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By Marty McGee | April 25, 1991
Pat Day, whose election into the National Racing Museum Hall of Fame was announced earlier this week, said yesterday that he has chosen Summer Squall over Unbridled as his mount for the $750,000 Pimlico Special at Pimlico Race Course on May 11.
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NEWS
March 12, 2013
The Sun's recent article, "City police beef up patrols" (March 8), is so lacking in a grasp of reality that it not only didn't warrant font page, above the fold placement. The implication is that the Irish or those who claim to be on Saint Patrick's Day were somehow responsible for the thuggish, rather common behavior in and around the Inner Harbor last year, including the brutal and humiliating attack on a visitor to Charm City is, in a single word, pathetic. Given that The Sun would never have the courage to tell the truth about the events chronicled in the article, I'm left with the challenge of an analogy, so here it is. To say that the horror of what happened in and around the Inner Harbor last year is somehow related to a true Saint Patrick's Day celebration is like saying that an al-Qaida observance of 9-11 is the same as the solemn observance in the United States of those who died so unnecessarily.
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SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
Anyone who expected Pat Day to show rancor at being yanked off one of the Preakness favorites, Prince of Thieves, doesn't know Pat Day.Day, the jockey on the winning horse of the 121st Preakness, Louis Quatorze, and the whole gang involved with the horse were just delirious that things broke their way yesterday at Pimllico.The win was Day's fifth Preakness victory in 11 tries, including three in a row. Imagine not wanting this guy on your horse heading to Baltimore from Louisville, Ky.Of trainer D. Wayne Lukas' maneuver to replace Day on Prince of Thieves with Jerry Bailey, after Bailey lost derby winner Grindstone to an injury and retirement, Day replied, "I've been taken off horses plenty of times.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
P Day brought back more to Charles H. Hadry than the chance for another paycheck when he rejoined the Hadry stable last fall after a failed foray into New York. The 8-year-old horse whom Hadry bred, trained and owned brought renewal to the veteran trainer at a time when spirit meant more than money. Hadry, 72, perhaps the most respected horseman in Maryland, has cancer. Overseeing the return of his favorite horse, especially under such unusual circumstances, was a boost. "It's the best thing that could have happened to him," said Charles J. Hadry, his son. "Horses are his life, his job, all he cares about outside his family.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1995
Jockey Pat Day took the questions head on, until the final one."How do you feel about owning the Preakness?" someone said.Owning it?Yes, owning it. Day posted his second straight Preakness victory yesterday, this one aboard Timber Country, and his fourth in 10 tries. He has finished second three times.So how does Day, 41, feel about owning the Preakness?"I can't answer that," he said. "But I'm grateful to be here now."Day, who won last year with Tabasco Cat, with Tank's Prospect in 1985 and Summer Squall in 1990, was in front of the nation's turf writers because he found the key to getting a strong effort out of Timber Country.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 5, 1991
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Yesterday was an unforgettable day for everyone connected with Kentucky Derby winner Strike the Gold.Earlier on the Derby card, the colt's owner and trainer captured the $50,000-added Churchill Downs Handicap with Thirty Six Red, who ran seven furlongs in a fast 1 minute, 22 seconds.And in the race after the Derby, Greydar, a 4-year-old full brother to Strike the Gold, won a $24,00 allowance race. Both colts are by Alydar out of the mare Majestic Gold, by Hatchet Man.Strike the Gold was bought by B. Giles Brophy and his partners in a seven-horse package from Calumet Farm, his breeder, when the colt was a 2-year-old, then turned over to trainer Nick Zito.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
P Day brought back more to Charles H. Hadry than the chance for another paycheck when he rejoined the Hadry stable last fall after a failed foray into New York. The 8-year-old horse whom Hadry bred, trained and owned brought renewal to the veteran trainer at a time when spirit meant more than money. Hadry, 72, perhaps the most respected horseman in Maryland, has cancer. Overseeing the return of his favorite horse, especially under such unusual circumstances, was a boost. "It's the best thing that could have happened to him," said Charles J. Hadry, his son. "Horses are his life, his job, all he cares about outside his family.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
The Sun's recent article, "City police beef up patrols" (March 8), is so lacking in a grasp of reality that it not only didn't warrant font page, above the fold placement. The implication is that the Irish or those who claim to be on Saint Patrick's Day were somehow responsible for the thuggish, rather common behavior in and around the Inner Harbor last year, including the brutal and humiliating attack on a visitor to Charm City is, in a single word, pathetic. Given that The Sun would never have the courage to tell the truth about the events chronicled in the article, I'm left with the challenge of an analogy, so here it is. To say that the horror of what happened in and around the Inner Harbor last year is somehow related to a true Saint Patrick's Day celebration is like saying that an al-Qaida observance of 9-11 is the same as the solemn observance in the United States of those who died so unnecessarily.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | March 12, 2000
I grew up believing that you ate brisket to honor St. Patrick. On St. Patrick's Day, supper was either corned beef brisket or its cousin, roast beef brisket. I preferred the cousin, a brisket that had been dusted with seasoned flour, seared in a little oil, sprinkled with a package of dry onion soup and cooked in a heavy lidded pot in about 3/4 cup of water over low heat on the stove top. In keeping with Irish tradition, this brisket was cooked to death, bubbling on the burner for an entire afternoon.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2000
ARCADIA, Calif. -- Pat Day would arrive at the barn unannounced for his regular visit with the filly. He would slip into her stall quietly, as if looking in on a close friend's child. Those visits last summer at Saratoga forged a bond between the Hall of Fame jockey and the promising filly Surfside that remained strong through winter into spring. Today, rider and filly must draw deeply from that relationship if they're to accomplish that rare feat in their sport: win a horse race against colts.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2000
ARCADIA, Calif. -- Pat Day would arrive at the barn unannounced for his regular visit with the filly. He would slip into her stall quietly, as if looking in on a close friend's child. Those visits last summer at Saratoga forged a bond between the Hall of Fame jockey and the promising filly Surfside that remained strong through winter into spring. Today, rider and filly must draw deeply from that relationship if they're to accomplish that rare feat in their sport: win a horse race against colts.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | March 12, 2000
I grew up believing that you ate brisket to honor St. Patrick. On St. Patrick's Day, supper was either corned beef brisket or its cousin, roast beef brisket. I preferred the cousin, a brisket that had been dusted with seasoned flour, seared in a little oil, sprinkled with a package of dry onion soup and cooked in a heavy lidded pot in about 3/4 cup of water over low heat on the stove top. In keeping with Irish tradition, this brisket was cooked to death, bubbling on the burner for an entire afternoon.
SPORTS
By Billy Reed and Billy Reed,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 1998
The best Preakness jockey of his generation has an unlikely mount in tomorrow's 123rd running. Baby Hands, as Pat Day is known to trainer D. Wayne Lukas, will be aboard the Lukas-trained Baquero, a 20-1 shot in the morning line.When Lukas announced last Tuesday that he was entering Baquero in the Preakness, it was widely assumed that the trainer simply wanted to put in a "rabbit" to push Coronado's Quest on the lead and set up a late charge by Cape Town, his more highly regarded entrant. But yesterday Lukas denied that, saying that he had planned to run Baquero in the Preakness as soon as he heard that Favorite Trick, whom Day rode to a disappointing eighth-place finish in the Kentucky Derby, wouldn't be coming to Pimlico.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
Anyone who expected Pat Day to show rancor at being yanked off one of the Preakness favorites, Prince of Thieves, doesn't know Pat Day.Day, the jockey on the winning horse of the 121st Preakness, Louis Quatorze, and the whole gang involved with the horse were just delirious that things broke their way yesterday at Pimllico.The win was Day's fifth Preakness victory in 11 tries, including three in a row. Imagine not wanting this guy on your horse heading to Baltimore from Louisville, Ky.Of trainer D. Wayne Lukas' maneuver to replace Day on Prince of Thieves with Jerry Bailey, after Bailey lost derby winner Grindstone to an injury and retirement, Day replied, "I've been taken off horses plenty of times.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
The sun broke through early in the afternoon, well in time to provide a perfect backdrop for the 121st running of the Preakness Stakes. Then, it was just a matter of coming up with a perfect ending.Federal worker and once-a-year race buff Joe Paslow-ski of Alexandria, Va., said that had to involve jockey Pat Day. Said so as he was counting his money next to the ticket window on the second level of the Pimlico grandstand yesterday."I liked the name of the horse, and I liked the fact that Pat Day was on him," Paslowski said.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1996
After the Kentucky Derby, after jockey Jerry Bailey expertly guided Grindstone past 12 horses in the thrilling final half mile, D. Wayne Lukas described the ride as "textbook, one for the highlight films."A week later, after a knee injury had forced Grindstone's retirement and left Bailey without a Preakness mount, Lukas reacted. The trainer bumped Pat Day, one of the nation's top jockeys and winner of the past two Preaknesses, off Prince of Thieves and put Bailey on instead."Jerry absolutely seems to be in the zone right now," said Lukas, a former basketball coach.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1996
After the Kentucky Derby, after jockey Jerry Bailey expertly guided Grindstone past 12 horses in the thrilling final half mile, D. Wayne Lukas described the ride as "textbook, one for the highlight films."A week later, after a knee injury had forced Grindstone's retirement and left Bailey without a Preakness mount, Lukas reacted. The trainer bumped Pat Day, one of the nation's top jockeys and winner of the past two Preaknesses, off Prince of Thieves and put Bailey on instead."Jerry absolutely seems to be in the zone right now," said Lukas, a former basketball coach.
SPORTS
By Billy Reed and Billy Reed,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 1998
The best Preakness jockey of his generation has an unlikely mount in tomorrow's 123rd running. Baby Hands, as Pat Day is known to trainer D. Wayne Lukas, will be aboard the Lukas-trained Baquero, a 20-1 shot in the morning line.When Lukas announced last Tuesday that he was entering Baquero in the Preakness, it was widely assumed that the trainer simply wanted to put in a "rabbit" to push Coronado's Quest on the lead and set up a late charge by Cape Town, his more highly regarded entrant. But yesterday Lukas denied that, saying that he had planned to run Baquero in the Preakness as soon as he heard that Favorite Trick, whom Day rode to a disappointing eighth-place finish in the Kentucky Derby, wouldn't be coming to Pimlico.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1995
Jockey Pat Day took the questions head on, until the final one."How do you feel about owning the Preakness?" someone said.Owning it?Yes, owning it. Day posted his second straight Preakness victory yesterday, this one aboard Timber Country, and his fourth in 10 tries. He has finished second three times.So how does Day, 41, feel about owning the Preakness?"I can't answer that," he said. "But I'm grateful to be here now."Day, who won last year with Tabasco Cat, with Tank's Prospect in 1985 and Summer Squall in 1990, was in front of the nation's turf writers because he found the key to getting a strong effort out of Timber Country.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 5, 1991
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Yesterday was an unforgettable day for everyone connected with Kentucky Derby winner Strike the Gold.Earlier on the Derby card, the colt's owner and trainer captured the $50,000-added Churchill Downs Handicap with Thirty Six Red, who ran seven furlongs in a fast 1 minute, 22 seconds.And in the race after the Derby, Greydar, a 4-year-old full brother to Strike the Gold, won a $24,00 allowance race. Both colts are by Alydar out of the mare Majestic Gold, by Hatchet Man.Strike the Gold was bought by B. Giles Brophy and his partners in a seven-horse package from Calumet Farm, his breeder, when the colt was a 2-year-old, then turned over to trainer Nick Zito.
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