Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPathogens
IN THE NEWS

Pathogens

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 2003
NEW YORK - Officials at the Plum Island Animal Disease Center have failed to safeguard pathogens that could be adapted to become weapons of germ warfare, including an agent potentially as "threatening as smallpox," a federal report says. Safety concerns at the island, off the North Fork of Long Island, have long focused on the pathogens of diseases generally confined to animals, such as foot-and-mouth disease and swine fever. But the report, excerpts of which were provided by a government official concerned about safety at the island, sounded a rare alarm about the potential of hazards to people.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
A stowaway slug that caught a free ride on a shipment of Mexican mint bound for Elkridge was intercepted at Washington Dulles International Airport as the first of its kind to be identified in the Washington region. Considered a threat to crops and human health, it was captured - and the mint destroyed. An entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed the Philomycidae slug was a "new pest" for the region, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials said Friday.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2010
If an envelope arrives in your office stuffed with a mysterious white powder, your chances for survival could be slipping away with each tick of the clock. If that powder proves to be anthrax, for example, and you don't get an effective antibiotic within the first 24 hours , "the chances of survival are slim," said Plamen Demirev, a senior scientist at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab. But it can take that long just to grow and identify any pathogens in the envelope, he said.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
State health officials are weighing new safeguards for research laboratories and biotechnology companies that handle potentially deadly infectious pathogens, but whether they will impose any remains uncertain because they don't know how big a threat there is. A state panel's report exploring what are known as biocontainment labs found that there is no single federal or state government body that inspects or tracks the facilities to ensure they...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Michael Stroh and Frank D. Roylance and Michael Stroh,SUN REPORTERS | December 8, 2006
This has been a tough week for the food industry. Taco Bell pulled suspect green onions from its 5,800 stores after dozens of people in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania were sickened by E. coli. In California, Jamba Juice warned consumers that its strawberry smoothies might be tainted with the deadly bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. And Consumer Reports found that 83 percent of the chicken its testers purchased in U.S. grocery stores carried organisms that cause food-borne illness.
NEWS
By Jeff Zeleny and Jeff Zeleny,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 4, 2005
BAKU, Azerbaijan - More than 60 dangerous and deadly bacterial strains that are a legacy of the former Soviet Union's elaborate biological weapons program were transferred last week to the United States from Azerbaijan as part of the two countries' joint fight against the threat of biological terrorism. Copies of the strains, including bacteria that cause plague and anthrax, left Baku aboard a U.S. military aircraft in a mission cloaked in secrecy. The pathogens were scheduled to arrive at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware by yesterday, officials said, and government scientists will begin their analysis this week in Washington.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | May 26, 2006
A Johns Hopkins study released yesterday has concluded that Asian oysters being considered for introduction into the Chesapeake Bay could pose a health threat because the shellfish are more likely to harbor pathogens that cause intestinal illness. "These oysters may present a public health threat upon entering the human food chain, if harvested from polluted water," Thaddeus Graczyk, an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, wrote in an article published in a scientific journal.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | August 5, 2008
A new technology that can quickly distinguish between subtly different strains of anthrax might have been central to the FBI's investigation of the deadly anthrax letters that killed five people and sickened many more in the autumn of 2001. The FBI has not disclosed how it drew a connection between the anthrax attacks and Bruce Ivins, a researcher at the Army's infectious disease lab at Fort Detrick in Frederick. Ivins killed himself last week as prosecutors prepared to indict him in the anthrax killings.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
State health officials are weighing new safeguards for research laboratories and biotechnology companies that handle potentially deadly infectious pathogens, but whether they will impose any remains uncertain because they don't know how big a threat there is. A state panel's report exploring what are known as biocontainment labs found that there is no single federal or state government body that inspects or tracks the facilities to ensure they...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diana K. Sugg and By Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff | March 10, 2002
Secret Agents: The Menace of Emerging Infections, by Madeline Drexler. Joseph Henry Press. 300 pages. $24.95. Americans give little thought to the teeming world of microorganisms in our midst: the billions of bacteria and viruses in our bodies, our food and our world. We buy groceries without considering foodborne infections. We push doctors for antibiotics without worrying that we may be contributing to antibiotic resistance. We travel widely without realizing we may carry home lethal viruses.
HEALTH
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2011
Nearly 100 people have reported symptoms of viral gastroenteritis after a weekend swim meet at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, state health officials said. Several athletes got sick on the pool deck during the finals session of the Maryland State Swimming Championships on Saturday, according to a letter on the Maryland Swimming website. Of the 99 people who reported illnesses to Maryland Swimming after the weekend's events, 89 were swimmers, about seven or eight others were officials or coaches on the pool deck and others were parents or spectators, said Raymond Brown, the organization' s general chair.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2011
The Rosedale Volunteer Fire Co. will receive $50,232 in federal funding to purchase emergency medical equipment, federal officials announced Tuesday. The grant, through Homeland Security's Assistance to Firefighters program, will allow the eastern Baltimore County company to purchase 15 sets of protective clothing that will safeguard its emergency services personnel from blood-borne pathogens. Remaining funds will pay for the latest in defibrillator equipment and a Stair Chair, which assists in moving patients up and down steps.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
If an envelope arrives in your office stuffed with a mysterious white powder, your chances for survival could be slipping away with each tick of the clock. If that powder proves to be anthrax, for example, and you don't get an effective antibiotic within the first 24 hours , "the chances of survival are slim," said Plamen Demirev, a senior scientist at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab. But it can take that long just to grow and identify any pathogens in the envelope, he said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | August 5, 2008
A new technology that can quickly distinguish between subtly different strains of anthrax might have been central to the FBI's investigation of the deadly anthrax letters that killed five people and sickened many more in the autumn of 2001. The FBI has not disclosed how it drew a connection between the anthrax attacks and Bruce Ivins, a researcher at the Army's infectious disease lab at Fort Detrick in Frederick. Ivins killed himself last week as prosecutors prepared to indict him in the anthrax killings.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | October 18, 2007
When the fall air turns brisk, you know that flu season is just around the corner. And when flu is rampant, doctors typically also see an increase in the number of patients with pneumonia, says Dr. Louis Domenici, chief of the division of general internal medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Neither illness is anything to sneeze at. Together they are listed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as the sixth leading cause of death among adults in the United States (behind heart disease, cancer, stroke, accidental death and lung disease)
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Michael Stroh and Frank D. Roylance and Michael Stroh,SUN REPORTERS | December 8, 2006
This has been a tough week for the food industry. Taco Bell pulled suspect green onions from its 5,800 stores after dozens of people in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania were sickened by E. coli. In California, Jamba Juice warned consumers that its strawberry smoothies might be tainted with the deadly bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. And Consumer Reports found that 83 percent of the chicken its testers purchased in U.S. grocery stores carried organisms that cause food-borne illness.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2002
Even as the FBI investigates a possible link between U.S. biodefense programs and last fall's anthrax attacks, a flood of new funding for bioterrorism research promises to increase rapidly the number of labs and people with access to such lethal pathogens. Some scientists say that without new limits and tougher regulations, the law of unintended consequences could come into play. The biodefense research boom could lead to diversions of organisms or expertise for new terrorist attacks, making Americans less safe rather than safer.
NEWS
September 6, 2006
Date of birth: May 15, 1947 Party affiliation: Republican Professional background: former Army officer (Chemical Corps); 30 years' experience as a business executive, owner, consultant in the medical, bio-defense/homeland security, biotechnology industry; member Homeland Security AOAC Task Force on rapid bio-detection; worked extensively with various countries in the area of emerging pathogens (i.e. avian flu) and bio-defense. Educational background: bachelor's degree, University of Wyoming; Master of Science degree, St. John's University.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.