas Jefferson, recognized the need for "a little rebellion every so often. " Critics of the people who are beginning to protest say they lack direction. But it seems to me that once groups of people emerge who are disenchanted enough to organize, leaders eventually will appear.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOHN RIVERA and JOHN RIVERA,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
Patrick Henry calls himself an "ironic Christian."By ironic, he doesn't mean he takes a "Seinfeld"-like cynical view of the world. Rather, he defines himself as a believer willing to let go of dogma and certainty, to wrestle with doubt and embrace wonder.Through several jarring life experiences, including his father's 1983 suicide, the church historian began to question assumptions about his faith and life he had always taken for granted. He began, he says, to see Christianity as a journey rather than a set of certainties.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2001
When President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced a $350 million emergency shipbuilding program in January 1941, its goal was to construct in three years more than half of the existing pre-war merchant fleet. To meet this need, shipyards across the nation were expanded to meet Roosevelt's goals. In Baltimore, Bethlehem Steel Corp's Sparrows Point yard was jammed with work for the Navy, so the company looked to Fairfield, in the southeast section of the city, for expansion of its facilities.
NEWS
July 1, 1994
County police charged two Baltimore men Wednesday in the attempted theft of a $4,000 Jet Ski from a Brooklyn Park back yard. Police said they saw two men acting suspiciously as they drove a Chevrolet step van around the neighborhood of Patrick Henry Drive and Wasena Avenue, at about 1:30 a.m.Later, a police detective saw the men taking a 1990 Sea Doo Bombardier Jet Ski from a back yard in the 5200 block of Patrick Henry Drive.Roland Andrew Jackson, 30, and Joseph William Jackson, 36, both of the same address in the 3900 block of 2nd St., were charged with theft of an item worth more than $300.
NEWS
November 1, 1994
Ten people were arrested Friday night when narcotics detectives raided two Brooklyn Park homes and seized crack cocaine and drug paraphernalia, county police said.A 1989 Ford Escort station wagon and $247 were also seized in the 11:30 p.m. raid at the two houses in the 5200 block of Patrick Henry Drive. Police said they recovered 1.5 grams of crack cocaine and nine glass vials with crack cocaine residue.Narcotics detectives staked out the houses for three weeks after neighbors complained of drug trafficking in the neighborhood.
NEWS
October 7, 2006
Capt. John L. Davis, a retired Chesapeake Bay pilot and model builder, died of pneumonia Sunday at his home in Murrells Inlet, S.C. The former Bel Air resident was 89. Captain Davis was born and raised in Elgin, Ill., and after leaving high school joined the Coast Guard during the 1930s and later was in the merchant marine. He served as third mate on the maiden voyage of the Patrick Henry, the first Liberty ship to be constructed in the nation and launched in 1941 at the Bethlehem-Fairfield shipyard in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Newport News Daily Press | February 16, 1994
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. -- Teen-agers accustomed to spending Friday and Saturday nights roaming Patrick Henry Mall will have to find a new place to hang out beginning this weekend.Mall Manager Roger Brown, saying he was fed up with foul language, rowdy behavior and lack of respect from some teens, is banning unaccompanied teen-agers under 18 from most of the mall's public areas and food court after 6 p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights."In the last few weeks I've seen the potential for losing control," Mr. Brown said yesterday.
NEWS
May 19, 2009
On May 11, 2009, PATRICK HENRY HARRISON. Friends may visit the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Wednesday after 8:30 A.M., where the family will receive friends from 5 to 7 P.M. The family will also receive friends on Thursday at St. John United Methodist Church, 6019 Belle Grove Road at 11 A.M., with funeral service to follow at 11:30 A.M.
NEWS
October 7, 2006
Capt. John L. Davis, a retired Chesapeake Bay pilot and model builder, died of pneumonia Sunday at his home in Murrells Inlet, S.C. The former Bel Air resident was 89. Captain Davis was born and raised in Elgin, Ill., and after leaving high school joined the Coast Guard during the 1930s and later was in the merchant marine. He served as third mate on the maiden voyage of the Patrick Henry, the first Liberty ship to be constructed in the nation and launched in 1941 at the Bethlehem-Fairfield shipyard in Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 15, 2002
Taverns typically are not airy, spacious places. But those attributes are what distinguishes Ropewalk from the passel of other watering holes in Federal Hill. The lion's share of dining space in the South Charles Street establishment is in a lofty, 19th-century warehouse, with plank floors and exposed brick walls. The room is large enough to absorb any smoke from the series of adjoining rooms. (And because Ropewalk has established a reputation as a cigar-friendly bar, there's plenty of smoke.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2001
When President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced a $350 million emergency shipbuilding program in January 1941, its goal was to construct in three years more than half of the existing pre-war merchant fleet. To meet this need, shipyards across the nation were expanded to meet Roosevelt's goals. In Baltimore, Bethlehem Steel Corp's Sparrows Point yard was jammed with work for the Navy, so the company looked to Fairfield, in the southeast section of the city, for expansion of its facilities.
TOPIC
July 1, 2001
WE ALL KNOW how to celebrate the Fourth of July, but how much do we know of the Revolutionary War, its famous personalities and the era? Try this quiz to get an idea. With only three options, it might seem easier than "Millionaire," but the payoff is in self-satisfaction rather than dollars. And be warned, some of the questions are tricky, and some of the answers might surprise you. 1. The Revolutionary War lasted from: A. 1775 to 1777. B. 1775 to 1783. C. 1776 to 1781. 2. The major military turning point in the war was the battle of: A. Brooklyn.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2001
ST. LOUIS -- If you want to chart how far the women's game has come over the 20 years since the NCAA first sponsored a tournament, Maryland coach Chris Weller thinks you need only listen now for the sounds of silence. Weller, who coached in the first NCAA Final Four in 1982, along with Tennessee's Pat Summitt, C. Vivian Stringer, then at Cheyney State, and Sonja Hogg, who coached at Louisiana Tech, recalls that the big thing was the controversy over which schools would play in the NCAA tournament and which would play in the now defunct Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women.
NEWS
October 26, 2011
I am happy to see that once again there are Americans raising their voices in protest. I know I'm not happy with the direction that our elected officials, the banking industry and the military-industrial complex are taking this country. Our third president, Thomas Jefferson, recognized the need for "a little rebellion every so often. " Critics of the people who are beginning to protest say they lack direction. But it seems to me that once groups of people emerge who are disenchanted enough to organize, leaders eventually will appear.
NEWS
February 25, 1998
Patrick Henry Crowe Sr., 70, BGE supervisorPatrick Henry Crowe Sr., a retired Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. supervisor, died Saturday of a heart attack at his Ellicott City residence. He was 70.Mr. Crowe joined BGE as a lineman in 1948 and retired in 1985. In the 1970s, he and his wife of 48 years, the former Marian T. HTC Healey, had a store in Ellicott City that specialized in antiques and fine linens.Born in Carroll Park in Southwest Baltimore, Mr. Crowe was educated at Mount St. Joseph High School.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 6, 2000
PURCELLVILLE, Va. - When Brian von Duyke first heard about the brand-new Patrick Henry College, he had the same reaction many do. A Christian college for students whose previous schooling was at home rather than in the classroom? Surely it would be "conservative and narrow-minded," he thought, "a potato masher where everyone comes out the same." Mark Hellweg had a similar assumption, imagining a campus full of "typical home-schooled, sheltered children with no social lives." When a college may be its students' first school away from their own kitchen tables, when it requires them to abide by an 11 p.m. curfew and receive parental permission to engage in "courtship," you get such first impressions - even from those who become members of your own Class of 2004.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2000
Patrick Henry Egan, who founded a ship-cleaning and cargo-lashing business, died Saturday of complications of cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 88 and lived in Timonium. Until he retired in 1988, he ran Egan Marine Contracting Co., a South Baltimore firm that cleaned and painted ships and secured cargoes loaded in Baltimore. The 77-foot-long section of the Baltimore waterfront he owned, located alongside the Domino Sugar Corp. plant, is the winter home of the Pride of Baltimore II. "He was an individualist who wanted to own his own business," said former U.S. Rep. Helen D. Bentley.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.