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Patricia Jessamy

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By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2010
When the question came during the debate — and how could it not, given the Canton locale — Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy started her answer on the defensive. Without "blaming anyone else," an audience member asked, what happened in the Zach Sowers case? Sowers was a newlywed in 2007 when teenagers attacked and robbed him — one boy beating him into a coma steps from his Patterson Park home. He died 10 months later, the case saddening and then infuriating the neighborhood.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
A year ago, Gregg Bernstein was a week into his new role as Baltimore's state's attorney, having narrowly unseated the incumbent, who held the job for 15 years. He was a relative unknown, and so self-confident he sometimes bordered on cocky. His friends in private practice, which he left behind to take on the lesser-paying public post, worried he would hate it. On some level, so did he. The prosecutors' offices, split between two halves of the ancient circuit courthouse downtown, were crumbling and rat-infested.
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NEWS
July 28, 2010
If the senseless and brutal murder of 23-year-old Stephen Pitcairn does not lead to a prosecution by Patricia Jessamy that seeks a death sentence penalty, then something is terribly wrong with the Baltimore City State's Attorney's Office. Morty Marcus
NEWS
September 30, 2010
As a volunteer in the Gregg Bernstein campaign, it saddens me racial demographics are being so minutely analyzed ("Bernstein crossed racial lines to win," Sept. 30). I happen to be white, but that's not why I volunteered for Mr. Bernstein. His skin color was no concern to me, it was his position on crime in Baltimore. I spent most of the day handing out his literature near my polling place in a predominantly white neighborhood (Little Italy), and I was appalled by the low turnout.
NEWS
September 7, 2010
During campaign season and other critical times, I look to the paper to see what its reporters and editors have to say about candidates and other issues. I may have missed this, but I can not find a recent article on the one issue that is dominating the race for Baltimore State's Attorney — incumbent Patricia Jessamy's policy to not prosecute cases that have only a single eyewitness as evidence. Her opponent, Gregg Bernstein, is making much of this issue, yet, it seems a reasonable decision to me in that it preserves her ability to prosecute the case should more evidence come to light.
NEWS
September 30, 2010
As a volunteer in the Gregg Bernstein campaign, it saddens me racial demographics are being so minutely analyzed ("Bernstein crossed racial lines to win," Sept. 30). I happen to be white, but that's not why I volunteered for Mr. Bernstein. His skin color was no concern to me, it was his position on crime in Baltimore. I spent most of the day handing out his literature near my polling place in a predominantly white neighborhood (Little Italy), and I was appalled by the low turnout.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
As Don Meredith (former quarterback of the Dallas Cowboys and Monday Night Football analyst) used to say, "If ifs and buts were candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas. " Patricia Jessamy apologists complain that, but for Sheryl Lansey's entry into the race for Baltimore City state's attorney, Ms. Jessamy would have been re-elected ("3rd-place finisher doesn't mind being called a 'spoiler,'" Sept. 17). Applying that dubious rationale, Bill Clinton would still be chasing skirts in Arkansas and Hillary Clinton would still be practicing law in Little Rock and making tons of money as an astute commodities trader if not for H. Ross Perot.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 15, 2010
As many as 10,000 of Baltimore's primary votes could still be missing, according to Patricia Jessamy's state's attorney campaign staff, who told her that memory cards from 27 machines in six districts were unaccounted for. If accurate, it could leave room for the election to sway back toward Jessamy, the incumbent, who's narrowly trailing challenger Gregg Bernstein. But city Board of Elections Director Armstead B.C. Jones Sr. said the figures sounded high to him, and that none of it would matter by the end of the day. "We are going to get to 100 percent" of the votes cast at polling places, he said.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2010
The union representing Baltimore police officers has endorsed attorney Gregg Bernstein in his race against incumbent Patricia C. Jessamy for state's attorney, saying the labor organization believes he will work "to ensure no violent crime goes unpunished. " The endorsement from the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 3, which represents 5,000 active-duty and retired city officers, is not surprising given complaints from the rank and file that Jessamy frequently blames police for bringing weak cases that force prosecutors to drop charges or agree to what some consider lenient sentences.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | August 22, 2010
Patricia Jessamy has a tough sell: "Keep me in office. I'm experienced. I've done a good job. Violent crime is down significantly in Baltimore since I took office, and I deserve some credit for that. I send thousands of criminals to prison every year. " Gregg Bernstein, Mrs. Jessamy's challenger in the September Democratic primary, is the underdog but, in many ways, he has an easier pitch: "Pat Jessamy has been state's attorney for 15 years. If you think she's done a good enough job, then keep her. But, I say 'good enough' isn't good enough.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
As Don Meredith (former quarterback of the Dallas Cowboys and Monday Night Football analyst) used to say, "If ifs and buts were candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas. " Patricia Jessamy apologists complain that, but for Sheryl Lansey's entry into the race for Baltimore City state's attorney, Ms. Jessamy would have been re-elected ("3rd-place finisher doesn't mind being called a 'spoiler,'" Sept. 17). Applying that dubious rationale, Bill Clinton would still be chasing skirts in Arkansas and Hillary Clinton would still be practicing law in Little Rock and making tons of money as an astute commodities trader if not for H. Ross Perot.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
Patricia Jessamy's legal team is scrutinizing the results of the Baltimore state's attorney's race as challenger Gregg Bernstein's lead widened Thursday after the first round of absentee ballots were counted. Jessamy's lawyers sent letters to both state and city election officials Thursday asking for: •a complete list of the voting machines used in the primary election, a guarantee that the vote verification process will be conducted in public, the election judges' manual and copies of the written procedures for handling voting information at the polling sites as well as for transporting it to the elections board.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 15, 2010
As many as 10,000 of Baltimore's primary votes could still be missing, according to Patricia Jessamy's state's attorney campaign staff, who told her that memory cards from 27 machines in six districts were unaccounted for. If accurate, it could leave room for the election to sway back toward Jessamy, the incumbent, who's narrowly trailing challenger Gregg Bernstein. But city Board of Elections Director Armstead B.C. Jones Sr. said the figures sounded high to him, and that none of it would matter by the end of the day. "We are going to get to 100 percent" of the votes cast at polling places, he said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2010
When the question came during the debate — and how could it not, given the Canton locale — Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy started her answer on the defensive. Without "blaming anyone else," an audience member asked, what happened in the Zach Sowers case? Sowers was a newlywed in 2007 when teenagers attacked and robbed him — one boy beating him into a coma steps from his Patterson Park home. He died 10 months later, the case saddening and then infuriating the neighborhood.
NEWS
September 7, 2010
During campaign season and other critical times, I look to the paper to see what its reporters and editors have to say about candidates and other issues. I may have missed this, but I can not find a recent article on the one issue that is dominating the race for Baltimore State's Attorney — incumbent Patricia Jessamy's policy to not prosecute cases that have only a single eyewitness as evidence. Her opponent, Gregg Bernstein, is making much of this issue, yet, it seems a reasonable decision to me in that it preserves her ability to prosecute the case should more evidence come to light.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2010
The union representing Baltimore police officers has endorsed attorney Gregg Bernstein in his race against incumbent Patricia C. Jessamy for state's attorney, saying the labor organization believes he will work "to ensure no violent crime goes unpunished. " The endorsement from the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 3, which represents 5,000 active-duty and retired city officers, is not surprising given complaints from the rank and file that Jessamy frequently blames police for bringing weak cases that force prosecutors to drop charges or agree to what some consider lenient sentences.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2010
The defense attorney vying to be the city's top prosecutor released a television ad Monday in which a former state's attorney's office employee says "people are getting away with murder and it's because Patricia Jessamy fails to convict them. " The commercial also links Jessamy's office with the deaths of seven people in a 2002 firebombing. In addition, the ad features an image of an off-duty city police spokesman speaking to defense attorney Gregg Bernstein, which could raise more questions about the link between Bernstein's campaign and the police department.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
Patricia Jessamy's legal team is scrutinizing the results of the Baltimore state's attorney's race as challenger Gregg Bernstein's lead widened Thursday after the first round of absentee ballots were counted. Jessamy's lawyers sent letters to both state and city election officials Thursday asking for: •a complete list of the voting machines used in the primary election, a guarantee that the vote verification process will be conducted in public, the election judges' manual and copies of the written procedures for handling voting information at the polling sites as well as for transporting it to the elections board.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2010
The defense attorney vying to be the city's top prosecutor released a television ad Monday in which a former state's attorney's office employee says "people are getting away with murder and it's because Patricia Jessamy fails to convict them. " The commercial also links Jessamy's office with the deaths of seven people in a 2002 firebombing. In addition, the ad features an image of an off-duty city police spokesman speaking to defense attorney Gregg Bernstein, which could raise more questions about the link between Bernstein's campaign and the police department.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | August 22, 2010
Patricia Jessamy has a tough sell: "Keep me in office. I'm experienced. I've done a good job. Violent crime is down significantly in Baltimore since I took office, and I deserve some credit for that. I send thousands of criminals to prison every year. " Gregg Bernstein, Mrs. Jessamy's challenger in the September Democratic primary, is the underdog but, in many ways, he has an easier pitch: "Pat Jessamy has been state's attorney for 15 years. If you think she's done a good enough job, then keep her. But, I say 'good enough' isn't good enough.
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