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By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | February 27, 1991
John E.C. Patmore will be the new Annapolis public works director, ajob he was asked to resign eight years ago.The City Council voted, 7-1 with one abstention, to confirm Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins' appointment. Patmore will be paid $68,965 a year, about $1,000 more than he was earning as an engineer for Dewberry & Davis, an Annapolis engineering firm. He starts Monday.The council met privately for 30 minutes Monday night to discuss Patmore's appointment, then voted in open session.Alderman John R. Hammond, R-Ward 1, said he voted against Patmore because he wanted a more rigorous selection process, like the one used to hire Police Chief Harold Robbins last year.
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NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | June 22, 2007
Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer yesterday notified the city's acting director of public works that his contract would not be renewed, three days after he harshly criticized one of her pet projects, though she denies there is a connection. It is the third time that John E. C. Patmore, who has worked for city government since 1980, has been let go by an Annapolis mayor. He will remain on the job until July 1. Moyer said her decision not to renew Patmore's contract was unrelated to his stance on the triathlon and noted the need to take the department in a more tech-savvy direction.
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NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | February 24, 1991
Annapolis Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins' top choice to be the city's new public works director was asked to resign from the same job eight years ago by former Mayor Richard Hillman.The City Council will discuss in a closed session tomorrow night the appointment of John E. C. Patmore, 56, who was public works director from 1980 to 1983. If ratified by the council, Patmore would replace William Campbell, who retired last month.The public works employees' union, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, has lobbied heavily against Patmore's appointment.
NEWS
By Joe Palazzolo and Joe Palazzolo,Special to The Sun | January 7, 2007
While the cost of improving City Dock has soared to nearly $9 million, the brunt of the project is expected to be completed in half as much time as originally planned to accommodate Annapolis' tourism calendar, according to city officials. In the lull between the powerboat show in October and the Maritime Heritage Festival in May 2008 - two of the city's largest tourist draws - two barge crews will work simultaneously, spearing new bulkheads and sheet pilings through the soupy soil on the bay floor in the project's main phase.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | June 22, 2007
Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer yesterday notified the city's acting director of public works that his contract would not be renewed, three days after he harshly criticized one of her pet projects, though she denies there is a connection. It is the third time that John E. C. Patmore, who has worked for city government since 1980, has been let go by an Annapolis mayor. He will remain on the job until July 1. Moyer said her decision not to renew Patmore's contract was unrelated to his stance on the triathlon and noted the need to take the department in a more tech-savvy direction.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
Mayor's joke eases tension at meeting on garbage collectionThe room was packed with garbage haulers whose jobs were on the line. But for one moment during the three-hour public hearing at Annapolis' City Hall, the stern faces relaxed into smiles.Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins cracked a wry joke that caused the standing-room-only audience Monday night to burst into loud laughter.John E. C. Patmore, the city's director of public works, stopped testifying at the hearing on privatizing Annapolis' garbage collection when he noticed Mr. Hopkins reach toward his chest.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1995
Annapolis Alderman M. Theresa DeGraff, whose complaints led city officials to hire a private company to collect garbage at 4,000 homes Christmas weekend, is the wife of a manager at the firm that got the job.John Patmore, city public works director, said Friday that he hired Browning-Ferris Industries Inc. without getting estimates from other companies after Ms. DeGraff called to complain that trash had not been picked up at half the homes in the city.He...
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1997
About $1.5 million in state money for Annapolis' proposed $4.9 million traffic circle on West Street might be jeopardized because of two flaws in the new design plans, city department heads said yesterday.An island on the south side of the proposed West Street-Taylor Avenue gateway circle and plans to designate the circular island in the middle of the intersection as a gathering place for pedestrians will cause major traffic problems, Public Works Director John E. C. Patmore told members of the city council yesterday.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1995
Annapolis Alderman M. Theresa DeGraff, whose complaints led city officials to hire a private company to collect garbage at 4,000 homes Christmas weekend, is the wife of a manager at the firm that got the job.John Patmore, city public works director, said Friday that he hired Browning-Ferris Industries Inc. without getting estimates from other companies after Ms. DeGraff called to complain that trash had not been picked up at half the homes in the city.He...
NEWS
January 4, 1996
EVERYONE AGREES (or should) that conflicts of interest are unacceptable in politics. Too often, however, we assume automatically that a conflict of interest signals corruption -- the deliberate use of a public office for personal benefit. Dealing with politicians who overtly misuse their position is easy; we throw the bums out. Situations in which elected leaders stumble into a conflict, as Annapolis Alderman M. Theresa DeGraff did over the Christmas holiday, are stickier.Ms. DeGraff's husband is a manager at Browning-Ferris Industries Inc., a private trash hauler.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1997
About $1.5 million in state money for Annapolis' proposed $4.9 million traffic circle on West Street might be jeopardized because of two flaws in the new design plans, city department heads said yesterday.An island on the south side of the proposed West Street-Taylor Avenue gateway circle and plans to designate the circular island in the middle of the intersection as a gathering place for pedestrians will cause major traffic problems, Public Works Director John E. C. Patmore told members of the city council yesterday.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1996
Annapolis Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins' daughter is a captain in the city Police Department. Alderman M. Theresa DeGraff's husband is a local manager for trash-hauling giant Browning-Ferris Industries. And Alderman Louise Hammond's husband is Anne Arundel County's finance officer.Yet they vote on police issues, trash removal contracts and city-county relations.They won't be able to do that any more if a measure to come before the city council tonight is approved.The bill, introduced more than a year ago, would forbid council members from voting on issues in which a relative might have an interest.
NEWS
January 4, 1996
EVERYONE AGREES (or should) that conflicts of interest are unacceptable in politics. Too often, however, we assume automatically that a conflict of interest signals corruption -- the deliberate use of a public office for personal benefit. Dealing with politicians who overtly misuse their position is easy; we throw the bums out. Situations in which elected leaders stumble into a conflict, as Annapolis Alderman M. Theresa DeGraff did over the Christmas holiday, are stickier.Ms. DeGraff's husband is a manager at Browning-Ferris Industries Inc., a private trash hauler.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1995
Annapolis Alderman M. Theresa DeGraff, whose complaints led city officials to hire a private company to collect garbage at 4,000 homes Christmas weekend, is the wife of a manager at the firm that got the job.John Patmore, city public works director, said Friday that he hired Browning-Ferris Industries Inc. without getting estimates from other companies after Ms. DeGraff called to complain that trash had not been picked up at half the homes in the city.He...
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1995
Annapolis Alderman M. Theresa DeGraff, whose complaints led city officials to hire a private company to collect garbage at 4,000 homes Christmas weekend, is the wife of a manager at the firm that got the job.John Patmore, city public works director, said Friday that he hired Browning-Ferris Industries Inc. without getting estimates from other companies after Ms. DeGraff called to complain that trash had not been picked up at half the homes in the city.He...
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | November 22, 1993
A West Annapolis resident has objected to new stop signs posted on Annapolis Street at Giddings Avenue, prompting the city and a neighborhood association to poll the community.Richard Kibbe of Shiley Street petitioned the city council to remove the signs, which were posted late last month, after his wife's car was nearly hit as she passed through the intersection."The concern is the potential for a serious accident," Mr. Kibbe said. "I wonder how a stop sign can be placed without a traffic study and without consulting the neighborhood or businesses."
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | November 22, 1993
A West Annapolis resident has objected to new stop signs posted on Annapolis Street at Giddings Avenue, prompting the city and a neighborhood association to poll the community.Richard Kibbe of Shiley Street petitioned the city council to remove the signs, which were posted late last month, after his wife's car was nearly hit as she passed through the intersection."The concern is the potential for a serious accident," Mr. Kibbe said. "I wonder how a stop sign can be placed without a traffic study and without consulting the neighborhood or businesses."
NEWS
By Joe Palazzolo and Joe Palazzolo,Special to The Sun | January 7, 2007
While the cost of improving City Dock has soared to nearly $9 million, the brunt of the project is expected to be completed in half as much time as originally planned to accommodate Annapolis' tourism calendar, according to city officials. In the lull between the powerboat show in October and the Maritime Heritage Festival in May 2008 - two of the city's largest tourist draws - two barge crews will work simultaneously, spearing new bulkheads and sheet pilings through the soupy soil on the bay floor in the project's main phase.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
Mayor's joke eases tension at meeting on garbage collectionThe room was packed with garbage haulers whose jobs were on the line. But for one moment during the three-hour public hearing at Annapolis' City Hall, the stern faces relaxed into smiles.Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins cracked a wry joke that caused the standing-room-only audience Monday night to burst into loud laughter.John E. C. Patmore, the city's director of public works, stopped testifying at the hearing on privatizing Annapolis' garbage collection when he noticed Mr. Hopkins reach toward his chest.
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | February 27, 1991
John E.C. Patmore will be the new Annapolis public works director, ajob he was asked to resign eight years ago.The City Council voted, 7-1 with one abstention, to confirm Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins' appointment. Patmore will be paid $68,965 a year, about $1,000 more than he was earning as an engineer for Dewberry & Davis, an Annapolis engineering firm. He starts Monday.The council met privately for 30 minutes Monday night to discuss Patmore's appointment, then voted in open session.Alderman John R. Hammond, R-Ward 1, said he voted against Patmore because he wanted a more rigorous selection process, like the one used to hire Police Chief Harold Robbins last year.
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