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By WILLIAM PFAFF | March 13, 1995
Paris. -- In 1991 the Rev. Pat Robertson, the evangelical television preacher, founder of the 1.5 million-member ''Christian Coalition,'' an influential figure on the American political right, published a book called ''The New World Order.'' It was a direct response to George Bush's proclamation of that supposed new order, in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf War.In this book Mr. Robertson described the threat to American sovereignty posed, he said, by a conspiracy of internationalist forces dominating not only the U.N. but liberal and internationalist political circles within both American political parties.
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NEWS
January 17, 2010
Pat Robertson's recent claim that the Haitian earthquake is punishment from God is not a fluke. It is, instead, part of a long string of mean-spirited, narrow-minded drivel from Mr. Robertson. I believe in a supreme being. I also believe that Mr. Robertson gives him a bad name. Denny Olver, Baltimore
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NEWS
By David R. Raupp | May 13, 1993
PAT Robertson intends to make the job of serving on a school board even harder. The Christian broadcaster has mounted a campaign in Maryland and around the country to use this year's high school graduation ceremonies as a springboard to bring prayer back to public schools.Charging that his opponents want "to keep God away from America's graduations," Mr. Robertson, through his legal foundation, the American Center for Law and Justice, has issued 300,000 copies of a bulletin that encourages students to initiate prayers, Christian testimonies and other religious speech during graduation ceremonies this month and next.
NEWS
January 15, 2010
I am a confused and angry American. Today I open my browser and see the devastation in Haiti. My heart breaks for those people and I have collected clothes from each closet to send, wishing I could do more. Next is Pat Robertson saying this was brought on by their ancestors because they sold themselves to the devil to drive out the French back in 1791. This is the same as the mean and untrue things he said about 9/11. It happened because the country was filled with feminists, abortionists, ACLU members, and gays and lesbians.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In public, televangelist Pat Robertson is a smiling preacher who insists his Christian Coalition is a nonpartisan group that seeks only to educate voters about religious issues, not to elect one party or specific politicians.But behind closed doors last week, Robertson revealed himself as a tough political boss who expects his troops to issue marching orders to a Republican Congress he says they elected and to handpick the country's next Republican president in 2000."We're not a bunch of ingenues any more," he told about 100 state leaders at a meeting in Atlanta.
NEWS
January 17, 2010
Pat Robertson's recent claim that the Haitian earthquake is punishment from God is not a fluke. It is, instead, part of a long string of mean-spirited, narrow-minded drivel from Mr. Robertson. I believe in a supreme being. I also believe that Mr. Robertson gives him a bad name. Denny Olver, Baltimore
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 10, 2000
McCain becomes the counterweight to Pat Robertson in the GOP, hopefully keeping Bush balanced upright. The vote to oust its first African-American sitting judge will come back to haunt Baltimore County. The China trade issue pits the presidential party against the congressional party and this election can't settle this. The tall ships will come up the bay as if there weren't enough sailboats out there already.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Robert Timberg contributed to this article | November 5, 1994
A new ad for Democrat Parris N. Glendening linking opponent Ellen R. Sauerbrey to evangelist Pat Robertson drew a blistering response yesterday from Mrs. Sauerbrey, who called it a "despicable" assault on conservative Christian voters.In some of the harshest rhetoric of the gubernatorial campaign, the Republican said the commercial -- which says she is backed by "Pat Robertson's radical right" -- amounts to religious "bigotry.""What's the message? That there's something wrong with someone with faith supporting a person in the political process?"
NEWS
By Peter Wallsten and Edwin Chen and Peter Wallsten and Edwin Chen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 21, 2004
EAU CLAIRE, Wis. - Democrats trying to portray President Bush as too headstrong when he decided to invade Iraq got help this week from an unlikely source: evangelist and Bush supporter Pat Robertson. Appearing on Paula Zahn Now on CNN Tuesday night, Robertson recalled a private meeting with Bush in Nashville, Tenn., before the Iraq war began. He said the president asserted that there would be no war casualties. "I warned him about this war. I had deep misgivings about this war, deep misgivings.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 1995
If a new television campaign by Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays had had only its dramatic scenes -- a teen-age girl contemplating suicide with a handgun and a young man being beaten by a gang as the attackers shout slurs -- it would have been controversial enough.But because these scenes are interspersed with clips of the Rev. Pat Robertson and other conservatives deploring homosexuality, the campaign has drawn the wrath of Mr. Robertson's Christian Broadcasting Network, which is threatening legal action against stations that broadcast the two 30-second advertisements.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Simon and Stephanie Simon,Los Angeles Times | April 16, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Political reporter David Brody is punching his keyboard with two fingers, checking the Web for mentions of his stories. Up pops a liberal blog quoting one of his recent interviews. He's delighted - until he sees the snippet is attributed to "Pat Robertson's CBN." "Pat Robertson's CBN," Brody says in frustration. "We take that as a dig." Brody does work for Robertson's Christian Broadcasting Network, and mostly he's proud of that. But stereotypes are inevitable when you cover politics for a network run by a standard-bearer of the religious right.
NEWS
By Jon Wiener and Jon Wiener,Los Angeles Times | January 14, 2007
American Fascists: The Christian Right and the War on America Chris Hedges Free Press / 256 pages / $25 President Eisenhower famously said, "Our government makes no sense unless it is founded in a deeply felt religious faith, and I don't care what that faith is." The people Chris Hedges writes about in his new book have a different view: They care a lot about the religion on which our government is based and they think it should be Christianity - their version, of course. American Fascists: The Christian Right and the War on America is a call to arms against what Hedges sees as the efforts of Jerry Falwell, Pat Robertson and the operators of Trinity Broadcasting Network, among others, to turn the United States into a Christian nation.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN AND JOANNA DAEMMRICH and MATTHEW HAY BROWN AND JOANNA DAEMMRICH,SUN REPORTERS | January 18, 2006
To hear some tell it, God has had his hands full these past few months. Just ask the Rev. Pat Robertson. Or Indianapolis Colts kicker Mike Vanderjagt. Or New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin. The embattled chief executive of the storm-ravaged city became the latest leader to see the divine hand in earthly disaster this week when he said it was the wrath of God that sent "hurricane after hurricane after hurricane" to the Gulf Coast. "Surely, God is mad at America," Nagin said Monday during festivities to honor the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. "Surely he doesn't approve of us being in Iraq under false pretenses.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | November 15, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Call me paranoid, but sometimes I think the mainstream media give maximum coverage to the Rev. Pat Robertson in order to discredit him. Or at least to discredit politically active TV evangelists who have enough connections to get their phone calls returned from the White House. Either way, it hasn't worked. Mr. Robertson is still in business. His latest fatwa, delivered on The 700 Club, his daily Virginia-based television show, is directed at "the good citizens of Dover," a Pennsylvania town that Mr. Robertson says has "rejected" God. Their sinful deed, Mr. Robertson says, was to vote out of office all of Dover's school board members who were up for re-election and supported intelligent design.
NEWS
By ROBERT LITTLE and ROBERT LITTLE,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
DOVER, PA. -- Jim Cashman wants a recount, but even if he still winds up losing his seat on the area school board, he wants to make something clear: God has not been voted out of office. In fact, God is very much in good favor in the shops and creaky porch-fronts of this small Pennsylvania town, despite the community's apparent objection to discussing "intelligent design" in the local public high school, Cashman said. The Supreme Being certainly hasn't been "rejected" from the place, as religious broadcaster Pat Robertson suggested the other day. "That was an unfortunate thing to say," said Cashman, a 51-year-old auto repair shop owner who was among eight school board members voted out of office this week, ostensibly for approving a four-paragraph passage, read during ninth-grade biology class at Dover Area High School, suggesting an alternative to Darwin's theory of evolution.
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | August 30, 2005
THE SIMILARITIES among the radical wings of religious fundamentalism are striking and frightening. In Iran, for example, the mullahs issue fatwas, the exhortations to assassinate people they don't like. The most notorious of these in recent times was the fatwa issued in 1989 by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini against the Indian-born author Salman Rushdie. The ayatollah was incensed because Mr. Rushdie's novel Satanic Verses seemed to insult Islam. We have our own religious nuts here in America.
NEWS
March 11, 1991
After a fire devastated Universal Studios last year, Pat Robertson, the preacher-politician guru of televangelism, used his Christian Broadcasting Network's "700 Club" as a bully pulpit: "God is going to judge the entertainment industry in Hollywood," he warned. "It's interesting that Universal -- they produced 'The Last Temptation of Christ,' which many of us thought was blasphemous in the extreme -- finds this kind of activity taking place."But Preacher Pat, who has built his career claiming that there is but one position a "good Christian" can take on just about every political issue, fell strangely silent when a fire destroyed his radio station in Silver Spring, WNTR -- not only causing $1 million in damage, but also silencing his talk show for nearly a week.
NEWS
August 26, 2005
Effort to open center for kids earns embrace I was both disturbed and disappointed to read how some residents of Baltimore have received a group of young people who are trying to do the right thing by opening a youth center ("Dreams of opening center - as well as people's hearts," Aug. 21). It is often said that children are our future. When did adults in Baltimore become so hostile toward that future? Some of the concerns expressed by area residents are legitimate. The Midway and Coldstream communities have some of the city's higher juvenile arrests rates, and from 2002 to 2003, the number of reported incidents of dirty streets and alleys in those communities tripled.
NEWS
August 26, 2005
Effort to open center for kids earns embrace I was both disturbed and disappointed to read how some residents of Baltimore have received a group of young people who are trying to do the right thing by opening a youth center ("Dreams of opening center - as well as people's hearts," Aug. 21). It is often said that children are our future. When did adults in Baltimore become so hostile toward that future? Some of the concerns expressed by area residents are legitimate. The Midway and Coldstream communities have some of the city's higher juvenile arrests rates, and from 2002 to 2003, the number of reported incidents of dirty streets and alleys in those communities tripled.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 25, 2005
The Rev. Pat Robertson seemed to delight years ago in waving before his television flock an American Civil Liberties Union letter showing his photograph alongside two other prominent Christian conservatives under the headline: "The Most Dangerous Men in America?" His significance as menace or inspiration is less clear now than it was then, due not least to Robertson's success making Christian conservatism a force in mainstream national politics. Many scholars who have written on Christian conservatism say the 75-year-old evangelist is well past his peak of influence.
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