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NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
The Baltimore Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America has won approval from state officials to buy 19 acres in Harford County to expand the Broad Creek Memorial Scout Reservation through an unusual method known as a land patent. After conducting a public hearing this spring, the state's Commissioner of Land Patents Edward Papenfuse ruled that the land had never been deeded to a private owner and that the scouts had the right to purchase it. His decision marks the first time since 2002 that a private entity has received approval to secure a land patent from the state, after proving that no one else owns the land it wants.
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BUSINESS
April 6, 2012
Millennial Media was hit with a federal lawsuit in Delaware on Thursday by a competitor claiming that the Baltimore mobile advertising company infringed on three of its patents. The lawsuit came a week after Millennial went public, raising $152 million in what was widely considered a successful offering in the technology sector. New York City-based Augme Technologies Inc. is suing Millennial based on its holding of patents pertaining to the "providing of targeted content over the Internet.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
The 19 wooded acres in northern Harford County blend in well with the sprawling Boy Scouts campground that surrounds it. But on state tax rolls, the tract essentially doesn't exist. No owner is listed - a rarity in Maryland - and as the Boy Scouts try to add the land to their campground and be declared the official owner, they must grapple with an arcane, Colonial-era convention known as a land patent. Purchasing property by securing a land patent from the state was the way many people built wealth in the years after the Revolutionary War, but the practice mostly ended after the bulk of land in Maryland was first surveyed and sold off. The Baltimore Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America is using the same method to acquire a parcel that somehow slipped through the cracks.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2011
Louis August Scholz, a self-employed patent attorney and inventor who had worked in photography on the Manhattan Project during World War II, died April 20 of complications from a fall at his Sykesville home. He was 92 and died at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Born in Baltimore and raised in Rockdale near Randallstown, he was a 1935 Catonsville High School graduate and earned a degree in mathematics and physics at what is now Loyola University Maryland. As a young man, he exhibited an invention, a fluorometer, at the Central Enoch Pratt Free Library . Mr. Scholz worked at the Social Security Administration and the old Monitor Controller Co. on South Gay Street.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2010
Baltimore-based 180s Inc., whose flagship product are ear warmers that wrap around the head, is accusing a national retailer of stealing the patented design in a similar product it is selling in its stores. 180s filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against Brookstone Inc., a New Hampshire-based company. The Baltimore company is claiming that Brookstone's "Luxe" earmuffs infringe upon several of its patented designs. 180s is seeking monetary damages against Brookstone for allegedly violating the patents.
NEWS
By Steven L. Salzberg | November 9, 2010
A battle is under way over who owns our genes. Each of us has about 25,000 of them, stored in every cell in our body. Our genes are 99 percent identical from one individual to the next. The small differences in the remaining 1 percent of our DNA account for all the remarkable diversity in the human race. Thanks to advances in biotechnology, in the not-too-distant future we'll be able to carry our DNA sequences around with us, perhaps stored on a mini-flash drive or on our smartphones.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2010
Marie K. Razulis, a retired chemist, died of heart disease April 10 at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. She was 89 and lived in the Fairhaven Retirement Community. Born Marie Kuulei Goo-On in Washington, D.C., she was the daughter of parents who lived in Hawaii. Her ancestry was Chinese, Hawaiian and Portuguese. Her father took a job in Washington as a government translator and she spent her childhood in Falls Church, Va. As a child, she demonstrated artistic talent and played the piano.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2010
SAN FRANCISCO - As Apple Inc.'s iPhone faces stiffer competition in the lucrative market for smart phones, the company is going after one of its main rivals with patent lawsuits claiming theft of touch screen technology and other features. The complaints cover a slew of models made by Taiwanese phone maker HTC Corp., including the Nexus One, G1 and myTouch 3G - all using the free, rival Android mobile operating software from Google Inc. Non-Android phones include HTC's Touch series. Patent cases can take months or years to resolve.
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