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By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Dr. Gary S. Hill, an internationally renowned renal pathologist and the former chief of pathology at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, died Tuesday from lung cancer. He was 74. Dr. Hill pioneered a new technique for biopsies of tissue, in addition to developing a system for identifying lupus and how far the disease had progressed in a patient. Colleagues and family described him as a man greatly interested in conversation and friends, traits that translated into the way he moved forward in his career.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2013
Dr. Lorenz E. Zimmerman, the founder of modern ophthalmic pathology, who spent his nearly 60-year career studying diseases of the eye, died March 16 of complications from an infection at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. He was 92. His wife of 53 years, Anastasia U. Zimmerman, a registered nurse who had served as a major with the Army Nurse Corps, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure, also at Blakehurst. She was 89. "Without a doubt, Dr. Zimmerman was the most influential eye pathologist in the last 150 years.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2002
Irene Berezesky, a longtime researcher and pathology instructor at the at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, died Thursday of cancer at the university's medical center. She was 66. Though she had only an undergraduate degree and broke into her field when few opportunities were available for women in science, she achieved prominence as an educator, author and researcher in a career that spanned four decades. She was also a devoted fan of the Baltimore Orioles, attending so many games over the years that she became well known to the ushers and vendors at Memorial Stadium and Camden Yards.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Dr. Gary S. Hill, an internationally renowned renal pathologist and the former chief of pathology at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, died Tuesday from lung cancer. He was 74. Dr. Hill pioneered a new technique for biopsies of tissue, in addition to developing a system for identifying lupus and how far the disease had progressed in a patient. Colleagues and family described him as a man greatly interested in conversation and friends, traits that translated into the way he moved forward in his career.
NEWS
September 12, 1990
Graveside services for Dr. Gordon E. Madge, a native of Baltimore and professor of pathology at the Medical College of Virginia, will be held at 1 p.m. today at St. John's Episcopal Church, 9120 Frederick Road, Ellicott City.Dr. Madge, who was 63, died Monday at his home in Richmond, Va., after a long illness.On the faculty of the Richmond school since 1959, he also had been professor of ophthalmology and microbiology since 1975.An expert on Reye's syndrome, the disease that sometimes follows a viral illness in children, he also lectured widely at other medical schools and hospitals, including the University of Maryland in the 1970s.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 20, 2005
WHAT'S THE city to do about that group of budding pathologists sprouting up in East Baltimore? Why, nurture them to maturity, of course. Candice McDonald, Anthony Jordan, Gregory Mason and Tearra Boone want to be microbiologists. Aleshia Patton and James Conway are interested in hematology. Kelisa Watkins wants to do autopsies, as does Lauren Babcock. Babcock, along with Antonia Anderson, is also interested in anatomic pathology. If Christelle Yemeck and Levina Crumpton have their druthers, they'll both be working in histology after completing school.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2004
Arecent obituary for Mardi E. Fiocco, a former Westminster registered nurse and amateur criminologist, mentioned her interest in the role forensic pathology plays in solving crimes. And to gain further experience in this field, Fiocco spent a year studying with Dr. Russell S. Fisher, who was Maryland's medical examiner for 35 years, until his death in 1984. Fisher, who liked to call himself a "medical detective," managed during his more than three decades of service to transform the state medical examiner's office into one of the premier units in the country, earning himself a national reputation as a forensic pathologist and teacher.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | February 29, 2008
Dr. Benjamin Franklin Trump, the retired pathology department chair at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, died of heart disease Tuesday at Sinai Hospital. The Roland Park resident was 75. He was also among the founders of the Shock Trauma Center and worked closely with Dr. R Adams Cowley to create the Shock Trauma research program. He was a past chairman of the state's Postmortem Examiners Commission, where he oversaw the office of Maryland's chief medical examiner. "While at Maryland, Dr. Trump was able to bring the fields of electron microscopy, immunohistology, human cell and tissue culture and computer science into the forefront of pathology for both research and patient care," said Dr. Raymond Jones, a former student who is now professor of pathology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a Westminster resident.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2010
Dr. Grover M. Hutchins, who had been director of autopsy services at Johns Hopkins Hospital and was a world-renowned pathologist in the field of cardiac and pediatric pathology, died April 27 at a hospital in Windhoek, Namibia, from head injuries sustained in a fall. He was 77. The longtime resident of the Warrington Condominiums in Guilford was on a world cruise with his wife of 53 years, the former Loretta Bajkowski, a real estate agent, at the time of his death. "Grover Hutchins will be sorely missed, not only for what he did for science, but for the many friendships he developed and nurtured over the course of his 50 years at Hopkins," said Dr. Edward D. Miller, dean of the faculty of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 13, 2011
Dr. David Cornelius Donovan II, former director of pathology at Bon Secours Hospital who had also had been an assistant professor of pathology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died April 3 of heart failure at his Chestertown home. The former longtime Timonium resident was 82. The son of a road builder and a homemaker, Dr. Donovan was born in Staten Island, N.Y., and raised in New York City, where he graduated in 1946 from Regis High School. He was a 1950 graduate of Fordham University and earned his medical degree in 1954 from the State University of New York College of Medicine in New York City.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Dr. James Roncie Duke, a retired ophthalmologist and Johns Hopkins pathologist who was a collector of F. Scott Fitzgerald's works and lived in what once was the novelist's Baltimore home, died of complications from dementia Oct. 16 in Bolton Hill. He was 88. Born in Tampa, Fla., he was the son of an ophthalmologist. He attended Plant High School in Tampa and was a 1942 graduate of Staunton Military Academy in Virginia. In an autobiographical essay he wrote for a 50th class reunion at Princeton University, he said, "I wanted a change of scene from the South" when he applied to college.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 13, 2011
Dr. John Howard "Jack" Yardley, former director of pathology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, who had also been associate dean for academic affairs, died Dec. 7 of a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Roland Park resident was 85. "For more than 50 years, John devoted his energies to research, patient care and teaching," Dr. Edward D. Miller, dean of the medical faculty and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine, wrote in an email to his medical school colleagues.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2011
James Dowling "Jay" Cherry Jr., a former associate professor and chairman of the department of speech at the old Mount St. Agnes College who also gave one-man performances of historic Unitarians, died Aug. 24 of congestive heart failure at Timothy House in Towson. He was 89. The son of a traveling salesman and a homemaker, Mr. Cherry was born in Cleveland and raised in Bay Village, Ohio, where he graduated in 1940 from Parkview High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in speech and drama in 1944 from Ohio Wesleyan University and a master's degree in speech pathology in 1945 from what is now Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 13, 2011
Dr. David Cornelius Donovan II, former director of pathology at Bon Secours Hospital who had also had been an assistant professor of pathology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died April 3 of heart failure at his Chestertown home. The former longtime Timonium resident was 82. The son of a road builder and a homemaker, Dr. Donovan was born in Staten Island, N.Y., and raised in New York City, where he graduated in 1946 from Regis High School. He was a 1950 graduate of Fordham University and earned his medical degree in 1954 from the State University of New York College of Medicine in New York City.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 14, 2010
Dr. George T. Nager, former chairman of the Department of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who was also one of the world's leading otological surgeons and otopathologists, died Thursday from complications of a stroke at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The longtime Guilford resident was 93. "He was a real giant in his field and was very much a European in the way he approached and did things," Dr. Richard S. Ross, former dean of the Johns Hopkins medical school, said Tuesday.
NEWS
November 24, 2008
* Dr. Leonard N. Howard has joined the Department of Pathology at Mercy Medical Center. Board certified by the American Board of Pathology, Anatomic & Clinical Pathology, Howard has extensive professional experience at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in the Departments of Gynecologic and Breast Pathology, Orthopedic Pathology, and Hepatic and Gastrointestinal Pathology. He also served as chief of Anatomic Pathology and chief of the Department of Pathology at Dewitt Army Community Hospital in Fort Belvoir, Va. Howard earned his medical degree from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine.
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