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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2012
Despite last night's 3-1 loss to the Nationals, the Orioles can still clinch their fifth series win in six interleague series with a win in this afternoon's series finale. A win would also give the Orioles their 11th in interleague play, tying a franchise high previously done three times (1999, 2008, 2009). The Orioles will be without left-handed reliever Dana Eveland, who departed for California to be with his wife, Ashley, who gave birth to the couple's second child last night.
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August 4, 2014
In his commentary, "Ray Rice is not a victim" (July 31), Jacob Simpson sets us women back to pre-women's suffrage era. I understand he is a pastor and advocate against domestic violence, that's great, and I'm sure everyone he assists is grateful for that; we need more people like him in this world. What we don't need, however, is to hear from men who claim to "care" about Ray Rice's wife because she was "a victim" of alleged domestic violence. The same men who say "you should never put your hands on a woman" are probably saying that because they feel "women" are too fragile, weak or incapable of expelling the same violent tendencies and/or actions that Mr. Rice is being accused of doing to his then-fiancee.
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts has been placed on the three-day paternity list and the club has activated pitcher Steve Johnson from the 15-day disabled list. Roberts was in the hospital Friday with his wife, who was about to give birth to the couple's first child, a son. Johnson had been on the disabled list since June 6 with a left oblique strain. The St. Paul's alum will be in the bullpen Friday. Johnson was 1-1 with a 8.49 ERA in five games this year for the Orioles.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
In his two years with the Orioles, infielder Mark Reynolds was a clubhouse favorite for his self-deprecating humor and his key role in the 2012 playoff run with his powerful bat and solid defense at first base. Now with the Brewers, Reynolds said Monday that he was looking forward to seeing his old teammates - although he said he invited shortstop J.J. Hardy to dinner Monday and was rejected. “It's always good to see them and see all the coaches. I have a lot of friends, a lot of close friends [there]
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
As the sky-blue Winnebago makes its way though midday traffic in downtown Baltimore, pedestrians can't help but stare. Onlookers giggle and pull out their camera phones. The RV, painted with the phrase "Who's Your Daddy?" offers a service most wouldn't think of using during their lunch break: DNA testing. Demand for such tests has grown in recent decades, as a legal tool in cases of child custody and paternity cases but also as an increasingly accepted way to confirm biological ties at a time when single motherhood has skyrocketed.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Sun Staff Writer | October 12, 1994
Two Maryland men remain fathers in the eyes of the law -- though evidence later proved they were not -- because the men waited too long to challenge rulings in their paternity cases, the state's highest court has held.At issue in the cases, the Court of Appeals said, were competing interests: the court system's need to provide a final settlement -- and thus end the legal disputes vs. "the ascertainment of truth." Here, the court opted to protect its procedures.But, two dissenting judges said the high court's ruling "defies common sense."
NEWS
By MIKE MCCORMICK AND GLENN SACKS | August 20, 2006
The zeal to enforce child-support payments in the wake of the 1996 welfare reforms created an unexpected group of victims: men forced to pay 18 years of support for children who are not theirs - children who, in many cases, they've never even met. Writing in the American Bar Association's Family Law Quarterly, Washington attorney Ronald K. Henry details how this problem developed, and proposes some common-sense solutions. The problem is relatively new, and stems in large part from the federal Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act of 1996, which restructured the welfare system.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | April 25, 1993
UPPER MARLBORO -- Law clerk Wendy Karpel, bullhorn in hand, climbed on a ledge inside the Prince George's County courthouse.From this vantage point, the scene looked like a casting call for a baby-food commercial. Babies seemed to fill every nook and cranny of the cramped waiting area -- crying babies, screaming babies, babies in their Sunday best.Above the din, Ms. Karpel reeled off the cases now wanted before Judge David Gray Ross. Weighed down with diaper bags, car seats and strollers, adults collected the children and moved into the courtroom.
NEWS
By WILLIAM THOMPSON Sun staff writer Sherry Joe contributed to this article | October 23, 1994
Two Maryland men, lawyers and two judges who were overruled are still puzzling about the relationship of truth and justice as the result of a pair of paternity cases the Court of Appeals ruled on earlier this month.In both cases, justice at the hands of the state's highest court ignored obvious truth. As a result of the court's ruling, the two men are being forced to make support payments for children they never fathered.Here's what happened:Tyrone D. Wilson thought he was doing the right thing when his girlfriend delivered a baby girl in August 1990, and then, a week or so later agreed in writing to pay her child support each week.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2000
Route 140 travelers entering Carroll County are greeted by a picture of a scowling man in a scruffy beard. Clad in blue overalls and a tattered straw hat, he chews a blade of grass and clutches a shotgun in his beefy hands. Beside him stands a pony-tailed young woman in a hot-pink dress. Her hands surround a swollen belly. BRT Laboratories' billboard for DNA paternity testing then lists the company's name and toll-free phone number. The image of a farmer angry about his daughter's pregnancy has raised hackles in Finksburg and in the surrounding farming community.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
Orioles third baseman Manny Machado was not in the starting lineup for Friday's game against the Cleveland Indians at Camden Yards, but manager Buck Showalter said the team believes Machado can avoid going on the disabled list. Machado left Thursday's 8-7, 13-inning loss to Cleveland in the top of the 12th inning with right groin stiffness. “I think it was better than we thought it would be today,” Showalter said. “It's the proverbial day-to-day. We'll see what the next day or so brings, but we don't think it's a DL-able thing at this point.” Machado said his groin felt much better Friday, and he even hoped he could return to the starting lineup Saturday.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
SAN DIEGO - The day after Major League Baseball doled out hefty suspensions after its investigation into Biogenesis, the Orioles faced a San Diego Padres team that will be without one of its best players - shortstop and National League stolen base leader Everth Cabrera - for the rest of the regular season. No Orioles received punishment as part of the investigation - designated hitter Danny Valencia was cleared in the case - and Orioles shortstop J.J. Hardy said he believes players are glad that baseball has taken added measures to try to rid the game of performance-enhancing drugs.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Daniel Gallen and The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2013
After sending Steve Johnson to Triple-A on Saturday night so he could build up his innings in the Tides' rotation, the Orioles still had an open roster spot with Brian Roberts on the three-day paternity list. So they recalled infielder Danny Valencia from Norfolk and immediately inserted him into Sunday's lineup as the designated hitter. Valencia hadn't had a big league hit since June 16 and was in a 0-for-22 skid as an Oriole heading into Sunday. He grounded out in his first at-bat against the Seattle Mariners' Joe Saunders but snapped his hitless streak with a double in the fourth.
SPORTS
By Daniel Gallen and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Double-A Bowie had just finished batting practice when Orioles right-hander Steve Johnson, on a rehab assignment and scheduled to make a start Saturday night for the Baysox, got a phone call: He was needed in Baltimore to provide bullpen depth and take a roster spot after second baseman Brian Roberts went on paternity leave. Johnson was ready and available to pitch out of the bullpen, but he wasn't used in the Orioles' 11-8 win over Seattle . Johnson had been on the disabled list since June 5 with a strained left oblique and had made three rehab starts in the Gulf Coast League and with short-season Single-A Aberdeen over the past few weeks.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts has been placed on the three-day paternity list and the club has activated pitcher Steve Johnson from the 15-day disabled list. Roberts was in the hospital Friday with his wife, who was about to give birth to the couple's first child, a son. Johnson had been on the disabled list since June 6 with a left oblique strain. The St. Paul's alum will be in the bullpen Friday. Johnson was 1-1 with a 8.49 ERA in five games this year for the Orioles.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
As the sky-blue Winnebago makes its way though midday traffic in downtown Baltimore, pedestrians can't help but stare. Onlookers giggle and pull out their camera phones. The RV, painted with the phrase "Who's Your Daddy?" offers a service most wouldn't think of using during their lunch break: DNA testing. Demand for such tests has grown in recent decades, as a legal tool in cases of child custody and paternity cases but also as an increasingly accepted way to confirm biological ties at a time when single motherhood has skyrocketed.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2000
Ruling in three contested child-support cases, a sharply divided Court of Appeals decided this week that a father can challenge paternity years after legally acknowledging parenthood. The cases all involved the genetics, with the court's majority in the 4-3 decision saying biological proof is key to paternity proceedings. The minority expressed fear that the decision would leave an untold number of children without fathers or support. Child advocates fear that the ruling by Maryland's highest court will prompt throngs of men to demand paternity tests in hopes of ending child-support obligations.
NEWS
By Patti Doten and Patti Doten,Boston Globe | July 10, 1991
BOSTON -- For four years, Kevin Barboza paid court-ordered support stipends of $90 a week to a child that blood tests had proved was not his own.He also carried family health insurance for this child -- a child whose biological father was known by name to the court.Finally, after his case slowly made its way through the court system, Mr. Barboza, 32, was vindicated.He received word Friday that he had won his paternity case: a complex matter in which 20th-century scientific technology ran smack up against 18th-century legal and social traditions.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Orioles pitcher Miguel Gonzalez and his wife, Lucia, are proud parents of a baby girl, Leah, born at 9:20 p.m. Monday. It's the first child for the couple, and she weighed 6 pounds, 11 ounces and is 19 inches long. No word yet on whether Leah is right-handed like her father. Gonzalez was in Detroit on Monday, but he left the team to fly to Southern California for the birth. The due date wasn't until Wednesday. The Orioles can place Gonzalez on the major league paternity list and call up an additional player to replace him on the 25-man roster.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
DETROIT -- Orioles right-hander Miguel Gonzalez has left the team to join his wife, Lucia, in Southern California as she prepares to give birth to the couple's first child, according to a team official.   Their baby girl's due date isn't until Wednesday, but Gonzalez left the team just before Monday's game against the Tigers in Detroit. The Orioles can place Gonzalez on the major league paternity list on Tuesday and call up an additional player to replace him on the 25-man roster.
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