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By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1994
The conflict between Raymond Jackson and Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital illustrates some of the emotional issues that hospitals face as families take a more aggressive role in patient care, medical ethicists say."Part of good health care is having family involved in the care," said James Nelson of the Hastings Center, an independent, nonprofit research and educational organization in New York that examines ethical issues in medical and life sciences.But when a family's demands absorb an inordinate amount of staff time, "then it's reasonable to find some alternatives," he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 18, 2014
The nurses at Emory Hospital who are caring for the two U.S. Ebola patients around the clock are not immune from fear. No nurses are. The truth stares us in the face every time an indiscriminate killer like Ebola or any horrific strain goes viral. Nurses are so often the first to reach the front lines of an epidemic, the first to recognize and try to relieve patient pain and the first to get to work healing the sick regardless of the challenges and obstacles. Whether it's in Atlanta or Africa, nurses are right now at the bedside dealing with the danger of a disease spread through contact with blood, vomit, saliva and diarrhea.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1997
The state agency that licenses doctors may discipline physicians only when their conduct is linked to the diagnosis and care of patients, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals has ruled.The court reversed two of three 1994 findings of misconduct against Lester H. Banks, a Carroll County doctor, by the Board of Physician Quality Assurance. Those findings were upheld last year by the Carroll County Circuit Court.But the state's second-highest court affirmed a finding of sexual harassment against the Westminster physician, based on one woman's complaints.
NEWS
May 13, 2014
Johns Hopkins Hospital's refusal to openly negotiate with its underpaid health care workers is beyond embarrassing but unfortunately revealing of some of the real operating values of this world class institution ( "Thousands gather to protest pay at Hopkins Hospital," May 10). As its' own Bloomberg School of Public Health has researched and demonstrated again and again, one's environment is as important a determinant of health as what goes on inside one's body. Workers who come in every day exhausted, stressed and worried about their family's welfare cannot portray an example of health and well being that the hospital portends is one of its primary values.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1997
About 60 newly hired nurse's aides are taking over some duties once handled by much more highly trained registered nurses at Howard County General Hospital, and some nurses say patient care is being sacrificed to save money.The hiring of the nurse's aides -- called patient care technicians (PCTs) -- has alarmed some of the hospital's more than 400 registered nurses, who say the aides are not adequately trained to monitor patients."The patients are getting substandard care," said a nurse at Howard County General who asked not to be identified for fear of retribution.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 14, 1996
After more than a quarter-century with little attention from the government, the quality of kidney dialysis in the United States is receiving scrutiny from the Clinton administration and Congress.The administration is preparing proposals to establish quality requirements for dialysis, a life-saving treatment for patients whose kidneys have failed.The proposals, which could be ready by March, would define such things as the results that must be achieved in certain blood tests indicating the quality of dialysis.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2003
State and national health care officials began looking into patient care at Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in Rockville yesterday in connection with allegations that a nurse there might have contributed to the deaths of one or more patients. The Maryland Office of Healthcare Quality and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations spent the day touring the hospital, examining patient charts and interviewing employees and patients about the hospital's delivery of services.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF Frank Roylance, Sun staff writer contributed to this article | November 21, 1996
As part of cutbacks at University of Maryland Medical System, the vaunted Maryland Shock Trauma Center is closing one 20-bed unit.John W. Ashworth III, director of the Shock Trauma Center, said the closing was a response to empty beds, as patients are discharged more quickly. The closing will mean a staff reduction in Shock Trauma of 66. Of those, half are nurses, aides and technicians, a reduction of 10 percent in direct patient care staff. The other half are in administration and support such as billing and information systems, a cut of 18.5 percent.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2013
Karen P. Vojtko, who was nurse manager of the cardiac-care and progressive-care units at the University of Maryland Medical Center, where her career spanned more than three decades, died Wednesday of cancer at her Abingdon home. She was 56. "Karen had passion, warmth and was caring. She saw her role at the medical center as looking after people," said David G. Hunt, director of nursing and patient care services for cardiac care and radiology at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | March 5, 1992
Confronting one of psychiatry's most wrenching problems, Maryland's medical disciplinary board has suspended the license of an esteemed psychiatrist who admitted to having a sexual affair with a patient suffering from depression and multiple personality disorder.Dr. John Hamilton, now forbidden to treat patients for at least a year, is the deputy medical director for the American Psychiatric Association who is credited with co-authoring an APA manual that set national standards for patient care.
NEWS
By Teddi Glaros Nicolaus | April 1, 2014
Co-founder, President and COO, AllCare of Maryland Urgent Care Centers and MediSpa, Columbia and Ellicott City allcareofmd.com What sparked your interest in your career field? Helping others and giving back to the community I live in has always been first and foremost on my mind. I wanted to open a community-based urgent care and wellness practice that would be focused on providing quality medical health care services seven days a week. Before opening our community-based AllCare of Maryland Urgent Care Centers, I was vice president of product marketing and management for CheckFree Corp.
NEWS
January 27, 2014
Fred Rasmussen 's reflections on the late Dr. Elmer Hoffman quite clearly characterized the very distinguished career and the many accomplishments of the Baltimore surgical icon ( "Dr. Elmer Hoffman, breast cancer surgeon," Jan. 22). However, it is with sweet sadness that we note that Dr. Hoffman's passing marks the end of a generation of general surgeons who practiced in our communities. These were the clinicians who "did it all" before the shift to super specialists and sub-specialists.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
A top official with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said Friday that a state plan to reduce hospital visits could serve as a national model for curbing costs while improving patient outcomes. Deputy Administrator and Director Jonathan Blum said the approach could disprove the notion that quality health care must be expensive. While other programs already have shown this across the country, he said, Maryland would be the first to test the premise statewide. "We want Maryland to be the basis for other states ... to test the boundaries of what it means to lower total cost of care and boost total quality of care," Blum said.
NEWS
By John Reid | November 14, 2013
A patient-care technician for the University of Maryland Medical System must update his skills regularly to keep his job, but he hasn't seen an update in his salary. Another UMMS technician must work at least two jobs to have any money left after paying basic living expenses. And a third caregiver, who has worked for the medical system for several years, can barely afford care for his family at the very hospital where he cares for others. For UMMS caregivers, is this situation fair, decent or moral?
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2013
Karen P. Vojtko, who was nurse manager of the cardiac-care and progressive-care units at the University of Maryland Medical Center, where her career spanned more than three decades, died Wednesday of cancer at her Abingdon home. She was 56. "Karen had passion, warmth and was caring. She saw her role at the medical center as looking after people," said David G. Hunt, director of nursing and patient care services for cardiac care and radiology at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Shortages of beds, doctors and nurses in the Baltimore VA Medical Center's emergency room resulted in nearly half of a sample of patients spending more than 6 hours at the facility, including one who waited more than 24 hours, according to a critical inspection report released this month. In that case, a 59-year-old woman who reported a racing and pounding heartbeat waited 24 hours, 8 minutes before being admitted to a unit where her heartbeat could be continuously monitored. In another example, a 52-year-old man with schizophrenia who expressed desires to kill himself or others waited 22 hours until he was transferred to a non-VA hospital for treatment.
EXPLORE
August 4, 2012
Jenna Beal, a registered nurse, was presented with Carroll Hospital Center's July Daisy Award — an honor given to a registered nurse or licensed practical nurse to recognize outstanding efforts in patient care. A nurse at the hospital since 2007, Beal was honored specifically for her care of a patient in the critical care unit and her compassion toward the patient's family members. "Jenna is an exceptional nurse who truly understands that providing exceptional patient care means not only attending to the needs of the patient but also assisting and showing compassion toward the patient's family," said Stephanie Reid, vice president of quality and chief nursing officer.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center has received a $20 million donation for pancreas cancer research and patient care, the largest donation for such research in its history. The award came from Albert P. "Skip" Viragh Jr., founder of Rockville-based Rydex Investment, a mutual fund investment company. Viragh, who died of the disease at 62, was a Hopkins patient. The money will fund the existing laboratory, expand clinical programs and contribute to new research at the newly named Skip Viragh Center for Pancreas Cancer Clinical Research and Patient Care.
NEWS
By Brian H. Avin and Ardis D. Hoven | September 10, 2013
More than 1 million men and women in Maryland have one thing in common: They are enrolled in Medicare or Tricare. These programs provide seniors, the disabled and military families the coverage they need to remain healthy and to access the care when they are sick or injured. In Maryland, a number of new health care payment and delivery models are being established to improve patient care and reduce health care costs under the Medicare system, but a broken Medicare payment formula threatens to disrupt the progress of these innovations.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
Tens of thousands of Marylanders will get rebates from their health insurance companies this summer under a provision in the Affordable Care Act that requires insurers to spend a certain amount on patient care and quality improvement. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said Tuesday that 149,961 Maryland residents would get rebates. The rebates, which average $143 per family, will go out by Aug. 1. The rebates will be given out as a check in the mail, a lump-sum reimbursement to the credit or debit card account the customer used to pay premiums, a reduction in premiums or an employer using the rebates to improve health coverage.
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