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BUSINESS
December 30, 2009
Nokia Corp. is broadening a legal dispute it already has with Apple Inc. over the iPhone, saying almost all of the company's other products also violate the Finnish phone maker's patents. Nokia said Tuesday that it has filed a complaint against Apple with the U.S. International Trade Commission, alleging Apple's iPhone, iPods and computers all violate Nokia's intellectual property rights. At issue are key features found in Apple products, including aspects of user interface, cameras, antenna and power management technologies, Nokia said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 24, 2014
What's going on here? First it's the Internal Revenue Service harassing and intimidating minority political organizations. And now it's the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office trying to act as judge and jury regarding the ongoing debate over the use of the Washington Redskins team name ( "Washington's offensive line," June 20). This is apparently the brave new world of American democracy. Special interest groups now look to resolve any issue in their favor by raising a strident clamor and then look forward expectantly as a federal bureaucracy, obscure or not, resolves everything in their favor.
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NEWS
March 9, 2003
Researchers at the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center have obtained a patent with applications for biological-agent detection technology, the research center reports. The patent, which was awarded Dec. 31, involves a new spectroscopic method for the diagnosis of DNA damage. The procedure can be implemented with equipment used to detect the presence of biological weapons on battlefields. "This patent represents the hard work and dedication of our employees," said Jim Zarzycki, technical director of the Edgewood center.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Though the Washington Redskins have faced down past legal challenges to their controversial name, the NFL team's defiant battle took a new twist Wednesday against a backdrop of growing political opposition. Efforts to force a change of the Redskins nickname gained momentum when the U.S. Patent Office canceled the team's trademark on its name, terming it "disparaging of Native Americans. " The effect of the 2-1 ruling is symbolic for the time being, because the Redskins can retain their trademark while appealing the decision.
BUSINESS
By Dallas Morning News | April 7, 1991
DALLAS -- Texas Instruments Inc. claimed last week that on of its engineers was the first inventor of a computer that could be placed on a single microchip.The claim challenges a highly publicized patent awarded last July to an unknown California entrepreneur, Gilbert P. Hyatt.Although TI said it primarily wants to set the record straight, the winner of the legal battle could reap tens of millions of dollars in royalties from makers of products ranging from computer keyboards to videocassette recorders.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1996
Accelerated Payment Systems of Hunt Valley yesterday received a patent for a software system that allows businesses to collect payments from consumers over the phone without the use of credit cards.APS, a division of National Credit Management Corporation, calls its product "APS Checks." Here's how it works: A business lets customers make payments by providing a few key pieces of information, such as name, telephone number, a check number and the series of numbers on the bottom of the check.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | October 19, 2007
Government backlogs are far too familiar to Americans. Many disabled Americans must wait years to receive benefits from the Social Security Administration. Piles of unanalyzed DNA evidence are delaying justice nationwide. And hundreds of thousands of legal immigrants are stuck in line for citizenship because of a backlog of "name checks" at the FBI. But one backlog might top them all. About 730,000 inventors are waiting for patents - the right to a 20-year monopoly on the production and sale of their inventions.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 24, 2006
NEW YORK -- IBM Corp. sued Amazon.com Inc. yesterday, claiming that the Internet retailer's Web sites violate IBM's patents involving online commerce. International Business Machines said the patented technologies are fundamental to the way Amazon does business, including storing data, advertising and product recommendations. IBM is seeking royalties on billions of dollars in revenues. "IBM's property is being knowingly and unfairly exploited," said John E. Kelly III, senior vice president of IBM Technology and Intellectual Property.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1996
Information Resource Engineering Inc. said yesterday that it has received a patent on its new secure portable modem, a product the company said will promote telecommuting by making it easier for stay-at-home workers to affordably scramble transmissions to their offices."
NEWS
By Elizabeth H. Williams | June 3, 2007
By defiantly licensing generic versions of patented medicines, Thailand late last year and Brazil a few weeks ago have severely tested global health policy and the global trade system itself. A functional system would strike a judicious balance between the interests of drug companies, whose patents compensate them for the large investments required to develop lifesaving medicines, and the imperative to make them available to the world's poor. Instead, today we have a dysfunctional battle between pharmaceutical giants and governments of developing countries, each side claiming to champion the world's health needs and accusing the other of exploitation.
HEALTH
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
While blind people can browse the Internet through a variety of means, there is often one thing that stops them cold - a security feature known as a CAPTCHA that's designed to distinguish human users from robots. CAPTCHAs, in which a user must identify the letters in a distorted image, are commonly used to block automated bots from grabbing up all the tickets for an event, signing up for thousands of email addresses in a short period of time or unfairly swaying the results of an online poll.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Melvin Mowrey Jr., a retired Sweetheart Cup operations manager, died of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder March 6 at Dove House in Westminster. The Reisterstown resident was 76. Born in Baltimore and raised on Christian Street, he was the son of Melvin Mowrey Sr., who worked at the old Maryland Paper Products Co., and his wife, the former Dorothy Sher. He attended Baltimore public schools and took LaSalle Institute correspondence courses. Mr. Mowrey joined Maryland Paper Products, later Sweetheart Cup, on South Eutaw Street in February 1955.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | February 24, 2014
Most Ravens fans would probably tell you that they don't need to purchase the All-22 package on NFL's Game Rewind and dust off their old T-83 graphic calculator to determine that Joe Flacco was less accurate than usual in 2013. A simple eye test could tell you that. But a couple of statistics highlighted in this recent post by the guys at Pro Football Focus, who account for dropped passes when computing a quarterback's accuracy percentage, help put Flacco's season into context.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
The Abell Foundation, best known for its charitable work battling poverty in Baltimore, went to court this week over a very different venture: designing hybrid engines for vehicles. Over the past 15 years, the foundation quietly became a player in the future of automobile development. It invested more than $25 million in Paice, a Baltimore firm that invented a way to improve the performance of combined gas/electric engines but in recent years has spent considerable time in court.
NEWS
January 27, 2014
In his recent commentary on patent pools, David Balto takes issue with Blu-ray Disc patent pool One-Blue ( "Patent Pool abuse deserves scrutiny," Jan. 7). Mr. Balto suggests that One-Blue should have lowered its royalty rates as the retail prices of Blu-ray Disc players have come down. His assumptions are wrong. The idea that royalties should be calculated as a percentage of the price of products incorporating the patents is incorrect. In our modern economy, technology is an essential, autonomous input into our products, with its own value and price.
NEWS
January 10, 2014
David Balto's recent commentary on patent protection is another in a series of pieces making baseless attacks against MPEG LA ( "Patent pool abuse deserves scrutiny," Jan. 7). MPEG LA's record of service in response to the market's need for efficient access to patents owned by multiple patent owners is exemplary and transparent. Our MPEG-2 license is regarded as the premier and most successful of pool licenses. Mr. Balto's unsupported innuendo that it stifles competition and raise prices is out of line with the facts.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | December 22, 1993
Michael Manning envisions a ship that's part PT boat, part fighter plane, part Transformer toy that can adeptly maneuver in shallow waters while carrying a regiment of troops.The high-speed craft would come with a variable draft hull equipped with two pontoon-like pods to hold the craft at different depths on the high and low seas.The 40-year-old Wilde Lake village resident obtained a patent -- his first -- from the U.S. Patent Office for the concept last summer."There's no real research being done on this now," said Mr. Manning, a researcher at the Carderock Division of the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Montgomery County.
NEWS
By Peter J. Pitts | February 20, 2007
Imagine that you are an inventor and the government steals your highly lucrative idea. The next day, you are informed that the government plans to mass-produce your invention and give it away for free. If you're lucky, they'll give you a pittance for your efforts. This is what happens, with increasing regularity, to the manufacturers of lifesaving medicines. The most recent example occurred in Thailand when the military-appointed government issued "compulsory licenses" to obtain two drugs.
NEWS
By David Balto | January 7, 2014
As Congress considers legislation aimed at limiting lawsuits filed by so-called patent "trolls" - those who collect patents solely so they can sue others for infringing upon them - there is another kind of intellectual property abuse that members should look into: patent pools. Patent pools gather patents for a particular technology that is often made up of multiple components, each with its own patent held by a different company, so that manufacturers only have to go to one source for their licensing needs.
NEWS
By Scott Eldridge | July 4, 2013
The Food and Drug Administration's plans to streamline the approval process for "breakthrough" drugs that treat life-threatening diseases is great news for patients and has enormous potential for our pharmaceutical industry, already in the midst of an innovation explosion. Unfortunately, in the middle of all this progress, political leaders in Washington are pushing proposals that would severely undermine innovation and deliver a crippling blow to Maryland's biotech industry. Lawmakers must understand that without a favorable policy environment, innovation can grind to a halt.
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