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By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 8, 1992
MOSCOW -- To the outside world he has been known as Alexei II, the patriarch of Moscow and all Russia, head of the Russian Orthodox Church and its tens of millions of believers.But to the KGB, he was "Drozdov," the code name the Soviet secret police gave to an agent who served them well for more than a quarter-century, according to church dissidents and some lawmakers."Drozdov" surfaces often in KGB reports about high-level agents inside the Russian Orthodox Church, they say.In October 1969, KGB archives show that "Drozdov" went to England for a meeting of the European Conference of Churches, bringing back information "about certain persons of interest to the KGB."
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2012
Joseph Claver Richardson, a retired teacher and World War II veteran who was the patriarch of a family of nearly 60 children and grandchildren, died of cardiac arrest related to asthma Jan. 8 at Sinai Hospital. He was 89 and lived in Walbrook Junction. Born in Baltimore and raised on Madison Avenue, he attended St. Peter Claver and St. Pius V schools. According to a 1944 Afro-American article, he had been recommended for ordination to the Roman Catholic priesthood by Archbishop Michael J. Curley.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | October 17, 1993
About 30 protesters shut down the black-tie opening of an exhibit of Ethiopian sacred art in downtown Baltimore last night, charging that gallery officials should not have invited a controversial church patriarch to the city.Walters Art Gallery officials turned away 2,000 guests at the door, saying they could not guarantee the safety of Patriarch Abune Paulos, leader of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, or of other guests.But "African Zion: The Sacred Art of Ethiopia," an exhibit pulled together from 10 museums around the world, will be open this morning and will remain in Baltimore until Jan. 9 without Patriarch Paulos.
SPORTS
By Sam Farmer, Tribune Newspapers | December 19, 2010
There's something about Archie Manning's easygoing drawl that makes you think nothing gets him too bothered. But don't be fooled. He's as antsy as you might expect the father of two NFL quarterbacks to be at this time of year, especially with Peyton and Eli Manning heading into the biggest games of the season. Archie and his wife, Olivia, will be in Indianapolis on Sunday to watch Peyton and the Colts in a do-or-die game against the Jaguars. In their direct line of vision will be a TV tuned to the Giants game at the same time, with Eli facing the Eagles for first place in the NFC East.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2005
Drink no longer water, but use a little wine for thy stomach's sake and thine often infirmities. - I Timothy 5:23 I hope at some point during the Great Grapes! Wine, Arts & Food Festival that begins at noon today and continues tomorrow at Oregon Ridge Park in Cockeysville, someone will lift a glass to the memory of the late Philip Marshall Wagner. Wagner, who died in 1996 and was considered the patriarch of eastern winemaking, established Boordy Vineyards in 1945 at his 4.7-acre home in Riderwood, where he lived until his death.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun Reporter | July 31, 2008
John Bruce Johnson, a retired teacher whom friends called the "patriarch of community theater in Baltimore," died of dementia Sunday at Seasons Hospice and Palliative Care. The Canton resident was 77. "The Vagabond [Players] claim to be the oldest continuously running little theater in the country, and Johnson is really only the second long-term leader it has had in its 82 years," said a 1998 Sun profile of him. The paper's story went on to describe him as "an oddly typical old-time amiable Baltimorean with old-time Baltimore idiosyncrasies.
NEWS
July 18, 1995
Sara Roberts Church, 81, who worked for Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard M. Nixon and was the first black woman elected to Tennessee's Republican State Executive Committee, died of cancer Saturday in Memphis.Victor Polley, 79, former administrator of Canada's Stratford Festival, died of a heart attack Wednesday at his summer home on Lake Huron. He joined the Shakespearean festival in 1954, one year after it started. After leaving the festival in 1970, he was general manager of Toronto's St. Lawrence Center for the Arts.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1998
Cardinal William H. Keeler returned this week to Baltimore from Istanbul, Turkey, where, as emissary for Pope John Paul II, he and a delegation continued to build relations between Roman Catholics and Orthodox Christians.Meeting with Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I, the spiritual leader of the world's Orthodox Christians, Keeler delivered a letter from John Paul, who expressed hope that the denominations might achieve full unity.John Paul said in his letter that the churches' respective patron saints should remind both sects of their common mission.
NEWS
October 19, 1993
The exhibition of Ethiopian Christian art at the Walters Art Gallery is a first of its kind in this country. It shows a tradition sustained across the milleniums in the mountain fastness of the Horn of Africa. Rulers of Ethiopia and the Eastern Roman Empire in Greece converted to Christianity in the fourth century. Their traditions of Christian art began similarly and developed separately.The catalog and exhibition, which will tour next year, contribute to knowledge in ways that art exhibitions rarely do, because much of the art has never been out of Ethiopia before.
NEWS
July 2, 1995
The four-day visit to Pope John Paul II at the Vatican by the Ecumenical Patriarch Batholomew I, from Istanbul, should guide the Roman Catholics of Central Europe and Orthodox Christians of Eastern Europe. This was only the third meeting of a pope and the first among equals of Orthodox primates since the Great Schism of 1054.It is unlikely they will unify their institutions into a single church by the year 2000, as the pope appears more eager than the patriarch to accomplish. But they have already, as symbolized in joint celebration of Mass, vigorously pushed reconciliation of their two great Christian traditions, building on ecumenical explorations begun in the 1960s.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2010
Baltimore Circuit Court clerk and frequent mayoral candidate Frank M. Conaway Sr. announced Friday that he plans to seek the city's highest office again next year. Conaway, 77, who has been involved in city politics for four decades, said in a statement that his decision to run was inspired by his recent primary victory in his re-election campaign. As clerk of the court, Conaway oversees a budget of $10.5 million and a staff of more than 250. "I owe no allegiances to special interest groups, have no political ax to grind, and will work with robust energy and years of relevant experience to bridge the gaps in the economic, education, health care, criminal justice and community pride that presently divides our city into two camps — the haves and the have-nots," Conaway said in the statement.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | October 21, 2009
Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, the global leader of the 300 million-member Orthodox Christian Church, will visit Sts. Constantine and Helen Church in Annapolis next month as part of his sixth visit to the United States. Styled "The Green Patriarch," the ecologically aware Bartholomew was to arrive in New Orleans on Tuesday to preside over the eighth Religion, Science and the Environment Symposium around the subject of "Restoring Balance: The Great Mississippi River." He is to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the enthronement of Archbishop Demetrios of America as the primate of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America next week in New York.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun Reporter | July 31, 2008
John Bruce Johnson, a retired teacher whom friends called the "patriarch of community theater in Baltimore," died of dementia Sunday at Seasons Hospice and Palliative Care. The Canton resident was 77. "The Vagabond [Players] claim to be the oldest continuously running little theater in the country, and Johnson is really only the second long-term leader it has had in its 82 years," said a 1998 Sun profile of him. The paper's story went on to describe him as "an oddly typical old-time amiable Baltimorean with old-time Baltimore idiosyncrasies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL BARNETT and MICHAEL BARNETT,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2006
When actors have repeated success in one genre of entertainment, often they get typecast, stuck playing the same character again and again in different movies or shows. Scott Bakula, star of the late-'80s hit show Quantum Leap and the most recent Star Trek series, Enterprise, proves even a sci-fi master can find success in a myriad of genres and mediums. At 51, Bakula makes a leap back to his roots in theater, starring in the Tony Award-winning Civil War musical Shenandoah, running tomorrow through April 30 at Ford's Theatre in Washington.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2005
William Boniface, retired racing editor of The Evening Sun and patriarch of a Maryland family whose horse-breeding successes included a winner of the Preakness Stakes, died of a liver disease yesterday at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Churchville resident was 89. Mr. Boniface, who covered racing from 1937 until he retired in 1982, was a co-owner of 1983 Preakness winner Deputed Testamony. He also owned Bonita Farm, the Harford County horse-breeding operation now owned by his son, three grandsons, two great-grandsons and their wives.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2005
Drink no longer water, but use a little wine for thy stomach's sake and thine often infirmities. - I Timothy 5:23 I hope at some point during the Great Grapes! Wine, Arts & Food Festival that begins at noon today and continues tomorrow at Oregon Ridge Park in Cockeysville, someone will lift a glass to the memory of the late Philip Marshall Wagner. Wagner, who died in 1996 and was considered the patriarch of eastern winemaking, established Boordy Vineyards in 1945 at his 4.7-acre home in Riderwood, where he lived until his death.
NEWS
September 16, 2004
Kenny Buttrey, 59, a drummer who recorded hits with Bob Dylan, Neil Young and Jimmy Buffett, died of cancer Sunday in Nashville, Tenn. Mr. Buttrey worked much of his career in Nashville recording studios, providing the percussion for albums including Mr. Dylan's Nashville Skyline and Blonde on Blonde, and Mr. Young's Harvest. His drummer credits also include Mr. Buffett's "Margaritaville" and Robert Knight's "Everlasting Love." James David Barber, 74, a retired Duke University political scientist who won national attention for his observations on the personalities of presidents, died Sunday in Durham, N.C. In 1972, he published The Presidential Character: Predicting Performance in the White House, which proposed that a president's character, world view and personal style determines his approach to duties in office.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | January 27, 1992
Moscow -- IT WAS A cold Saturday morning at the Yelachovskaya Cathedral, an exquisite ocean-green church where the bearded, 62-year-old Russian Orthodox patriarch, Aleksy II, celebrates the seat and the holidays of his faith.These streets of "storii Moskba," or "Old Moscow," remind one that there still can be beauty here. The pastel-colored old mansions of this sector shame the gray utilitarianism of the rest of the city.In this Orthodox Church reborn in the liberalizing Gorbachev era, the gold walls and ceilings gleam in the flickering candlelight as voices are raised to heaven.
FEATURES
By Dennis McLellan and Dennis McLellan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 25, 2005
Sir John Mills, the Academy Award-winning actor and patriarch of one of Britain's leading theatrical families, died Saturday. He was 97. Mills, the father of actresses Hayley and Juliet Mills, died at his home in Denham, west of London, following a short illness. Knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1976, Mills' career spanned more than 70 years and more than 100 movies. Mills won a best supporting actor Oscar and a Golden Globe for his role as the brain-damaged, mute villager in Ryan's Daughter, David Lean's 1970 romantic drama set in Ireland during World War I. On film, Mills was best known for portraying rather ordinary men who display, as one observer once put it, "the qualities of English decency operating at every level of society."
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 15, 2005
NEW YORK - Maurice R. Greenberg, the executive who built American International Group into a global insurance powerhouse and shaped an entire industry during nearly 40 years at the company's helm, stepped down as chief executive yesterday after a series of run-ins with regulators raised questions about its complex and often obscure operations. His exit came after lengthy discussions by the company's directors in recent days and appeared intended to avert a head-on collision with two regulators: the Securities and Exchange Commission and Eliot Spitzer, the New York attorney general.
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