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By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 10, 2011
Dr. George William Moore, who had practiced pathology in Baltimore since 1976 and was a pioneer in the field of medical informatics, died April 4 after a long illness. He was 65. During his career, Dr. Moore published hundreds of articles on pathology and computational medicine. His work in the closely related fields of medical informatics and pathology informatics, both of which emerged in the 1970s, was groundbreaking. Medical informatics covers the broad field of hospital computerization, while pathology informatics deals with the organization, retrieval and analysis of clinical laboratory data collected in medical centers.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2014
Dr. Oscar A. Iseri, a retired Veterans Administration pathologist, died April 25 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Lorien Harmony Hall Assisted Living in Columbia. He was 86. The son of Matahichi Iseri and Kisa Iseri, immigrant Japanese farmers, Oscar Akio Iseri was born in Thomas, Wash. During World War II, Dr. Iseri and other members of his family were sent in 1942 to the Pinedale Assembly Center, which was an internment camp for Japanese-Americans, near Fresno, Calif., and later to the Tule Lake Relocation Center in Modoc County, Calif.
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NEWS
September 25, 1991
Dr. Oscar Benwood Hunter Jr., 75, president of the College of American Pathologists from 1967 to 1969, died Saturday at his home on Gibson Island of cancer.A memorial mass was being offered at today at the Roman Catholic Church of the Little Flower in Bethesda.Dr. Hunter, who also had a home in Bethesda, was a pathologist and author of technical papers on hematology, neoplastic diseases and radioactive isotopes. He had been elected president of the Southern Medical Association and the Washington Society of Pathologists and was a member of the House of Delegates of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2013
Dr. Lorenz E. Zimmerman, the founder of modern ophthalmic pathology, who spent his nearly 60-year career studying diseases of the eye, died March 16 of complications from an infection at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. He was 92. His wife of 53 years, Anastasia U. Zimmerman, a registered nurse who had served as a major with the Army Nurse Corps, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure, also at Blakehurst. She was 89. "Without a doubt, Dr. Zimmerman was the most influential eye pathologist in the last 150 years.
NEWS
December 6, 2002
Dr. James E. Taylor, 74, hospital pathologist Dr. James E. Taylor, a retired hospital pathologist, died of heart failure Monday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Lutherville resident was 74. Born and raised on Railroad Avenue in Lutherville, he graduated from Polytechnic Institute in 1946. He served in the Navy as an aviation electronics instructor from 1946 to 1951. He attended the University of Maryland on the GI Bill, earning his bachelor's degree in 1955. He earned his medical degree from the University of Maryland School of Medicine in 1958.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | September 18, 2006
Dr. Edward Matthew Rehak, a retired pathologist who was an advocate for the disabled, died of a stroke Sept. 11 at a hospital in Gainesville, Ga. The former North Baltimore resident was 82. Born in Baltimore and raised on Ellwood Avenue, he was a 1943 graduate of Loyola High School and earned a bachelor's degree from Loyola College in 1946. He received his medical education at Georgetown University. After internship and a residency at the Veterans Administration Hospital at Mount Alto in the District of Columbia, Dr. Rehak became a pathologist at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2000
Dr. David Brandes, a Baltimore pathologist whose work in electron microscopy studying cancer cells led to a greater understanding of their structure and the effects of treatment on cellular growth, died Jan. 8 from complications during heart surgery at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 81. A longtime resident of Tudor Arms Apartments in Wyman Park, Dr. Brandes was associate chief pathologist at the old Baltimore City Hospitals, now Johns Hopkins Bayview, from 1965 until retiring in 1987.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1994
A pathologist told an Anne Arundel Circuit judge yesterday there is no way to know what killed a 61-year-old homeless man whose body was found in a shallow grave last spring.Dr. John E. Adams, the pathologist, said the July 21, 1993, autopsy report that labeled the death of Arch Baldwin a homicide was erroneous.Dr. Adams, a former assistant medical examiner who has conducted 5,000 autopsies, told Judge Robert H. Heller Jr. that Mr. Baldwin suffered from heart disease, had liver and pancreas problems, and had been treated at Anne Arundel Medical Center 21 times in the seven months before his death.
NEWS
April 25, 2007
Dr. Bert Frederick Morton, a retired pathologist who was active in Masonic affairs, died Saturday of complications from diabetes at Northwest Hospital Center. The Ellicott City resident was 67. Dr. Morton was born in Sandusky, Ohio, and raised in Akron, Ohio. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1963 from Case Western Reserve University and was a 1968 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine - completing his residency in pathology at St. Agnes Hospital. He was commissioned in the Navy in 1974 and served until 1976 at Bethesda Naval Medical Center.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 27, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The country's most prominent independent pathologist, a strong supporter of President Frederik W. de Klerk, charged yesterday that the South African police are "totally out of control" and are killing at least one black suspect a week."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Dr. James Roncie Duke, a retired ophthalmologist and Johns Hopkins pathologist who was a collector of F. Scott Fitzgerald's works and lived in what once was the novelist's Baltimore home, died of complications from dementia Oct. 16 in Bolton Hill. He was 88. Born in Tampa, Fla., he was the son of an ophthalmologist. He attended Plant High School in Tampa and was a 1942 graduate of Staunton Military Academy in Virginia. In an autobiographical essay he wrote for a 50th class reunion at Princeton University, he said, "I wanted a change of scene from the South" when he applied to college.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
Dr. John E. Adams, a pathologist who chaired the department of pathology at Greater Baltimore Medical Center for more than two decades after its founding and was a leading expert in bioethics, died July 9 of heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. The longtime Timonium resident was 82. "He influenced a lot of people, myself included. He was a seminal figure in my life and a role model for so many people," said Dr. Ronald L. Sirota, who worked with Dr. Adams at GBMC from 1979 to 1983.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 13, 2011
Dr. John Howard "Jack" Yardley, former director of pathology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, who had also been associate dean for academic affairs, died Dec. 7 of a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Roland Park resident was 85. "For more than 50 years, John devoted his energies to research, patient care and teaching," Dr. Edward D. Miller, dean of the medical faculty and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine, wrote in an email to his medical school colleagues.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 13, 2011
Dr. David Cornelius Donovan II, former director of pathology at Bon Secours Hospital who had also had been an assistant professor of pathology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died April 3 of heart failure at his Chestertown home. The former longtime Timonium resident was 82. The son of a road builder and a homemaker, Dr. Donovan was born in Staten Island, N.Y., and raised in New York City, where he graduated in 1946 from Regis High School. He was a 1950 graduate of Fordham University and earned his medical degree in 1954 from the State University of New York College of Medicine in New York City.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 10, 2011
Dr. George William Moore, who had practiced pathology in Baltimore since 1976 and was a pioneer in the field of medical informatics, died April 4 after a long illness. He was 65. During his career, Dr. Moore published hundreds of articles on pathology and computational medicine. His work in the closely related fields of medical informatics and pathology informatics, both of which emerged in the 1970s, was groundbreaking. Medical informatics covers the broad field of hospital computerization, while pathology informatics deals with the organization, retrieval and analysis of clinical laboratory data collected in medical centers.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 27, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Claims by the country's most prominent independent pathologist that police are guilty of a pattern of torturing and killing prisoners have added fuel to African National Congress accusations that security forces are fomenting violence to support white rule.The pathologist, Dr. Jonathan Gluckman, opened his files on more than 200 cases of prisoners who died in police custody and said they showed a police force "totally out of control.""Ninety percent of the people in these files, I am convinced, were killed by the police," he said.
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