Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPat Tillman
IN THE NEWS

Pat Tillman

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 27, 2004
IN DEATH, Pat Tillman is getting the kind of attention he so admirably didn't seek in life. He's being hailed over and over as a remarkable hero. And while we more than agree, the singularity of his death is also a commentary on these times. Specialist Tillman, who forsook the good life of the National Football League for the hazards of soldiering as an Army Ranger, was killed Thursday during a firefight after his combat patrol was ambushed in southeastern Afghanistan. His body was to arrive yesterday at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware, accompanied by his younger brother, who serves in the same elite unit.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Sam Mellinger, Kansas City Star | July 8, 2011
The idea is always at the surface, has been since the story of an NFL star dying in an Afghanistan firefight captured America's attention, and struck especially hard on this past holiday weekend, 10 years after the Sept. 11 attacks. You remember Pat Tillman, the NFL star who sacrificed a dream career and millions of dollars for the front line of the fight against terrorism, driven by the kind of values the rest of us admire but can't always match. He died for it, killed by friendly fire and then disrespected by a government cover-up, so how could we not want to honor him as best we possibly can?
Advertisement
NEWS
By David S. Tanenhaus | May 5, 2004
PAT TILLMAN epitomized values that Americans hold dear, including sacrifice, selflessness, modesty, courage, loyalty and determination. Although he lacked size and speed, he became a star on the football field, first at Arizona State University and then with the Arizona Cardinals. After 9/11, he left the National Football League, forgoing fame and fortune to serve his country in the war on terror. On April 22, he died in Afghanistan, and recently was posthumously awarded the Silver Star for bravery on the battlefield.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 9, 2011
Like many Americans, I stayed up most of Sunday night watching the story of the longed-for end of Osama bin Laden unfold on television and on the Internet. I was spellbound by the drama of a midnight helicopter raid on bin Laden's hideaway; on the mythic SEAL commandos who moved through the house, room by room, until they cornered their prey and killed him; on their ticking-clock departure as the Pakistani air force scrambled to react to the unknown invaders. But through it all, one thought echoed: Don't let this be a lie. Don't let this story unravel like the tale of the heroism of injured soldier Jessica Lynch.
SPORTS
By Sam Farmer and Sam Farmer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 4, 2004
SAN JOSE, Calif. - With his hands trembling as much as his voice, Zack Walz reached into his left pants pocket and produced Pat Tillman's military dog tags, lifting them to the crowd of 3,000 that gathered yesterday at the Municipal Rose Garden to remember the man who sacrificed his NFL career - and ultimately his life - to serve his country as an Army Ranger. "Though I'm holding these dog tags in my hands today, I assure you this: This is the farthest they will ever be from their place around my neck," said Walz, who roomed with Tillman during their days with the Arizona Cardinals.
NEWS
By Sam Mellinger, Kansas City Star | July 8, 2011
The idea is always at the surface, has been since the story of an NFL star dying in an Afghanistan firefight captured America's attention, and struck especially hard on this past holiday weekend, 10 years after the Sept. 11 attacks. You remember Pat Tillman, the NFL star who sacrificed a dream career and millions of dollars for the front line of the fight against terrorism, driven by the kind of values the rest of us admire but can't always match. He died for it, killed by friendly fire and then disrespected by a government cover-up, so how could we not want to honor him as best we possibly can?
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | October 12, 2009
When my son graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in May 2006, my husband told friends and family that there would be plenty of tickets for the ceremony. Susan and her fellow mothers, he told everyone, will be busy handcuffing themselves to the White House fence in protest against the war. They won't need theirs. He was kidding, but I wasn't laughing. Peg Mullen, the patron saint of mothers of warriors, died earlier this month at the age of 92. An Iowa farm wife whose son, Michael, was killed by shrapnel from an errant U.S. artillery barrage in 1970, she emerged from the Silent Majority and inaugurated the age of distrust in government that was to follow.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2004
With a boost from U.S. Sen. John McCain of Arizona, Denver quarterback Jake Plummer won concessions from the NFL and the Broncos yesterday to end a three-week stalemate over his personal tribute to Pat Tillman, a former teammate who was killed in Afghanistan last spring. Plummer agreed not to wear a decal with Tillman's No. 40 on his helmet any longer after twice wearing it in defiance of the NFL's uniform policy. In return, the league will not fine him and will play public service announcements at all NFL games the weekend after Veterans Day. "It does come down to the fact that I still wish I could wear the sticker," Plummer said during a news conference in Denver.
NEWS
April 25, 2007
NATIONAL Search of food supply to begin The government will begin a sweeping search of the country's food supply for melamine, the industrial chemical linked to the pet food scare, federal health officials announced yesterday. pg 1a View of Pat Tillman's brother Kevin Tillman, brother of Cpl. Pat Tillman, the former NFL player killed in Afghanistan, accused the Pentagon and the Bush administration of concealing circumstances of his brother's death by friendly fire in an attempt to avoid embarrassment.
SPORTS
November 13, 2006
Pat Tillman, who left the Arizona Cardinals to join the Army Rangers and died in Afghanistan in 2004, was added to the team's "Ring of Honor" in a halftime ceremony yesterday. The crowd stood and cheered when his name was unfurled overlooking the 50-yard line in the Cardinals' new University of Phoenix Stadium. Before the game, the Cardinals dedicated an area outside the stadium known as "Pat Tillman Freedom Plaza." It includes a 500-pound, 8-foot tall bronze statue of Tillman. Behind the sculpture is a 42-foot-long wall, symbolic of Tillman's number at Arizona State.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | October 12, 2009
When my son graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in May 2006, my husband told friends and family that there would be plenty of tickets for the ceremony. Susan and her fellow mothers, he told everyone, will be busy handcuffing themselves to the White House fence in protest against the war. They won't need theirs. He was kidding, but I wasn't laughing. Peg Mullen, the patron saint of mothers of warriors, died earlier this month at the age of 92. An Iowa farm wife whose son, Michael, was killed by shrapnel from an errant U.S. artillery barrage in 1970, she emerged from the Silent Majority and inaugurated the age of distrust in government that was to follow.
NEWS
April 25, 2007
NATIONAL Search of food supply to begin The government will begin a sweeping search of the country's food supply for melamine, the industrial chemical linked to the pet food scare, federal health officials announced yesterday. pg 1a View of Pat Tillman's brother Kevin Tillman, brother of Cpl. Pat Tillman, the former NFL player killed in Afghanistan, accused the Pentagon and the Bush administration of concealing circumstances of his brother's death by friendly fire in an attempt to avoid embarrassment.
NEWS
By Adam Schreck and Johanna Neuman and Adam Schreck and Johanna Neuman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The brother of Army Ranger Pat Tillman accused the Pentagon and the Bush administration yesterday of deliberately concealing the circumstances of the former NFL star's friendly-fire death in Afghanistan in an attempt to avoid embarrassment. Speaking publicly for the first time since his brother was killed in Afghanistan three years ago, Kevin Tillman at a congressional hearing accused Army and administration officials of exploiting his brother's death to shift attention away from the detainee abuses at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison, which at the time was about to become a public relations nightmare for the military.
SPORTS
November 13, 2006
Pat Tillman, who left the Arizona Cardinals to join the Army Rangers and died in Afghanistan in 2004, was added to the team's "Ring of Honor" in a halftime ceremony yesterday. The crowd stood and cheered when his name was unfurled overlooking the 50-yard line in the Cardinals' new University of Phoenix Stadium. Before the game, the Cardinals dedicated an area outside the stadium known as "Pat Tillman Freedom Plaza." It includes a 500-pound, 8-foot tall bronze statue of Tillman. Behind the sculpture is a 42-foot-long wall, symbolic of Tillman's number at Arizona State.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | November 29, 2004
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED can certainly make a case for choosing the world champion Boston Red Sox as the magazine's 2004 Sportsmen of the Year, but the main headline on the SI Web site trumpeting the announcement yesterday left me scratching my strikingly handsome noggin. "Who Else?" That's quite an interesting question in a year in which cancer-survivor Lance Armstrong won yet another Tour de France, New England football hero Tom Brady won his second Super Bowl and Baltimore's own Michael Phelps delivered one of the greatest individual Olympic performances in history.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2004
With a boost from U.S. Sen. John McCain of Arizona, Denver quarterback Jake Plummer won concessions from the NFL and the Broncos yesterday to end a three-week stalemate over his personal tribute to Pat Tillman, a former teammate who was killed in Afghanistan last spring. Plummer agreed not to wear a decal with Tillman's No. 40 on his helmet any longer after twice wearing it in defiance of the NFL's uniform policy. In return, the league will not fine him and will play public service announcements at all NFL games the weekend after Veterans Day. "It does come down to the fact that I still wish I could wear the sticker," Plummer said during a news conference in Denver.
NEWS
By Adam Schreck and Johanna Neuman and Adam Schreck and Johanna Neuman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The brother of Army Ranger Pat Tillman accused the Pentagon and the Bush administration yesterday of deliberately concealing the circumstances of the former NFL star's friendly-fire death in Afghanistan in an attempt to avoid embarrassment. Speaking publicly for the first time since his brother was killed in Afghanistan three years ago, Kevin Tillman at a congressional hearing accused Army and administration officials of exploiting his brother's death to shift attention away from the detainee abuses at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison, which at the time was about to become a public relations nightmare for the military.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 9, 2011
Like many Americans, I stayed up most of Sunday night watching the story of the longed-for end of Osama bin Laden unfold on television and on the Internet. I was spellbound by the drama of a midnight helicopter raid on bin Laden's hideaway; on the mythic SEAL commandos who moved through the house, room by room, until they cornered their prey and killed him; on their ticking-clock departure as the Pakistani air force scrambled to react to the unknown invaders. But through it all, one thought echoed: Don't let this be a lie. Don't let this story unravel like the tale of the heroism of injured soldier Jessica Lynch.
NEWS
By David S. Tanenhaus | May 5, 2004
PAT TILLMAN epitomized values that Americans hold dear, including sacrifice, selflessness, modesty, courage, loyalty and determination. Although he lacked size and speed, he became a star on the football field, first at Arizona State University and then with the Arizona Cardinals. After 9/11, he left the National Football League, forgoing fame and fortune to serve his country in the war on terror. On April 22, he died in Afghanistan, and recently was posthumously awarded the Silver Star for bravery on the battlefield.
SPORTS
By Sam Farmer and Sam Farmer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 4, 2004
SAN JOSE, Calif. - With his hands trembling as much as his voice, Zack Walz reached into his left pants pocket and produced Pat Tillman's military dog tags, lifting them to the crowd of 3,000 that gathered yesterday at the Municipal Rose Garden to remember the man who sacrificed his NFL career - and ultimately his life - to serve his country as an Army Ranger. "Though I'm holding these dog tags in my hands today, I assure you this: This is the farthest they will ever be from their place around my neck," said Walz, who roomed with Tillman during their days with the Arizona Cardinals.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.