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Pat Moran

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By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 19, 1997
Casting director Pat Moran will receive the Women in Film & Video of Maryland's first Charm City Award for her contributions to promoting women in the film and television industries.The Baltimore native is the principal and location casting director for NBC's "Homicide: Life on the Streets." She also has been responsible for casting numerous feature films, including "Enemy the State," "Private Parts," "Absolute Power," "Washington Square," "Avalon" and "Serial Mom."Moran received Emmy nominations for Outstanding Achievement in Casting for a Series for the 1995-1996 and 1996-1997 television seasons.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2013
John J. Moran II, a Baltimore-born attorney who practiced in York, Pa., died of an apparent heart attack Monday at his home in Hallam, Pa. He was 66. The son of John J. Moran, an orchestra leader, and Grace Eleanor Schweitzer, who ran a neighborhood grocery store, he grew up in Beechfield. He attended St. Joseph's Monastery School and was a 1965 graduate of Mount St. Joseph's High School. He earned a bachelor's degree at the University of Baltimore, where he also received a law degree.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
Click here for the gallery "The Wire: Where Are they Now?" Robert F. Chew, a 52-year-old Baltimore actor and teacher who portrayed one of television's most unforgettable characters as Proposition Joe on HBO's “The Wire,” died Thursday of apparent heart failure in his sleep at his home in Northeast Baltimore, according to Clarice Chew, his sister. Mr. Chew, who appeared in “Homicide: Life on the Street” and “The Corner,” as well as “The Wire,” also taught and mentored child and young adult actors at Baltimore's Arena Players, a troupe he stayed with as his television career blossomed in David Simon HBO series.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
Pat Moran may very well have the coolest office in Baltimore. Not that anyone should be surprised by that. Moran, who first gained fame (or should that be notoriety?) as one of John Waters' Dreamlanders, is an Emmy-winning casting director who has worked on nearly every film and TV project to hit Baltimore in the past quarter-century. She's also an unabashed pack rat, whose happily eclectic tastes are reflected in the Canton office of Pat Moran & Associates, on the fourth floor of a rehabbed warehouse building.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | June 21, 1999
Carroll Players. "The Cemetery Club." 7 p.m. July 12-13 at VFW 467 in Westminster. Needed are four women and one man, ages 40 and older. Auditioners will read from the script. Call 410-239-3326 or 410-751-5841.Warner Brothers feature film. "The Replacements." Pat Moran & Associates casting for principal and day-player roles. Send head shot and resume to Pat Moran Casting, c/o The Broom Factory, 1301 S. Baylis St., Suite 425, Baltimore 21224. No calls.Sweet Adelines. Upper Chesapeake Chorus is looking for female singers interested in learning four-part harmony, a cappella style.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | May 13, 2001
Baltimore's past and present intermingled at the Maryland Film Festival's opening night party. Four hundred fifty guests converged at the Evergreen Carriage House after the world premiere of "Investigation of a Flame," a documentary about 1968's Catonsville Nine. In the evening's crowd were members of the anti-Vietnam War group -- who took files from the Selective Service office in Catonsville and burned them -- as well as people who supported, prosecuted and reported on them or sat on the jury determining their fate.
NEWS
By Christina Temes and Christina Temes,Special to Baltimoresun.com | August 4, 2005
From working the beat with the Baltimore police to warding off alien invasion, an assortment of roles for area actors are popping up as Baltimore becomes a popular filming location. Two major projects, the HBO series "The Wire" and the upcoming film "Invasion," are auditioning hopefuls for filming this September. "The Wire," a Baltimore-based police drama written and produced by David Simon of "Homicide: Life on the Street," will begin filming 13 episodes for its fourth season in September.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 19, 1992
When Pat Moran walked out of her house in the 800 block of Park Avenue one recent morning, she found vials of crack cocaine lying on the ground. She put them into a plastic bag, and she kept them, and she fumed about what to do with them.Last week, she decided: She shoved them in front of the mayor of Baltimore."Why is this happening?" Moran demanded.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke swallowed hard and said nothing.Moran, eyes blazing, copper-colored hair whipping about her face, hopped to her feet in Vesuvian fury.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2013
John J. Moran II, a Baltimore-born attorney who practiced in York, Pa., died of an apparent heart attack Monday at his home in Hallam, Pa. He was 66. The son of John J. Moran, an orchestra leader, and Grace Eleanor Schweitzer, who ran a neighborhood grocery store, he grew up in Beechfield. He attended St. Joseph's Monastery School and was a 1965 graduate of Mount St. Joseph's High School. He earned a bachelor's degree at the University of Baltimore, where he also received a law degree.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | April 8, 1994
The world premiere of John Waters' new film, "Serial Mom" at the Senator Theatre Tuesday evening was a star-studded happening. Besides John, celebrities included Kathleen Turner and her husband, Jay Weiss; Sam Waterston; Ricki Lake and her husband of less than two weeks, Rob Sussman; Mink Stole; Traci Lords, the daughter-in-law of Pat Moran, John's longtime right-hand person; Traci's husband, Brook Yeaton; Patricia Hearst and her husband, Bernard Shaw; Matthew...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
It was standing room only Thursday as family, friends and admirers of Robert Francell Chew said goodbye with a spirited and moving celebration of life ceremony for the actor known as Proposition Joe. More than 100 persons crowded into the chapel at the Calvin B. Scruggs Funeral Home in east Baltimore on a cold, snow-dusted morning. They ranged from other Baltimore actors who had won featured roles in HBO's "The Wire," like Felicia "Snoop" Pearson, to Raymond Parker, the high school music teacher who rook Chew under his wing at Patterson High, taught him to sing Italian opera and helped him get an audition that led to a four-year scholarship at Morgan State University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
Click here for the gallery "The Wire: Where Are they Now?" Robert F. Chew, a 52-year-old Baltimore actor and teacher who portrayed one of television's most unforgettable characters as Proposition Joe on HBO's “The Wire,” died Thursday of apparent heart failure in his sleep at his home in Northeast Baltimore, according to Clarice Chew, his sister. Mr. Chew, who appeared in “Homicide: Life on the Street” and “The Corner,” as well as “The Wire,” also taught and mentored child and young adult actors at Baltimore's Arena Players, a troupe he stayed with as his television career blossomed in David Simon HBO series.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Baltimore's Pat Moran won an Artio Award from the Casting Society of America for her work on HBO's "Game Change," the locally-produced film about the 2008 presidential election. The awards, which are considered the most prestigious in the casting industry, were announced earlier this week in Los Angeles by the C.S.A. The "Game Change" award marks the third time Moran has been honored by her peers. She also won Artios for casting on "The Wire" series in 2003 and the made-for-TV movie "Something the Lord Made" in 2004.
NEWS
By Christina Temes and Christina Temes,Special to Baltimoresun.com | August 4, 2005
From working the beat with the Baltimore police to warding off alien invasion, an assortment of roles for area actors are popping up as Baltimore becomes a popular filming location. Two major projects, the HBO series "The Wire" and the upcoming film "Invasion," are auditioning hopefuls for filming this September. "The Wire," a Baltimore-based police drama written and produced by David Simon of "Homicide: Life on the Street," will begin filming 13 episodes for its fourth season in September.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | May 13, 2001
Baltimore's past and present intermingled at the Maryland Film Festival's opening night party. Four hundred fifty guests converged at the Evergreen Carriage House after the world premiere of "Investigation of a Flame," a documentary about 1968's Catonsville Nine. In the evening's crowd were members of the anti-Vietnam War group -- who took files from the Selective Service office in Catonsville and burned them -- as well as people who supported, prosecuted and reported on them or sat on the jury determining their fate.
FEATURES
By KAREN REMESCH | March 15, 2001
Disney feature film. Pat Moran and Associates are casting for "Tuck Everlasting," directed by Jay Russell. Filming begins in the Baltimore area mid-April. Needed are three young actors, two for leads and one for a supporting role: a Caucasian male, 17-19, dashing and athletic; a Caucasian male, 22, intense with strong build; and a Caucasian female, 15, sweet and friendly. Send photo and resume to Pat Moran and Associates, 3500 Boston St., Suite 425, Baltimore 21224. Also, casting director Carlyn Davis holds an open call for extras, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday at the Unemployment Office at 124 N. Main St. in Berlin.
FEATURES
By A. M. CHAPLIN | September 15, 1991
IT WAS AFTER THEY'D FINISHED JOHN WATERS' movie "Cry-baby," says Gregg Mason. Director Barry Levinson had called to ask if Mr. Mason and his partner Pat Moran wanted to take on the casting of the movie "Avalon" as their next assignment.You and I would wait about four seconds before shouting "yes," but not Mr. Mason. He went to Montreal and sat on a rock and thought, "Do I want to go any further with this?"Eventually he did say yes, and Mason & Moran cast about 50 character parts for "Avalon," plus an incredible 6,000 to 7,000 background parts.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1999
Christine Mason didn't just do hairdos. She created "characters" on actors' and actresses' heads.Ms. Mason, whose behemoth beehives and other outrageous coiffeurs were comic highlights in five of Baltimore director John Waters' most popular films, died Monday of cervical cancer at home in Oliver Beach in eastern Baltimore County. She was 49.Friends recalled Ms. Mason as a woman of multiple talents whose varied career included stints as a French-style chef, performance artist, costume designer and concert promoter.
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