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By Lewis Beale and Lewis Beale,Newsday | March 13, 2008
The next time anyone mentions the alleged lack of roles for actresses of a certain age, say this name like a mantra: Patricia Clarkson. The 48-year-old New Orleans native has been working steadily for 20 years, has never been pinned down as a certain "type" and is busier than ever. Beginning two days ago with the debut of Married Life, in which she stars with Chris Cooper and Pierce Brosnan as a happily married woman whose cheating husband wants to kill her, Clarkson is set to have a year most actors only dream of. Already in the can and ready for release are Blind Date, starring Clarkson and Stanley Tucci, about a couple trying to rekindle their relationship; Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Woody Allen's latest; and Elegy, from French director Isabel Coixet, co-starring Ben Kingsley and Penelope Cruz.
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By McClatchy-Tribune | March 17, 2009
Starring Ben Kingsley, Penelope Cruz, Dennis Hopper, Patricia Clarkson, Peter Sarsgaard and Deborah Harry. Directed by Isabel Coixet. Released by Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. $27.96. Rated R. *** 1/2 (3 1/2 STARS) There always seems to be a shortage of good, mature movies for adults. And by "adult," we're talking about movies that treat sex as both a natural part of human life and as just one part of that life. Elegy, based on Philip Roth's novella The Dying Animal, is about a middle-aged professor (Ben Kingsley)
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NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | September 2, 2008
DVDS Starring Pierce Brosnan, Chris Cooper, Rachel McAdams, Patricia Clarkson - Directed by Ira Sachs - Sony Pictures - $28.96, $38.96 Blu-ray Tired of being married to his noble but unexciting (at least to him) wife, Pat (Patricia Clarkson), businessman Harry Allen (Chris Cooper) decides the only honorable thing to do is kill her - especially since naive young Kay (Rachel McAdams) is ready to pick up the slack. Only problem is, his best friend, Richard (Pierce Brosnan), also has a thing for Kay - and isn't sure Pat deserves to end up dead.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | September 2, 2008
DVDS Starring Pierce Brosnan, Chris Cooper, Rachel McAdams, Patricia Clarkson - Directed by Ira Sachs - Sony Pictures - $28.96, $38.96 Blu-ray Tired of being married to his noble but unexciting (at least to him) wife, Pat (Patricia Clarkson), businessman Harry Allen (Chris Cooper) decides the only honorable thing to do is kill her - especially since naive young Kay (Rachel McAdams) is ready to pick up the slack. Only problem is, his best friend, Richard (Pierce Brosnan), also has a thing for Kay - and isn't sure Pat deserves to end up dead.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | March 17, 2009
Starring Ben Kingsley, Penelope Cruz, Dennis Hopper, Patricia Clarkson, Peter Sarsgaard and Deborah Harry. Directed by Isabel Coixet. Released by Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. $27.96. Rated R. *** 1/2 (3 1/2 STARS) There always seems to be a shortage of good, mature movies for adults. And by "adult," we're talking about movies that treat sex as both a natural part of human life and as just one part of that life. Elegy, based on Philip Roth's novella The Dying Animal, is about a middle-aged professor (Ben Kingsley)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 31, 2003
Pieces of April has a shred of originality that keeps its humor prickly and its drama sharp for an hour and 21 minutes. It's the Thanksgiving Day fable of a bohemian New York City girl named April (Katie Holmes) and her attempt to cook a turkey for her suburban family in her grungy Lower East Side digs. April has never gotten along with her mother (Patricia Clarkson), who happens to be riddled with cancer -- a fact that might have made the whole movie mawkish and sickly sweet. Luckily, Clarkson and writer-director Peter Hedges have the wit to create a thorny, sometimes harshly playful character who is full of surprises, whether telling her smug "good" daughter (Alison Pill)
FEATURES
By Carrie Rickey and Carrie Rickey,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 5, 1999
"Simply Irresistible," a heavily diluted version of "Like Water for Chocolate," stars Sarah Michelle Gellar as a chef with such mystical powers that people who eat her meals float off on clouds of romantic rapture.One of the other ways in which the film declares itself a fantasy is that Gellar, as the saucy Amanda Shelton, wears a $500 Todd Oldham gold lame camisole and four-inch spike heels to work in a Manhattan restaurant kitchen.The film opens as Amanda cruises the Union Square green market, shopping for the restaurant, and receives condolences from vendors who've heard that the third-generation joint where Amanda's late mother once cooked is about to close.
FEATURES
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 7, 2003
NEW YORK - Roman Polanski's The Pianist, an emotionally devastating portrait of Polish life during the Holocaust, was the big winner at the 37th annual award vote meeting of The National Society of Film Critics, taking four major prizes: best director, actor, screenplay and film. Polanski's movie was based on the true-life memoirs of Wladyslaw Szpilman, a young classical pianist who lived through the hellish World War II Nazi occupation in Warsaw. It has been hailed as a definitive comeback for the controversial director, who, as a youngster, experienced the Polish holocaust years himself in Krakow, the site of Schindler's List.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 14, 2005
Good Night, and Good Luck has the guts and the smarts to tell several interlocked stories with passion, wit and sting. At its red-hot center is the attempt of CBS star newscaster Edward R. Murrow (David Strathairn) to expose the obscene over-reaching of anti-communist witch-hunter Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy, a Republican from Wisconsin. It's 1954, and after years of witnessing the senator make accusations stick using guilt by association and brute repetition, Murrow thinks it's time to debunk the senator's methods - and aims to do so in an uncharacteristic attack episode of his trailblazing weekly TV news show, See It Now. But the movie is also about the moral and professional stance Murrow and his producer, Fred Friendly (George Clooney)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 28, 2003
Director David Gordon Green strives to capture feelings beyond his characters' articulation. That quest suffuses his small town young-love story, All the Real Girls, with a febrile yearning that grows more affecting as the movie goes along. It starts with a beautiful long build to a first kiss between an amiable, fuzzy-looking guy named Paul (Paul Schneider) and a big-eyed knockout named Noel (Zooey Deschanel). The scene announces a picture fashioned around gestures and tossed-off revelations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lewis Beale and Lewis Beale,Newsday | March 13, 2008
The next time anyone mentions the alleged lack of roles for actresses of a certain age, say this name like a mantra: Patricia Clarkson. The 48-year-old New Orleans native has been working steadily for 20 years, has never been pinned down as a certain "type" and is busier than ever. Beginning two days ago with the debut of Married Life, in which she stars with Chris Cooper and Pierce Brosnan as a happily married woman whose cheating husband wants to kill her, Clarkson is set to have a year most actors only dream of. Already in the can and ready for release are Blind Date, starring Clarkson and Stanley Tucci, about a couple trying to rekindle their relationship; Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Woody Allen's latest; and Elegy, from French director Isabel Coixet, co-starring Ben Kingsley and Penelope Cruz.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 14, 2005
Good Night, and Good Luck has the guts and the smarts to tell several interlocked stories with passion, wit and sting. At its red-hot center is the attempt of CBS star newscaster Edward R. Murrow (David Strathairn) to expose the obscene over-reaching of anti-communist witch-hunter Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy, a Republican from Wisconsin. It's 1954, and after years of witnessing the senator make accusations stick using guilt by association and brute repetition, Murrow thinks it's time to debunk the senator's methods - and aims to do so in an uncharacteristic attack episode of his trailblazing weekly TV news show, See It Now. But the movie is also about the moral and professional stance Murrow and his producer, Fred Friendly (George Clooney)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 31, 2003
Pieces of April has a shred of originality that keeps its humor prickly and its drama sharp for an hour and 21 minutes. It's the Thanksgiving Day fable of a bohemian New York City girl named April (Katie Holmes) and her attempt to cook a turkey for her suburban family in her grungy Lower East Side digs. April has never gotten along with her mother (Patricia Clarkson), who happens to be riddled with cancer -- a fact that might have made the whole movie mawkish and sickly sweet. Luckily, Clarkson and writer-director Peter Hedges have the wit to create a thorny, sometimes harshly playful character who is full of surprises, whether telling her smug "good" daughter (Alison Pill)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 28, 2003
Director David Gordon Green strives to capture feelings beyond his characters' articulation. That quest suffuses his small town young-love story, All the Real Girls, with a febrile yearning that grows more affecting as the movie goes along. It starts with a beautiful long build to a first kiss between an amiable, fuzzy-looking guy named Paul (Paul Schneider) and a big-eyed knockout named Noel (Zooey Deschanel). The scene announces a picture fashioned around gestures and tossed-off revelations.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 14, 2003
Once upon a time - think of 1983's Twilight Zone: The Movie - filmmakers could mount "anthology films": a handful of short tales linked by (if anything) an author, a genre or a recurring character or theme. The Safety of Objects might have been more piquant if the movie's writer-director, Rose Troche, had decided to film A.M. Homes' book of suburban short stories that way. Instead, she divided the stories into their component pieces and erected a vast new Tinker Toy construction. Troche's movie interconnects the families of such distinct characters as a mother (Glenn Close)
FEATURES
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 7, 2003
NEW YORK - Roman Polanski's The Pianist, an emotionally devastating portrait of Polish life during the Holocaust, was the big winner at the 37th annual award vote meeting of The National Society of Film Critics, taking four major prizes: best director, actor, screenplay and film. Polanski's movie was based on the true-life memoirs of Wladyslaw Szpilman, a young classical pianist who lived through the hellish World War II Nazi occupation in Warsaw. It has been hailed as a definitive comeback for the controversial director, who, as a youngster, experienced the Polish holocaust years himself in Krakow, the site of Schindler's List.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 14, 2003
Once upon a time - think of 1983's Twilight Zone: The Movie - filmmakers could mount "anthology films": a handful of short tales linked by (if anything) an author, a genre or a recurring character or theme. The Safety of Objects might have been more piquant if the movie's writer-director, Rose Troche, had decided to film A.M. Homes' book of suburban short stories that way. Instead, she divided the stories into their component pieces and erected a vast new Tinker Toy construction. Troche's movie interconnects the families of such distinct characters as a mother (Glenn Close)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 4, 2002
I will say one thing for NBC's Carrie, the remake of the 1976 movie based on Stephen King's classic novel, I cannot get it out of my head. Almost a week after screening it, and I still can't decide which is my favorite line of dialogue, Carrie's mother shouting, "Carrie, go to your closet and pray," or mom demanding, "Say it, Carrie: Eve was weak. Say it, say it, say it: Eve was weak!" Both keep ringing in my mind. And how about that marvelous moment when her mother finally lets Carrie out of the closet after she's been locked in there all evening for wanting to go to the prom, and mom sticks out her chin for Carrie to kiss before she hurries off to bed?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 4, 2002
I will say one thing for NBC's Carrie, the remake of the 1976 movie based on Stephen King's classic novel, I cannot get it out of my head. Almost a week after screening it, and I still can't decide which is my favorite line of dialogue, Carrie's mother shouting, "Carrie, go to your closet and pray," or mom demanding, "Say it, Carrie: Eve was weak. Say it, say it, say it: Eve was weak!" Both keep ringing in my mind. And how about that marvelous moment when her mother finally lets Carrie out of the closet after she's been locked in there all evening for wanting to go to the prom, and mom sticks out her chin for Carrie to kiss before she hurries off to bed?
FEATURES
By Carrie Rickey and Carrie Rickey,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 5, 1999
"Simply Irresistible," a heavily diluted version of "Like Water for Chocolate," stars Sarah Michelle Gellar as a chef with such mystical powers that people who eat her meals float off on clouds of romantic rapture.One of the other ways in which the film declares itself a fantasy is that Gellar, as the saucy Amanda Shelton, wears a $500 Todd Oldham gold lame camisole and four-inch spike heels to work in a Manhattan restaurant kitchen.The film opens as Amanda cruises the Union Square green market, shopping for the restaurant, and receives condolences from vendors who've heard that the third-generation joint where Amanda's late mother once cooked is about to close.
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