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NEWS
October 9, 2005
Friends of the Patapsco Female Institute will hold its fall cleanup at 8:45 a.m. Saturday at the institute, 3691 Sarah's Lane in Ellicott City. Volunteers should take work gloves, a shovel, a rake and garden tools if available. They should dress for the weather and wear sturdy shoes. The group will meet at Mount Ida, the visitor center. Information: 410-465-8500. Business group plans arts festival The Ellicott City Business Association will present its fourth annual Ellicott City Fall Arts Festival from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday on Main Street in Historic Ellicott City.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
At the start of Bram Stoker's 1897 novel "Dracula," a London lawyer named Harker visits Transylvania to facilitate a real estate deal for a mysterious count who desires new digs in England. Not anything freshly built, or even modestly rehabbed, mind you. Something old and crumbling will do fine, along the lines of the count's longtime castle, with its "dark window openings" and "frowning walls" that form "a jagged line against the sky. " Harker has found just the thing, he tells the count, an "ancient structure, built of heavy stones," a property that "has not been repaired for a large number of years" and has many trees that "make it in places gloomy.
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NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | November 14, 1994
One recent crisp day, Sally Bright and I spent a morning together on the grounds of Historic Ellicott City's Patapsco Female Institute. Sally, my neighbor from years back, now heads the Friends of the Patapsco Female Institute, which promotes the development of the institute as a historic landmark.Howard County government is stabilizing the ruins, which will allow the institute to be used once again. Amid the construction vehicles and hard hats, Sally shared with me her visions for the institute.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | June 28, 2012
Although Jane Austen lived nearly 200 years after William Shakespeare, they shared a literary sensitivity to the social rituals that make courtship such a trying experience. That's why it isn't much of a stretch for the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company to do a theatrical adaptation of Austen's novel "Pride and Prejudice" at the Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park in Ellicott City. "Pride and Prejudice" is a comedy of manners that resembles some of Shakespeare's comedies. A strong-minded young woman, Elizabeth Bennet, seems to enjoy fending off any romantic overtures made by the eligible bachelors swirling around her. Equally proud, Fitzwilliam Darcy seems to enjoy being rude to Elizabeth.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,Special to The Sun | March 18, 2007
Ann Harrison Ryder, information and referral coordinator for Howard County government, and Frances Mason, a retired society page writer, are two modern women with lives connected by a common thread. They both had ancestors who attended the Patapsco Female Institute, built on the highest hill in Ellicott City in 1837 as a school for well-to-do young women. "The female academy was in existence from 1837 to 1891, and, therefore, experienced not only the growth and expansion of the new democracy, but the rise of controversy and sectional disputes, culminating in the Civil War," wrote M. Lee Preston Jr., president of Friends of the Patapsco Female Institute Inc. When the school was founded, American women typically were busy sewing and cooking.
NEWS
By Sally Voris and Sally Voris,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 1998
FEW PLACES ARE spookier on Halloween than the ruins that sit atop Mount Misery in Ellicott City.A large, imposing granite structure, the Patapsco Female Institute ruins are open to the sky. On Halloween, mists rise from the depths of the structure, and the air is filled with an eerie light.In fact, when ghost hunters came to town last summer, they found evidence of ghosts at the site. Tales have been told about Annie, an apparition of a young girl dressed in white seen lingering in the ruins.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2003
After years of dubious treatment, portraits of two key figures in the history of the Patapsco Female Institute have a new home at the Howard County Historical Society. The paintings of Almira Hart Lincoln Phelps, who was principal of the finishing school, and her husband, John Phelps, reside in a corner of the historical society's museum building, protected from direct light, smoke and mistreatment that have affected the paintings. The Historical Society purchased the portraits in 1999 from the estate of Marjorie Phelps, a direct descendent of Almira Phelps, said Michael Walczak, the group's executive director.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
Nearly 40 years after it became a county park, the Patapsco Female Institute might be getting a face-lift. The Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks unveiled a plan last week for $1 million worth of improvements over three years at the historic park in Ellicott City, which includes the restored shell of a 19th- century girls' school. Supporters say a scarcity of parking spaces and portable toilets, and lack of areas protected from the weather, have hindered the site's ability to hold programs and attract visitors.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2001
Jacqueline Galke has heard the story before. A young student who died of pneumonia at Patapsco Female Institute before her parents could reach her wanders the grounds of the former 19th-century school. Nervous teens hang out there in hopes of a sighting. Ghost hunters stop by snapping random photographs. "We realize people think that it's a haunted site," said Galke, executive director of the Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park in Ellicott City. "Do we care? No. It's been considered a haunted site at least for the last 25 years."
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2004
The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company enjoys telling people its production of Much Ado About Nothing is in ruins. Those ruins belong to Patapsco Female Institute in Ellicott City, and company members say the remaining walls of the 19th-century school for girls are a great setting for a fresh, energetic and entertaining production of Much Ado About Nothing. "People forget Shakespeare wrote plays to make money," said actor Nathan Thomas, of Reading, Pa. "It wasn't intended to be like eating spinach."
NEWS
November 2, 2008
Friends of the Patapsco Female Institute Inc. will sponsor a Victorian tea and 19th-century fashion show at 3 p.m. Nov. 9 at the Mount Ida Visitor Center, Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park, 3691 Sarahs Lane, Ellicott City. Clothing from the 1800s will be featured in the fashion show. Tea will be served in the early Victorian parlors of the center, built about 1828. The halls and parlors display furnishings, art and garments appropriate to the institute, a once-famous school for girls that closed in 1891.
NEWS
March 16, 2008
The Kiwanis-Wallas Recreation Center is offering free drop-in bridge and pinochle and table games. A bridge group meets from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays; Pinochle meets from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays. Those who attend are invited to bring a bag lunch. Coffee, tea and treats will be provided. Donations are accepted for the snack fund. Duplicate bridge is available from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesdays and 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Fridays. Mahjong is played at the center from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesdays.
NEWS
March 9, 2008
The Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks will sponsor a camp during the county school system's spring break at Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park in Historic Ellicott City. "Victorian Dreams Living History Half-Day Camp" will be held March 17-20 from 9 a.m. to noon for students in grades four, five and six. The cost is $95 per camper. Participants will travel in time to the 1850s and will dress in camp-adapted pinafores as they make authentic crafts, play games and sports of the time period and learn Victorian dancing.
NEWS
By Jessica Dexheimer and Jessica Dexheimer,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2007
The mention of Shakespeare usually brings to mind drama, death, and lurid romance -- not fun family outings. This year, the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company is hoping to change that perception. In addition to alternating performances of the romantic comedy As You Like It and the historical drama Henry V, the company will offer activities designed to introduce children to The Bard. Performances of As You Like It begin the season this weekend at Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park in Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Graybill and Mary Ellen Graybill,Special to The Sun | March 18, 2007
Ann Harrison Ryder, information and referral coordinator for Howard County government, and Frances Mason, a retired society page writer, are two modern women with lives connected by a common thread. They both had ancestors who attended the Patapsco Female Institute, built on the highest hill in Ellicott City in 1837 as a school for well-to-do young women. "The female academy was in existence from 1837 to 1891, and, therefore, experienced not only the growth and expansion of the new democracy, but the rise of controversy and sectional disputes, culminating in the Civil War," wrote M. Lee Preston Jr., president of Friends of the Patapsco Female Institute Inc. When the school was founded, American women typically were busy sewing and cooking.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | February 16, 2007
A tiny footnote in a family-tree document inexorably linked Ann Harrison Ryder's volunteer work with Friends of the Patapsco Female Institute to her family, five generations back: "He educated his children, his daughters in Patapsco ... Patapsco Institute, near Baltimore, Maryland." Ryder was stunned to discover the uncanny connection while going through papers with her brother after the deaths of their parents. "Not too many schools at the time were academic - and the family wanted academic training for their young ladies, as well as their men," Ryder said.
NEWS
January 28, 2007
The Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park will offer "Victorian Dreams," a program in which girls in fourth, fifth and sixth grades can dress in pinafores, make a craft and play games from the 1850s. Participants will have a chance to experience a typical day for a young girl attending Patapsco Female Institute, the once renowned girls school in Ellicott Mills - now Ellicott City. The program will be offered from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. today and Saturday. The cost is $10. Reservations are required.
NEWS
January 7, 2007
The Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park will offer "Victorian Dreams," a program in which girls in fourth, fifth and sixth grades can dress in pinafores, make an authentic craft and play games and sports of the 1850s. Participants will have a chance to experience a typical day for a young girl attending the Patapsco Female Institute, the once renowned girls school in Ellicott Mills - now Ellicott City. The program will be offered at 2 p.m. Jan. 28 and Feb. 3. The cost is $10 a person.
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