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Patch Adams

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By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1998
Hunter D. "Patch" Adams, the doctor, was wearing his trademark red nose, striped outfit and big floppy shoes when a hospital-industry executive spotted him eating a steak-and-cheese sandwich in Denver airport's Terminal B three weeks ago.Sneaking up from behind, the executive teased the clown: The sandwich was not exactly the kind of fare a certain doctor in Arlington, Va., might recommend.But then, Patch Adams is not your ordinary doctor. "Wearing a rubber nose wherever I go has changed my life," he says.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 13, 2014
Among the heartfelt tributes, the death of Robin Williams has also drawn what is now a predictable response - people saying stupid and insensitive things about depression and suicide while babbling too long in front of the camera or posting intemperate outbursts on Twitter. Fox News host Shepard Smith ended a marathon broadcast by calling Williams a "coward," after inviting the audience to imagine raising three children as Williams did. "And yet, something inside you is so horrible or you're such a coward or whatever the reason that you decide that you have to end it. Robin Williams, at 63, did that today," he said.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 25, 1998
That noise you hear almost continuously during "Patch Adams" is the sound of buttons being pushed.A relentlessly manipulative feel-gooder, "Patch Adams" is not so much a movie as a chance for Robin Williams to perform stand-up comedy wearing a medical gown.Based on the real-life story of a man so disturbed by the medical profession's bedside manner that he started a hospital based on the idea that laughter really can be an effective healer, "Patch Adams" pushes so hard to make you smile that you'll end up laughing just to try to make it stop.
NEWS
By From staff reports | April 19, 2001
In Baltimore City Consultant hired to aid search for transportation chief The city is having such a tough time in its national search for a transportation director that it is hiring a consultant to help find one. The Board of Estimates approved a $48,000 contract yesterday with U.S. Alliance Group, an Arlington, Va.-based recruiting firm, that includes $16,000 when the company finds a finalist and another $16,000 when a job offer is made. The company specializes in recruiting and placement of former military personnel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ANN HORNADAY | June 6, 1999
School's not even out yet, and kids have already seen "The Phantom Menace" twice. Now they're squirming for something to do. Well, desperate parents, you're in luck. The landmark Bengies Drive-In Theatre, located at 3417 Eastern Blvd., has opened for one more summer. (The theater had closed last Halloween, when the owners put it up for sale.)Pack the kids into the car and check out a movie -- tonight's double feature is "The Mummy" and "Patch Adams" -- the way it ought to be checked out in the summertime: Outside, with a breeze blowing through the car windows and a 1950s-style snack bar nearby.
NEWS
By From staff reports | April 19, 2001
In Baltimore City Consultant hired to aid search for transportation chief The city is having such a tough time in its national search for a transportation director that it is hiring a consultant to help find one. The Board of Estimates approved a $48,000 contract yesterday with U.S. Alliance Group, an Arlington, Va.-based recruiting firm, that includes $16,000 when the company finds a finalist and another $16,000 when a job offer is made. The company specializes in recruiting and placement of former military personnel.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 13, 2014
Among the heartfelt tributes, the death of Robin Williams has also drawn what is now a predictable response - people saying stupid and insensitive things about depression and suicide while babbling too long in front of the camera or posting intemperate outbursts on Twitter. Fox News host Shepard Smith ended a marathon broadcast by calling Williams a "coward," after inviting the audience to imagine raising three children as Williams did. "And yet, something inside you is so horrible or you're such a coward or whatever the reason that you decide that you have to end it. Robin Williams, at 63, did that today," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | August 13, 2000
Daily, the traffic flows past that fortress at Baltimore's Forrest and Eager streets -- the public giving little thought to the thousand and more people who live in those buildings, to the many fewer people who make sure the inmates stay there. Soon the Maryland Penitentiary will be 200 years old, its distinctive square stone administrative building 100 years old. As its population grows, Maryland seems likely to go on needing places of confinement for an ever larger number of overcrowded, underemployed criminals.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 2002
PARK CITY, Utah - Fresh off a day of skiing, Robin Williams plunged into a free-association downhill before a recent interview. Then the questions began, and he cut as sharply to the answers as if he were in a slalom. Williams is in a busy creative period, having benched his sappy persona from such films as Patch Adams and What Dreams May Come. In addition to his standup comedy tour that comes tonight and tomorrow to Constitution Hall in Washington, he has three new movies coming out, which show a more sinister side.
NEWS
July 4, 2009
HERBERT G. KLEIN, 91 Nixon communication director Herbert G. Klein, President Richard M. Nixon's White House director of communications and a former editor for Copley Newspapers, died Thursday after suffering a cardiac arrest at his home in the San Diego suburb of La Jolla. Mr. Klein became a special correspondent for Copley after serving with the Navy in World War II. He covered Mr. Nixon's 1946 congressional campaign for Copley, starting an association that would eventually lead him to the White House.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | August 13, 2000
Daily, the traffic flows past that fortress at Baltimore's Forrest and Eager streets -- the public giving little thought to the thousand and more people who live in those buildings, to the many fewer people who make sure the inmates stay there. Soon the Maryland Penitentiary will be 200 years old, its distinctive square stone administrative building 100 years old. As its population grows, Maryland seems likely to go on needing places of confinement for an ever larger number of overcrowded, underemployed criminals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ANN HORNADAY | June 6, 1999
School's not even out yet, and kids have already seen "The Phantom Menace" twice. Now they're squirming for something to do. Well, desperate parents, you're in luck. The landmark Bengies Drive-In Theatre, located at 3417 Eastern Blvd., has opened for one more summer. (The theater had closed last Halloween, when the owners put it up for sale.)Pack the kids into the car and check out a movie -- tonight's double feature is "The Mummy" and "Patch Adams" -- the way it ought to be checked out in the summertime: Outside, with a breeze blowing through the car windows and a 1950s-style snack bar nearby.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1998
Hunter D. "Patch" Adams, the doctor, was wearing his trademark red nose, striped outfit and big floppy shoes when a hospital-industry executive spotted him eating a steak-and-cheese sandwich in Denver airport's Terminal B three weeks ago.Sneaking up from behind, the executive teased the clown: The sandwich was not exactly the kind of fare a certain doctor in Arlington, Va., might recommend.But then, Patch Adams is not your ordinary doctor. "Wearing a rubber nose wherever I go has changed my life," he says.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 25, 1998
That noise you hear almost continuously during "Patch Adams" is the sound of buttons being pushed.A relentlessly manipulative feel-gooder, "Patch Adams" is not so much a movie as a chance for Robin Williams to perform stand-up comedy wearing a medical gown.Based on the real-life story of a man so disturbed by the medical profession's bedside manner that he started a hospital based on the idea that laughter really can be an effective healer, "Patch Adams" pushes so hard to make you smile that you'll end up laughing just to try to make it stop.
NEWS
By RON DICKER and RON DICKER,HARTFORD COURANT | April 23, 2006
New York -- Play a clown-like healer in Patch Adams, and they rip you for being schmaltzy. Play a homicidal children's TV star in Death to Smoochy, and they rip you for being mean. Why can't Robin Williams win? "Sometimes you just catch a bad wave," he says. The ocean metaphor is an apt one for this interview, which finds the manic comedian in a laid-back California mood. Williams, 54, returns to broad big-studio yuks in RV, opening Friday. He liked the match with director Barry Sonnenfeld but insists the film is not image repair.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2005
The golden era of comedy albums -- the late 1950s and 1960s -- began with comics such as Shelly Berman and Lenny Bruce. The classic "2000-Year-Old Man" routine from Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks made its debut on vinyl in 1960, as did recordings from the comedy team of Elaine May and Mike Nichols. Bob Newhart had back-to-back No. 1 comedy albums in the early 1960s, but it was a presidential impersonator who set a sales record. The First Family (1962) featured the late Vaughn Meader's indelible impersonation of President Kennedy.
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