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Patricia Cornwell

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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff | July 28, 1996
"Cause of Death," by Patricia Cornwell. G.P. Putnam's Sons. 352 pages.$25.95.A regular reader of mysteries must, on occasion, break things off with a perfectly wonderful character. It's the same old story: You grow apart. She wants one thing, you want something else. Perhaps she's just too good for you.Dr. Kay Scarpetta and I went our separate ways after I read the first four books in Patricia Cornwell's series about the Virginia medical examiner. Scarpetta wanted to venture deeper into thriller territory; I wanted fewer serial killers in my life.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Amazon.com, Publishers Weekly | November 30, 2008
tuesday Scarpetta : by Patricia Cornwell (Putnam, $27.95) Leaving behind her private forensic pathology practice in Charleston, S.C., Kay Scarpetta accepts an assignment in New York City, where she encounters an injured man in Bellevue Hospital's psychiatric prison ward who has a bizarre story to tell. The Charlemagne Pursuit : by Steve Berry (Ballantine, $26) In Berry's fourth thriller, ex--Justice Department agent Cotton Malone searches for answers about his father, Capt. Forrest Malone, after learning that his death wasn't in a 1971 nuclear sub accident in the North Atlantic, but occurred while he was on a secret submarine mission to the Antarctic.
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FEATURES
By Don O'Briant and Don O'Briant,New York Times News Service | October 25, 1998
"Scarpetta's Winter Table," by Patricia Cornwell. Wyrick & Co. 80 pages. $19.95.Patricia Cornwell's fictional medical examiner Kay Scarpetta is known more for slicing and dicing bodies than for whipping up holiday recipes. But apparently there's more to the good doctor than meets the eye. In "Scarpetta's Winter Table" (Wyrick & Co., 80 pages, $19.95), Cornwell takes a break from her best-selling whodunits to show the softer sides of Scarpetta, her niece Lucy and her police sidekick, Pete Marino.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES | November 6, 2005
After more than two years dominating The New York Times best-seller list, The Da Vinci Code, by Dan Brown, is dropping off the list, at least temporarily. In the week ended Oct. 29, The Da Vinci Code ranked 16th in the statistically weighted survey of almost 4,000 bookstores and wholesalers serving 50,000 other retailers. Therefore, it will be missing from the list of the top 15 best-selling books, to be published in the Nov. 13 edition of The Times Book Review. On the list to be published today, The Da Vinci Code ranks No. 12, in its 136th consecutive week on the list.
FEATURES
By Bobbie Hess and Bobbie Hess,New York Times News Service | July 12, 1998
"Point of Origin," by Patricia Cornwell. Putnam. 356 pages. $25.95.Cornwell's ninth thriller featuring Dr. Kay Scarpetta, Virginia's chief medical examiner, is the best yet.It's been five years since killer Carrie Grethen was incarcerated in a psychiatric center. Suddenly, Scarpetta gets a note from Carrie, indicating she's not done causing mayhem for Scarpetta and others."Point of Origin" moves with tension-building pace and Cornwell's characters are more highly developed than her previous works.
NEWS
December 5, 2002
An interview with Kathryn Underwood, founding member of Book Bags book club. What book are members reading? Currently, we're reading The Lovely Bones [by Alice Sebold]. It's a little girl's perspective. She was brutally murdered, and she's in heaven. And she talks about what it's like to be up there, and she watches her parents from up there, and she watches the murderer. ... It's very different than anything else we've read. What books have generated good discussions? I think the book that we read that generated the most discussion was Divine Secrets of the Ya Ya Sisterhood [by Rebecca Wells]
NEWS
December 24, 1992
Here are some of the books available on tape at the Carroll County Public Library branches.These books were recommended by Jacqueline Adams, materials management coordinator.Ms. Adams also writes reviews for AudioFile magazine, which is devoted to books on tape."Brideshead Revisited," by Evelyn Waugh, read by Jeremy Irons, who also starred in the PBS series based on the book."For the Sake of Elena," a mystery by Elizabeth George, read by Derek Jacobi"It Doesn't Take a Hero," the autobiography of General H. Norman Schwarzkopf, who reads his book on tape.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES | November 6, 2005
After more than two years dominating The New York Times best-seller list, The Da Vinci Code, by Dan Brown, is dropping off the list, at least temporarily. In the week ended Oct. 29, The Da Vinci Code ranked 16th in the statistically weighted survey of almost 4,000 bookstores and wholesalers serving 50,000 other retailers. Therefore, it will be missing from the list of the top 15 best-selling books, to be published in the Nov. 13 edition of The Times Book Review. On the list to be published today, The Da Vinci Code ranks No. 12, in its 136th consecutive week on the list.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amazon.com, Publishers Weekly | November 30, 2008
tuesday Scarpetta : by Patricia Cornwell (Putnam, $27.95) Leaving behind her private forensic pathology practice in Charleston, S.C., Kay Scarpetta accepts an assignment in New York City, where she encounters an injured man in Bellevue Hospital's psychiatric prison ward who has a bizarre story to tell. The Charlemagne Pursuit : by Steve Berry (Ballantine, $26) In Berry's fourth thriller, ex--Justice Department agent Cotton Malone searches for answers about his father, Capt. Forrest Malone, after learning that his death wasn't in a 1971 nuclear sub accident in the North Atlantic, but occurred while he was on a secret submarine mission to the Antarctic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elsbeth L. Bothe and By Elsbeth L. Bothe,Special to the Sun | November 17, 2002
Portrait of a Killer: Jack the Ripper Case Closed, by Patricia Cornwell. Putnam. 352 pages. $27.95 Rich and vainglorious from writing blockbusting detective fiction, Patricia Cornwell has applied her considerable funds and fertile imagination to the realm of true crime, choosing, as she would, history's most celebrated case. Without troubling to consult, credit or contradict a wealth of investigation over the past 114 years, Cornwell claims to have finally caught London's legendary serial killer, Jack the Ripper.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,Special to the Sun | September 4, 2005
REMAINS SILENT By Michael Baden and Linda Kenney. Alfred A. Knopf, 224 pages. TRACE EVIDENCE By Elizabeth Becka. Hyperion, 300 pages. It may seem difficult to believe that the forensic-drenched mystery novel is a fairly recent phenomenon, but it only emerged as a viable sub-genre less than 20 years ago. But thanks to television shows like CSI and Cold Case Files, the public's thirst for scientific detail has only increased, with no signs of being...
NEWS
December 5, 2002
An interview with Kathryn Underwood, founding member of Book Bags book club. What book are members reading? Currently, we're reading The Lovely Bones [by Alice Sebold]. It's a little girl's perspective. She was brutally murdered, and she's in heaven. And she talks about what it's like to be up there, and she watches her parents from up there, and she watches the murderer. ... It's very different than anything else we've read. What books have generated good discussions? I think the book that we read that generated the most discussion was Divine Secrets of the Ya Ya Sisterhood [by Rebecca Wells]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elsbeth L. Bothe and By Elsbeth L. Bothe,Special to the Sun | November 17, 2002
Portrait of a Killer: Jack the Ripper Case Closed, by Patricia Cornwell. Putnam. 352 pages. $27.95 Rich and vainglorious from writing blockbusting detective fiction, Patricia Cornwell has applied her considerable funds and fertile imagination to the realm of true crime, choosing, as she would, history's most celebrated case. Without troubling to consult, credit or contradict a wealth of investigation over the past 114 years, Cornwell claims to have finally caught London's legendary serial killer, Jack the Ripper.
FEATURES
By Don O'Briant and Don O'Briant,New York Times News Service | October 25, 1998
"Scarpetta's Winter Table," by Patricia Cornwell. Wyrick & Co. 80 pages. $19.95.Patricia Cornwell's fictional medical examiner Kay Scarpetta is known more for slicing and dicing bodies than for whipping up holiday recipes. But apparently there's more to the good doctor than meets the eye. In "Scarpetta's Winter Table" (Wyrick & Co., 80 pages, $19.95), Cornwell takes a break from her best-selling whodunits to show the softer sides of Scarpetta, her niece Lucy and her police sidekick, Pete Marino.
FEATURES
By Bobbie Hess and Bobbie Hess,New York Times News Service | July 12, 1998
"Point of Origin," by Patricia Cornwell. Putnam. 356 pages. $25.95.Cornwell's ninth thriller featuring Dr. Kay Scarpetta, Virginia's chief medical examiner, is the best yet.It's been five years since killer Carrie Grethen was incarcerated in a psychiatric center. Suddenly, Scarpetta gets a note from Carrie, indicating she's not done causing mayhem for Scarpetta and others."Point of Origin" moves with tension-building pace and Cornwell's characters are more highly developed than her previous works.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff | July 28, 1996
"Cause of Death," by Patricia Cornwell. G.P. Putnam's Sons. 352 pages.$25.95.A regular reader of mysteries must, on occasion, break things off with a perfectly wonderful character. It's the same old story: You grow apart. She wants one thing, you want something else. Perhaps she's just too good for you.Dr. Kay Scarpetta and I went our separate ways after I read the first four books in Patricia Cornwell's series about the Virginia medical examiner. Scarpetta wanted to venture deeper into thriller territory; I wanted fewer serial killers in my life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,Special to the Sun | September 4, 2005
REMAINS SILENT By Michael Baden and Linda Kenney. Alfred A. Knopf, 224 pages. TRACE EVIDENCE By Elizabeth Becka. Hyperion, 300 pages. It may seem difficult to believe that the forensic-drenched mystery novel is a fairly recent phenomenon, but it only emerged as a viable sub-genre less than 20 years ago. But thanks to television shows like CSI and Cold Case Files, the public's thirst for scientific detail has only increased, with no signs of being...
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | August 31, 1992
Initial pre-mortem report: Subject is white woman, short, with slender build. Fully clothed. Short blond hair, blue eyes. Lightly tanned. No obvious signs of trauma. Distinguishing mark: black socks patterned with jack of hearts playing cards.It's a dead giveaway.Subject can be identified as Patricia D. Cornwell, author of the just-published "All That Remains," a novel that follows Dr. Kay Scarpetta, Virginia's chief medical examiner, on the trail of a serial killer who leaves a jack of hearts at the scene of each crime.
NEWS
December 24, 1992
Here are some of the books available on tape at the Carroll County Public Library branches.These books were recommended by Jacqueline Adams, materials management coordinator.Ms. Adams also writes reviews for AudioFile magazine, which is devoted to books on tape."Brideshead Revisited," by Evelyn Waugh, read by Jeremy Irons, who also starred in the PBS series based on the book."For the Sake of Elena," a mystery by Elizabeth George, read by Derek Jacobi"It Doesn't Take a Hero," the autobiography of General H. Norman Schwarzkopf, who reads his book on tape.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | August 31, 1992
Initial pre-mortem report: Subject is white woman, short, with slender build. Fully clothed. Short blond hair, blue eyes. Lightly tanned. No obvious signs of trauma. Distinguishing mark: black socks patterned with jack of hearts playing cards.It's a dead giveaway.Subject can be identified as Patricia D. Cornwell, author of the just-published "All That Remains," a novel that follows Dr. Kay Scarpetta, Virginia's chief medical examiner, on the trail of a serial killer who leaves a jack of hearts at the scene of each crime.
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