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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
Actor Ed Norton might not make any retailer's favorite actor award this year after heartily endorsing Patagonia's anti-Cyber Monday stance. While most other companies were doing anything they could to lure buyers on Cyber Monday, one of the biggest online shopping days of the year, the outdoor gear provider Patagonia went the opposite direction. The company flat-out asked people not to buy anything from their store. Their pitch showed a picture of a Patagonia fleece with a bold-faced message, "DON'T BUY THIS JACKET.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
Actor Ed Norton might not make any retailer's favorite actor award this year after heartily endorsing Patagonia's anti-Cyber Monday stance. While most other companies were doing anything they could to lure buyers on Cyber Monday, one of the biggest online shopping days of the year, the outdoor gear provider Patagonia went the opposite direction. The company flat-out asked people not to buy anything from their store. Their pitch showed a picture of a Patagonia fleece with a bold-faced message, "DON'T BUY THIS JACKET.
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NEWS
By Brian Byrnes and Brian Byrnes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 2001
GAIMAN, Argentina - When Macsen Jones is scolded for acting like the mischievous 4-year-old that he is, the message can come at him in a variety of dialects. If his mother, Monica, is setting him straight, chances are he'll hear it in Castellano, the Argentine form of Spanish. If his father, Gwyn, is in charge, Macsen hears the hearty, whiplashed words of the Welsh language. Of course, his parents might also add some English as a way of weaning their son on yet another language. An unusual blend of vernacular, yes, but then again, as any one of Gaiman's 5,000 residents will tell you, this is a most unusual part of the world.
NEWS
By Brian Byrnes and Brian Byrnes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 2001
GAIMAN, Argentina - When Macsen Jones is scolded for acting like the mischievous 4-year-old that he is, the message can come at him in a variety of dialects. If his mother, Monica, is setting him straight, chances are he'll hear it in Castellano, the Argentine form of Spanish. If his father, Gwyn, is in charge, Macsen hears the hearty, whiplashed words of the Welsh language. Of course, his parents might also add some English as a way of weaning their son on yet another language. An unusual blend of vernacular, yes, but then again, as any one of Gaiman's 5,000 residents will tell you, this is a most unusual part of the world.
FEATURES
By Joe Doggett and Joe Doggett,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | November 9, 1997
Trevelin, Argentina -- Visionary Jules Verne had his time machine and surfer Bruce Brown his endless summer. Anglers traveling to Argentina can experience the best of both concepts.Patagonia represents a return to the Rocky Mountains of 50 years ago.The ice-clear streams are a time warp, a throwback to an era of dusty roads and uncluttered vistas, where the next pool around the bend always seems to sparkle with open water and rising trout. You can fish all day without seeing a fast-food wrapper.
FEATURES
By John Flinn and John Flinn,San Francisco Examiner | September 16, 1993
Talk about the ultimate in grunge fashion: Patagonia, the California-based maker of ultra-chic, ultra-pricey outdoor clothing, has just unveiled a sweater made of genuine garbage -- plastic soda bottles, to be exact.It looks and feels pretty much like virgin polyester, but each new "PCR Synchilla Sweater" is made from 25 recycled 2-liter plastic Coca Cola, 7-Up and Cragmont soda bottles.Patagonia claims the new fleece garments, which began arriving in stores last week, are every bit as functional and stylish as their regular counterparts.
FEATURES
By F. Lisa Beebe and F. Lisa Beebe,Contributing Writer | August 16, 1992
Was the brochure to be believed?In alluring prose, it stated: "Magellanes, Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego . . . names which for centuries have fascinated the world and conjured up images of untold adventure at the very ends of the earth."Shared by Chile and Argentina, Patagonia (which encompasses Tierra del Fuego) looms at the horizon of most travelers' knowledge and wonder. Precisely because we know so little about it, it is intriguing, like a flirtation ripe with daydreams and promise.Armed with expectations based more on fantasy than fact, I took off for Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, places out of history books and poetry, lands of an imagined aspect sketched from bits and pieces of information gleaned here and there.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1996
TWO-HEADED GIANT FOUND IN FELLS POINT!No way, you say. Preposterous. Unbelievable, improbable, implausible, inconceivable, infeasible, in fact, down right impossible, you say.OK, then -- what, or who, is that in the display case of the Antique Man in the 1700 block of Fleet Street?Robert Gerber, 53, shoulder-length hair gone to white, says it is Kap-Dwa (homo gigantis), slain warrior of ancient time. Odysseus and Aeneas might have come across the 12-foot giant, had their travels gone by way of Patagonia in the far reaches of South America.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 19, 1998
EL FOYEL, Argentina -- British-born billionaire Joe Lewis isn't building his new home in either of the two snow-capped mountain chains that run through his Patagonian ranch.He didn't choose the spot by the 270-foot waterfall, or the crystal river filled with trout that crashes through a deep gorge, or the deep, silent stand of virgin cypress forest.Instead, his mammoth new stone mansion, with its guest house and tile-roofed stable, sits at the foot of Lago Escondido -- Hidden Lake -- a mirror-smooth jewel that is the double of Lake Louise in Canada's stunning Banff National Park.
FEATURES
By Gary A. Warner and Gary A. Warner,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | January 25, 1998
Yesterday's must-see is next year's been there, done that. Last year's tourism pariah is this season's hot spot.In the supersonically shifting world of travel, nothing is more constant than change. The new year is no exception.Former travel destination all-stars Vietnam and Hong Kong have stumbled, while Los Angeles and Miami have rebounded on the strength of newfound chic.When it comes time to choose a 1998 vacation, no one wants to be a travel fashion victim. No worries (as they say in Australia)
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 19, 1998
EL FOYEL, Argentina -- British-born billionaire Joe Lewis isn't building his new home in either of the two snow-capped mountain chains that run through his Patagonian ranch.He didn't choose the spot by the 270-foot waterfall, or the crystal river filled with trout that crashes through a deep gorge, or the deep, silent stand of virgin cypress forest.Instead, his mammoth new stone mansion, with its guest house and tile-roofed stable, sits at the foot of Lago Escondido -- Hidden Lake -- a mirror-smooth jewel that is the double of Lake Louise in Canada's stunning Banff National Park.
FEATURES
By Gary A. Warner and Gary A. Warner,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | January 25, 1998
Yesterday's must-see is next year's been there, done that. Last year's tourism pariah is this season's hot spot.In the supersonically shifting world of travel, nothing is more constant than change. The new year is no exception.Former travel destination all-stars Vietnam and Hong Kong have stumbled, while Los Angeles and Miami have rebounded on the strength of newfound chic.When it comes time to choose a 1998 vacation, no one wants to be a travel fashion victim. No worries (as they say in Australia)
FEATURES
By Joe Doggett and Joe Doggett,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | November 9, 1997
Trevelin, Argentina -- Visionary Jules Verne had his time machine and surfer Bruce Brown his endless summer. Anglers traveling to Argentina can experience the best of both concepts.Patagonia represents a return to the Rocky Mountains of 50 years ago.The ice-clear streams are a time warp, a throwback to an era of dusty roads and uncluttered vistas, where the next pool around the bend always seems to sparkle with open water and rising trout. You can fish all day without seeing a fast-food wrapper.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1996
TWO-HEADED GIANT FOUND IN FELLS POINT!No way, you say. Preposterous. Unbelievable, improbable, implausible, inconceivable, infeasible, in fact, down right impossible, you say.OK, then -- what, or who, is that in the display case of the Antique Man in the 1700 block of Fleet Street?Robert Gerber, 53, shoulder-length hair gone to white, says it is Kap-Dwa (homo gigantis), slain warrior of ancient time. Odysseus and Aeneas might have come across the 12-foot giant, had their travels gone by way of Patagonia in the far reaches of South America.
FEATURES
By John Flinn and John Flinn,San Francisco Examiner | September 16, 1993
Talk about the ultimate in grunge fashion: Patagonia, the California-based maker of ultra-chic, ultra-pricey outdoor clothing, has just unveiled a sweater made of genuine garbage -- plastic soda bottles, to be exact.It looks and feels pretty much like virgin polyester, but each new "PCR Synchilla Sweater" is made from 25 recycled 2-liter plastic Coca Cola, 7-Up and Cragmont soda bottles.Patagonia claims the new fleece garments, which began arriving in stores last week, are every bit as functional and stylish as their regular counterparts.
FEATURES
By F. Lisa Beebe and F. Lisa Beebe,Contributing Writer | August 16, 1992
Was the brochure to be believed?In alluring prose, it stated: "Magellanes, Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego . . . names which for centuries have fascinated the world and conjured up images of untold adventure at the very ends of the earth."Shared by Chile and Argentina, Patagonia (which encompasses Tierra del Fuego) looms at the horizon of most travelers' knowledge and wonder. Precisely because we know so little about it, it is intriguing, like a flirtation ripe with daydreams and promise.Armed with expectations based more on fantasy than fact, I took off for Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, places out of history books and poetry, lands of an imagined aspect sketched from bits and pieces of information gleaned here and there.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | July 4, 2001
2000 Humberto Canale Semillon, Rio Negro ($7). South of Argentina's famous Mendoza region lies the little-known area of Rio Negro in Patagonia, which produces some startlingly fine wines. Canale, an excellent producer, has crafted a spectacular white-wine value in this sophisticated semillon. It offers vibrant flavors of pear, peach, lemon and spices, tempered with a gentle touch of oak. What sets this medium-bodied dry wine apart is its creamy, lanolinlike texture. It compares favorably to many wines at twice the price, and it would be an excellent match with salmon or poultry in a creamy sauce.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 21, 2006
Paleontology Dinosaur discovery leads meat-eaters in size The fossilized remains of what may have been the largest meat-eating dinosaur has been discovered in Argentina - a bus-sized monster that attacked its prey in roving packs, scientists announced Monday. The remains of at least seven of the beasts, named Mapusaurus roseae, were found clustered in 100-million-year-old rocks south of the city of Plaza Huincul in western Patagonia. Based on a shin bone that was about 3 feet long, researchers estimate that the largest adult in the group stretched about 41 feet and weighed about 15,000 pounds.
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