Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPatricia Arquette
IN THE NEWS

Patricia Arquette

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
March 6, 2006
Critic's Pick-- Seeking the brother of the DA's buddy, Allison (Patricia Arquette, above) becomes delusional in Medium (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11).
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 2009
Series The Big Bang Theory: : Penny (Kaley Cuoco) develops a rivalry with a sexy new neighbor (Valerie Azlynn). (8 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) Chuck: : A heartless agent is sent to evaluate Sarah's (Yvonne Strahovski) performance as Chuck's (Zachary Levi) handler after he reveals his feelings about her. (8 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11) House: : A man (Mos Def) awakens in a New York hospital after a bicycle accident, unable to move or communicate. (8 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) Greek: : As a new season gets under way, Casey (Spencer Grammer)
Advertisement
NEWS
February 9, 2009
Series American Experience: : "The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln" focuses on the months after his death, when a nation mourned and authorities sought his killer. Will Patton reads the words of John Wilkes Booth. (9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22/67) The Girls of Hedsor Hall: : Young women try to become ladies at a proper English finishing school in this new, unscripted series. (9 p.m., MTV) Medium: : Allison (Patricia Arquette) dreams of murders witnessed by someone who's already dead. (10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
FEATURES
March 31, 2008
The pseudo-improvised reality series The Hills, as it plays out beyond MTV on tabloid covers, is back stronger than ever after a three-month hiatus. Last Monday's return averaged 4.8 million total viewers, a new high for the show. The Hills, set among young aspirants of the Hollywood Hills music and fashion industries, continues to track the emotional warfare between former best friends Lauren Conrad and Heidi Montag while delving more deeply into the twistedness, gaslighting and superficiality of the boyfriends who ensure that the tortured rivals treat each other like Crips and Bloods.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 18, 2003
Holes, based on a beloved, award-winning children's book, is so faithful to its source that legions of schoolkids and their teachers will clasp it to their hearts. After all, it's a glorified set of illustrations that will extend, or at least not get in the way of, their original reading experience. Those who come to the movie cold will find it an exasperating assembly of brutal pedantry and whimsies, boasting far less charm or grace than even the first Harry Potter picture. It's partly a broad satire on teen boot camps: The hero, Stanley Yelnats (Shia LaBeouf)
FEATURES
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,Boston Globe | February 13, 1994
Remember the Brat Pack, that very hot "Breakfast Club" of 1980s actors who made youth look like a Coors beer commercial?They were America's favorite image of growing up in the decade of greed. But don't fret if Andrew McCarthy, Molly Ringwald, Judd Nelson, Rob Lowe and Ally Sheedy have slipped your mind. Like Duran Duran and Milli Vanilli, they were eminently forgettable. Their movies were soapy. Their dialogue was dippy. Their hair was perfect.Alas, the 1990s is serving up a scruffier, more notable set of young actors.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 29, 1996
"Flirting With Disaster" does in fact flirt with disaster, in its very choice of forms. It's farce, one of those mad whirligigs that takes a single slightly illogical premise and punches it out toward infinity, based on the mad optimism that its creators can continue to crank and twist the plot in ever more absurd ways until it resembles a map of DNA as drawn by a chimp. But it can't just be fast and frantic. It's also got to be funny.Well, it's funny as hell and that's all there is to it.Written and directed by the frighteningly talented David O. Russell, who unleashed "Spanking the Monkey" on an unsuspecting world, this one watches as a moony, self-obsessed young man takes his wife on a cross-country odyssey in search of his real parents (he was given up for adoption)
FEATURES
March 31, 2008
The pseudo-improvised reality series The Hills, as it plays out beyond MTV on tabloid covers, is back stronger than ever after a three-month hiatus. Last Monday's return averaged 4.8 million total viewers, a new high for the show. The Hills, set among young aspirants of the Hollywood Hills music and fashion industries, continues to track the emotional warfare between former best friends Lauren Conrad and Heidi Montag while delving more deeply into the twistedness, gaslighting and superficiality of the boyfriends who ensure that the tortured rivals treat each other like Crips and Bloods.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 28, 2004
Poised on the brink of movie stardom, Thomas Jane is a man to be envied. He's got the looks, he's got the career, he's got the glamorous fiancee (actor Patricia Arquette) and the cute young daughter, 14-month-old Harlow. But consider what it took for him to become what he is - dropping out of school at 16, sleeping on the streets of L.A., eating out of garbage cans, living off the residuals of playing a guy in a chicken suit. For all the dues-paying he's done, success may be the least he deserves.
FEATURES
March 6, 2006
Critic's Pick-- Seeking the brother of the DA's buddy, Allison (Patricia Arquette, above) becomes delusional in Medium (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11).
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 28, 2004
Poised on the brink of movie stardom, Thomas Jane is a man to be envied. He's got the looks, he's got the career, he's got the glamorous fiancee (actor Patricia Arquette) and the cute young daughter, 14-month-old Harlow. But consider what it took for him to become what he is - dropping out of school at 16, sleeping on the streets of L.A., eating out of garbage cans, living off the residuals of playing a guy in a chicken suit. For all the dues-paying he's done, success may be the least he deserves.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 18, 2003
Holes, based on a beloved, award-winning children's book, is so faithful to its source that legions of schoolkids and their teachers will clasp it to their hearts. After all, it's a glorified set of illustrations that will extend, or at least not get in the way of, their original reading experience. Those who come to the movie cold will find it an exasperating assembly of brutal pedantry and whimsies, boasting far less charm or grace than even the first Harry Potter picture. It's partly a broad satire on teen boot camps: The hero, Stanley Yelnats (Shia LaBeouf)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 29, 1996
"Flirting With Disaster" does in fact flirt with disaster, in its very choice of forms. It's farce, one of those mad whirligigs that takes a single slightly illogical premise and punches it out toward infinity, based on the mad optimism that its creators can continue to crank and twist the plot in ever more absurd ways until it resembles a map of DNA as drawn by a chimp. But it can't just be fast and frantic. It's also got to be funny.Well, it's funny as hell and that's all there is to it.Written and directed by the frighteningly talented David O. Russell, who unleashed "Spanking the Monkey" on an unsuspecting world, this one watches as a moony, self-obsessed young man takes his wife on a cross-country odyssey in search of his real parents (he was given up for adoption)
FEATURES
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,Boston Globe | February 13, 1994
Remember the Brat Pack, that very hot "Breakfast Club" of 1980s actors who made youth look like a Coors beer commercial?They were America's favorite image of growing up in the decade of greed. But don't fret if Andrew McCarthy, Molly Ringwald, Judd Nelson, Rob Lowe and Ally Sheedy have slipped your mind. Like Duran Duran and Milli Vanilli, they were eminently forgettable. Their movies were soapy. Their dialogue was dippy. Their hair was perfect.Alas, the 1990s is serving up a scruffier, more notable set of young actors.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.