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Pat Nixon

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NEWS
By William Safire | June 25, 1993
THE only time I saw Pat Nixon get testy with her husband was when he invited their Irish setter, King Timahoe, to climb up on a newly recovered couch in his White House office; it offended her frugal soul and she let Richard Nixon know it.What I did not know at the time was their experience with `D another dog. During the two years in the 1940s when Mr. Nixon was trying to get her to marry him, she took care of his Irish setter, also named King; the young...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Blake Green and Blake Green,NEWSDAY | November 7, 2004
So definite a type is actor Mario Cantone that some of the wacky roles he's played were written just for him, including Anthony, the swishy wedding planner in HBO's Sex and the City, and Gidger, the combustive editorial assistant in The Violet Hour on Broadway. A frequent guest on ABC's The View, Cantone is becoming a favorite to do the morning-after skewering of entertainment awards shows. The short, feisty, energetic comedian has just written something for himself. No surprise, it's a huge, over-the-top starring role - the only role, in fact, in Laugh Whore at Broadway's Cort Theatre.
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NEWS
June 23, 1993
For years after she left the White House, Thelma Catherine Ryan Nixon -- Pat -- refused to pose for a White House portrait. Daughter Julie Nixon Eisenhower argued, "Mother, don't give those who would be happy if Daddy's and your portraits never hung in the White House a victory by default." She replied -- "matter-of-factly" in Julie's words -- "Why not? They won, didn't they?"In a way that summed up her life as a politician's wife, who died yesterday at 81. She suffered the same wounds he did. In a way, she was more victimized than her husband, because she would have preferred not to be in that arena.
NEWS
By Bradford Jacobs | July 2, 1993
PAT Nixon stood dutifully there in the receiving line. The pale, delicate face seemed stiffened by the hundreds of receptions White House protocol had imposed on her. On her right, the president looked stiff, too, and no wonder: This reception was for newspaper editors, a breed which seldom treated him kindly. Above the pained presidential grin there gleamed a couple of drops of the trade-mark perspiration.By far the crispest-looking of the three -- a shimmering blaze of blue and red, shot through with gold stripes and buttons -- was the rigid young Marine whose duty was to announce the guests, one by nervous one."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Long-suffering is an expression that was made for Pat Nixon, the first lady who survived the victories and defeats of her husband Richard with an equanimity usually associated only with sainthood. The antithesis of the political wife, she was in public and by most reports in private the silent partner of a man who demonstrated an unquenchable need to be heard on all manner of public issues.Raised in an era when women generally and first ladies in particular were expected foremost to be "helpmates" to the ambitions of their husbands, looking pleasant and saying and doing little, Pat Nixon died at 81 at a time the "office" of first lady as occupied by Hillary Clinton has been thoroughly recast.
NEWS
By Bradford Jacobs | July 2, 1993
PAT Nixon stood dutifully there in the receiving line. The pale, delicate face seemed stiffened by the hundreds of receptions White House protocol had imposed on her. On her right, the president looked stiff, too, and no wonder: This reception was for newspaper editors, a breed which seldom treated him kindly. Above the pained presidential grin there gleamed a couple of drops of the trade-mark perspiration.By far the crispest-looking of the three -- a shimmering blaze of blue and red, shot through with gold stripes and buttons -- was the rigid young Marine whose duty was to announce the guests, one by nervous one."
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 28, 1993
Boston. -- We never knew her. Not really. Not the people who once voted her the Most Admired Woman in America. And not the people who once named her Plastic Pat.She came to the White House after Jackie and Lady Bird. She came before Betty, Rosalynn, Nancy, Barbara and Hillary. But there is no cause, no recovery center, no career named after Pat Nixon. No court would ever have ruled -- as one did of the current First Lady -- that she was a ''de facto government official.''The woman who died last week was, rather, described by the obituary writers as ''the quiet consort,'' ''the loyal wife,'' ''a private person.
NEWS
By Robin Abcarian | July 1, 1993
TWO stories about first ladies in the newspaper last week brought home how the role of the president's wife has changed in the last two decades -- and our deep ambivalence about the job.On the same day we read about the death of Pat Nixon -- the "perfect political wife" -- we learned the courts had ruled that Hillary Rodham Clinton is a "de facto" government employee, and as such is not required to invite the public to meetings of her health-care task force.In...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Blake Green and Blake Green,NEWSDAY | November 7, 2004
So definite a type is actor Mario Cantone that some of the wacky roles he's played were written just for him, including Anthony, the swishy wedding planner in HBO's Sex and the City, and Gidger, the combustive editorial assistant in The Violet Hour on Broadway. A frequent guest on ABC's The View, Cantone is becoming a favorite to do the morning-after skewering of entertainment awards shows. The short, feisty, energetic comedian has just written something for himself. No surprise, it's a huge, over-the-top starring role - the only role, in fact, in Laugh Whore at Broadway's Cort Theatre.
NEWS
February 17, 2006
Suddenly on Wednesday, February 15, 2006, PAT NIXON FRANCIS, age 54. He was a retired Correctional Officer from the Montgomery County Detention Center. He is survived by his mother, Edith Francis, one sister, Lana Becraft and her husband John, one daughter, Courtney Francis, his life long partner, Bonita Patrick, one niece, nephew and a host of other relatives and friends. A memorial service will be held at a later date.
NEWS
By Robin Abcarian | July 1, 1993
TWO stories about first ladies in the newspaper last week brought home how the role of the president's wife has changed in the last two decades -- and our deep ambivalence about the job.On the same day we read about the death of Pat Nixon -- the "perfect political wife" -- we learned the courts had ruled that Hillary Rodham Clinton is a "de facto" government employee, and as such is not required to invite the public to meetings of her health-care task force.In...
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 28, 1993
Boston. -- We never knew her. Not really. Not the people who once voted her the Most Admired Woman in America. And not the people who once named her Plastic Pat.She came to the White House after Jackie and Lady Bird. She came before Betty, Rosalynn, Nancy, Barbara and Hillary. But there is no cause, no recovery center, no career named after Pat Nixon. No court would ever have ruled -- as one did of the current First Lady -- that she was a ''de facto government official.''The woman who died last week was, rather, described by the obituary writers as ''the quiet consort,'' ''the loyal wife,'' ''a private person.
NEWS
By William Safire | June 25, 1993
THE only time I saw Pat Nixon get testy with her husband was when he invited their Irish setter, King Timahoe, to climb up on a newly recovered couch in his White House office; it offended her frugal soul and she let Richard Nixon know it.What I did not know at the time was their experience with `D another dog. During the two years in the 1940s when Mr. Nixon was trying to get her to marry him, she took care of his Irish setter, also named King; the young...
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Long-suffering is an expression that was made for Pat Nixon, the first lady who survived the victories and defeats of her husband Richard with an equanimity usually associated only with sainthood. The antithesis of the political wife, she was in public and by most reports in private the silent partner of a man who demonstrated an unquenchable need to be heard on all manner of public issues.Raised in an era when women generally and first ladies in particular were expected foremost to be "helpmates" to the ambitions of their husbands, looking pleasant and saying and doing little, Pat Nixon died at 81 at a time the "office" of first lady as occupied by Hillary Clinton has been thoroughly recast.
NEWS
June 23, 1993
For years after she left the White House, Thelma Catherine Ryan Nixon -- Pat -- refused to pose for a White House portrait. Daughter Julie Nixon Eisenhower argued, "Mother, don't give those who would be happy if Daddy's and your portraits never hung in the White House a victory by default." She replied -- "matter-of-factly" in Julie's words -- "Why not? They won, didn't they?"In a way that summed up her life as a politician's wife, who died yesterday at 81. She suffered the same wounds he did. In a way, she was more victimized than her husband, because she would have preferred not to be in that arena.
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