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By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Johns Hopkins plans to use a $10 million gift to launch an institute for patient safety, aiming to reduce medical mistakes that have long troubled health care facilities around the nation. The Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality will conduct research and develop methods for use at Hopkins and other hospitals around the globe that could prevent infections, misdiagnoses, improper treatments and other errors. It may be the first of its kind in the country, Hopkins and patient advocates say. "Fewer things are more important in health care right now than improving patient safety and the quality of health care," Dr. Edward D. Miller, dean and chief executive of Johns Hopkins Medicine, said in a statement.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
The practitioner of a now-closed Catonsville laser surgery center who was convicted of raping a woman at gunpoint in 1987 was indicted by an Allegany County grand jury last week for sexually assaulting a patient behind locked doors. Dr. William Thomas Dando, 59, faces two charges related to the alleged incident April 6 at MedExpress Urgent Care Center in LaVale, just west of Cumberland. The victim, a 41-year-old woman, told the Allegany County sheriff's office that after a nurse left the exam room, the doctor locked a door and assaulted her. Dando was released and is scheduled to appear in court next month, under an indictment filed May 23. He could not be reached for comment.
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NEWS
By Abby Bernstein | May 22, 2013
In 1988, I became extremely ill. I had many tests, saw many doctors and was given various medicines. Some caused allergic reactions. Through it all, I remained sick — and actually became worse. Eventually, I was diagnosed with autoimmune hepatitis, a very rare disorder. Much of the information I read said I had about 10 years to live. Making matters worse, I was soon diagnosed with another autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). My treatment options for RA were severely limited because of my autoimmune hepatitis, as most of the RA drugs would filter through the liver and could initiate another attack.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
Sinai Hospital of Baltimore launched an incentive program this week to encourage nurses to discharge more patients by noon, prompting questions about patient safety. The program sets a goal for nursing units to discharge 20 percent of their patients by noon and offers the nurse on each unit with the most early discharges a $10 gift card. An executive with LifeBridge Health, which owns Sinai, said the goals were taken out of context. The hospital was responding to patient concerns that they wanted to leave the hospital sooner after procedures, said Debbie Hollenstein, LifeBridge vice president of marketing.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2003
Maryland doesn't have any money for an initiative it considers a "centerpiece" of efforts to keep health care facilities from harming patients, but it's trying an unusual plan to go ahead anyway. On Tuesday, the Maryland Health Care Commission plans to open bids from nonprofit groups and academic institutions vying to operate a statewide center that would analyze medical errors and other incidents that hurt patients or barely miss doing so. Instead of money, the winning bidder will get the right to call itself the Maryland Patient Safety Center.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2004
The beginning of an ambitious drive to reduce medical mistakes in Maryland hospitals and nursing homes is embodied in the humble maiden voyages of Dr. William F. Minogue, a career hospital man who is the first - and so far the only - employee of the Maryland Patient Safety Center. His rolling office is the Toyota minivan, sans rear seats, that his wife uses to transport the family's spaniels. So far, he carries only a briefcase, his experience and an underfunded plan for overcoming the medical errors that harm untold numbers of Maryland patients annually.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2003
For all the focus on reducing medical errors in recent years, the cultural changes that institutions must make to keep patients safe have been slow to develop. The gravity of the problem was highlighted this week in the case of a 17-year-old girl who was given a heart and lungs from an organ donor of the wrong blood type at Duke University Hospital. More than three years after the Institute of Medicine released a headline-grabbing report on the frequency of errors and a plan for reducing them, some medical experts say progress has been limited.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2005
"Push, push, push, push," urges Dr. Deborah Milstein. "Harder, harder, harder." Christina Creegan, 22, of Essex, is in the final minutes of labor. Male relatives huddle in a corner of the labor suite, but the women crowd around the bedside. Each of Creegan's two sisters aims a video camera; her mother-in-law and stepmother-in-law lean in with digital still cameras. "It's going to be a well-documented baby," says Cathy Clevenstine, the stepmother-in-law. Well-documented, indeed, in ways that go well beyond the big, cheerful family armed with multiple cameras.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | May 7, 2008
Deborah A. Krohn, a nurse who used her legal training to advise medical colleagues on patient safety, died April 30 at Johns Hopkins Hospital of sepsis related to complications of a liver transplant. The Pikesville resident was 54. Ms. Krohn often spoke to medical groups throughout the country on patient issues and how health care providers could avoid medical errors. She was a nurse at Johns Hopkins Hospital before earning a law degree a decade ago. She left nursing to pursue a legal career, only to return a few years later.
NEWS
By From staff reports | December 8, 2003
In Maryland Organizations bid to run new patient safety center Although Maryland doesn't plan to pay a dime to the organization it chooses to run a new patient safety center, that hasn't dissuaded organizations from bidding, the state's chief health care regulator said last week. But Barbara McLean, executive director of the Maryland Health Care Commission, said procurement regulations prohibit her from saying who bid, or the number of bids received, until a winner is selected. That likely won't be until late this month or early next month.
NEWS
By Abby Bernstein | May 22, 2013
In 1988, I became extremely ill. I had many tests, saw many doctors and was given various medicines. Some caused allergic reactions. Through it all, I remained sick — and actually became worse. Eventually, I was diagnosed with autoimmune hepatitis, a very rare disorder. Much of the information I read said I had about 10 years to live. Making matters worse, I was soon diagnosed with another autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). My treatment options for RA were severely limited because of my autoimmune hepatitis, as most of the RA drugs would filter through the liver and could initiate another attack.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 13, 2013
John Hopkins Medicine International entered into a collaboration with a network of Peruvian hospitals in an effort to improve medical services in the area. The deal with Pacífico S.A. Entidad Prestadora de Salud also includes making improvements at an oncology clinic, clinical and pathology laboratories and outpatient centers that have recently been acquired by Pacífico Salud. One of the main goals of the partnership will be accreditation of the hospitals. The organizations will also work on strengthening patient safety, operation and the infrastructure for delivering care.  “This important endeavor is designed to raise the quality of health care services across a vast and committed corps of caregivers,” Steven J. Thompson, chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine International, said in a statement. 
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2012
Johns Hopkins will use an $8.9 million gift to make intensive care units safer for patients, expanding on the institution's past work to reduce medical mistakes that have long troubled hospitals. The grant is part of a 10-year, $500 million program — called the Patient Care Program — announced Tuesday by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to eliminate all preventable harm to patients in hospitals. The program seeks to improve health outcomes by eliminating medical error, better engaging patients in their care, and using technology to better coordinate patient care.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
Four Maryland hospitals are offering free hepatitis C testing to at least 1,750 patients who may have been exposed to the viral disease by a traveling medical technician, as state officials launch a broad regulatory review in response to the case. The testing and review follow the arrest of David Matthew Kwiatkowski in New Hampshire last month. Authorities say he injected himself with stolen narcotics-filled syringes while working at a hospital there and left the contaminated needles to be re-used by unwitting staff in patients, infecting at least 30 people.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
Four doctor groups across Maryland have been chosen by the federal Department of Health and Human Services for a program that aims to cut health costs and better coordinate care for Medicare recipients. The program named 89 new groups in 40 states to become Accountable Care Organizations under the federal health care reform law. That brings the total already signed up for the voluntary program to 154, according to federal health officials. The groups share in savings realized through the more coordinated care.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
A city water main break in the 5400 block of West Forest Park Avenue closed roads Wednesday and cut off supply to several homes and a day-care center in the Windsor Mills neighborhood. The 20-inch main, which broke during the early morning hours, has also caused some water outages at Kernan Hospital, although there has been no impact to patient safety, officials said. "The hospital is functioning normally," said Kurt Kocher, spokesman for the Baltimore City Department of Public Works.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
There was a significant uptick in the number of serious problems reported by Maryland hospitals in fiscal 2010, according to the annual report on patient care and safety released by state health officials. There were 265 top level adverse events reported in 2010, compared with 190 the year before. Health officials attributed the rise to better identification and reporting rather than more problems – particularly when it came to pressure ulcers. Falls remained the No. 1 adverse event at the hospital.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2011
Johns Hopkins intensive care nurse Nelly E. Lopez spends so much of her workday monitoring patient distress alarms that she sometimes hears phantom beeps even when she is no longer on the job. Hopkins doctors say Lopez's "alarm fatigue" shows what is wrong with hospital intensive care units, which they describe as fragmented systems made up of dozens of machines that don't talk to one another. The constant alarms, invasive instruments and unwieldy number of machines create a stressful, and sometimes unsafe, environment for the medical staff as well as ICU patients, who are the ones in most critical condition.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
Maryland hospitals have become more aggressive in recent years about vaccinating workers for the flu, but public health officials are pushing for even stricter programs to halt the spread of a virus that kills thousands each year. As manufacturers have begun shipping vaccine for the 2011-2012 flu season and vaccination programs are being planned, some officials are pushing hospitals to make vaccinations mandatory for employees. They say the vaccine is the most effective means of protecting workers and adds a crucial layer of safety for highly vulnerable patients such as newborns, the elderly and those with compromised immune systems.
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