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Pat Conroy

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By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
Last year, Pat Conroy demonstrated his versatility for Towson, lining up as a long-stick midfielder and taking faceoffs. He did the same thing in the team's 8-7 decision over Georgetown on Saturday, winning 5-of-9 draws and picking up three ground balls. But Tigers coach Shawn Nadelen said he would prefer to have the sophomore concentrate on playing defense rather than taking faceoffs. “I'd rather have him stay in our defensive end of the field and not try to tax him too much as a faceoff guy,” Nadelen said Thursday.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
Last year, Pat Conroy demonstrated his versatility for Towson, lining up as a long-stick midfielder and taking faceoffs. He did the same thing in the team's 8-7 decision over Georgetown on Saturday, winning 5-of-9 draws and picking up three ground balls. But Tigers coach Shawn Nadelen said he would prefer to have the sophomore concentrate on playing defense rather than taking faceoffs. “I'd rather have him stay in our defensive end of the field and not try to tax him too much as a faceoff guy,” Nadelen said Thursday.
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By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2000
When all is well in the writing life of Pat Conroy, words flow to the page like a Low Country river -- rich with life, sweeping along toward something bigger and grander as the current builds strength and momentum. Yet, the waters are treacherous, too. Conroy tends to populate his novels with just about everyone who ever made his life miserable, and they emerge on the page as violent, tyrannical dads, beautiful but duplicitous moms, all of them lording it over fractured homes where horrible things come to pass.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2000
When all is well in the writing life of Pat Conroy, words flow to the page like a Low Country river -- rich with life, sweeping along toward something bigger and grander as the current builds strength and momentum. Yet, the waters are treacherous, too. Conroy tends to populate his novels with just about everyone who ever made his life miserable, and they emerge on the page as violent, tyrannical dads, beautiful but duplicitous moms, all of them lording it over fractured homes where horrible things come to pass.
FEATURES
By TIM WARREN | June 4, 1994
Fiction: "Beach Music," by Pat Conroy; "What I Lived For," by Joyce Carol Oates; "Closing Time," by Joseph Heller; "None to Accompany Me," by Nadine Gordimer; "Tales of the Mayfair Witches," by Anne Rice; "The Informers," by Bret Easton Ellis; "Fatheralong," by John Edgar Wideman; "A Son of the Circus," by John Irving.Nonfiction: "Rainbow People of God," by Desmond Tutu; "The Ransom of the Russian Art," by John McPhee; "All the Trouble in the World," by P. J. O'Rourke; "Saturday Night Live: The First Twenty Years," by John Head; "The Delany Sisters' Recipes for Living," by Sarah and A. Elizabeth Delany; "Baseball: An Illustrated History," by Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 7, 1995
Washington -- You can't help liking Pat Conroy. Forget all the stereotypes of the private, guarded writer when it comes to this guy. He's a big, outgoing man with a ready smile and an engaging manner. He's got a million stories, mostly about himself and his pretty weird family, and he tells even the sad ones with humor and charm. In fact, he may be the world's nicest egotist.He's a world-class raconteur, one who says he was influenced by the storytelling traditions of the two groups he belongs to: the Irish and Southerners.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 13, 1992
Pat Conroy's autobiographical novel "The Water Is Wide" would appear to be a solid foundation for a musical. Based on the author's experiences as a white teacher in a black school on an isolated island off the coast of South Carolina in 1969, it is brimming with sympathetic characters, liberalminded conflict and themes sufficiently uplifting to warrant breaking into song.Furthermore, the story proved its adaptability to another medium, as well as its audience appeal, when it was made into the 1974 movie "Conrack," starring Jon Voight.
FEATURES
By Frank Rizzo and Frank Rizzo,The Hartford Courant | December 24, 1991
NEW YORK -- After decades of being the quintessential private person, the reclusive diva, the reluctant star, Barbra Streisand is suddenly spilling her guts.There's Streisand being playful on the cover of Vanity Fair. There's Streisand being grilled by Mike Wallace on "60 Minutes." And there's Streisand being interviewed by a platoon of journalists during a recent weekend in Manhattan.The reason for this outpouring of personal detail has been to promote "The Prince of Tides," the new film that she produces, directs and stars in with Nick Nolte.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | June 4, 1994
Next year, the American Booksellers Association convention will set up in Chicago, which is supposed to become the permanent home of the annual Memorial Day gathering after years of bouncing from Washington to New York to Las Vegas to Miami. The Second City will have to do some work, though, to be as flamboyant a host as Los Angeles was this year.The surreal setting of Los Angeles proved the perfect backdrop for the latest ABA gathering, which ended Tuesday. In recent years, the convention has become more circus than business get-together, more hype than fostering good books; less about reading and more about show business.
FEATURES
March 27, 1999
Frankly, my dear, you can find someone else. Pat Conroy, author of "The Prince of Tides," has walked away from a deal to write a second sequel to Margaret Mitchell's 1936 "Gone With the Wind" after getting into a dispute with the executors of her estate. "I went through more negotiations with this `Gone With the Wind' than the Germans did in World War I with all the clauses at Versailles," Conroy told the New York Times.Johnny Carson on the mendRetired "Tonight Show" host Johnny Carson is doing well a week after quadruple bypass surgery, a hospital spokeswoman said yesterday, though he probably won't go home until after the weekend.
FEATURES
March 27, 1999
Frankly, my dear, you can find someone else. Pat Conroy, author of "The Prince of Tides," has walked away from a deal to write a second sequel to Margaret Mitchell's 1936 "Gone With the Wind" after getting into a dispute with the executors of her estate. "I went through more negotiations with this `Gone With the Wind' than the Germans did in World War I with all the clauses at Versailles," Conroy told the New York Times.Johnny Carson on the mendRetired "Tonight Show" host Johnny Carson is doing well a week after quadruple bypass surgery, a hospital spokeswoman said yesterday, though he probably won't go home until after the weekend.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 7, 1995
Washington -- You can't help liking Pat Conroy. Forget all the stereotypes of the private, guarded writer when it comes to this guy. He's a big, outgoing man with a ready smile and an engaging manner. He's got a million stories, mostly about himself and his pretty weird family, and he tells even the sad ones with humor and charm. In fact, he may be the world's nicest egotist.He's a world-class raconteur, one who says he was influenced by the storytelling traditions of the two groups he belongs to: the Irish and Southerners.
FEATURES
By Claudia Eller and Claudia Eller,Los Angeles Times | June 16, 1995
One only has to look at the astonishing opening weekend of Paramount Pictures' new action adventure thriller, "Congo," which was universally panned by critics, to be reminded of the power of the person who created the underlying material: "Jurassic Park" author Michael Crichton.The film's whopping $24.6 million opening, which shocked industry insiders, underscores the value to Hollywood of an exclusive club of best-selling writers, including Mr. Crichton, John Grisham and Tom Clancy, whose books consistently translate into big, big box office bucks.
FEATURES
By TIM WARREN | June 4, 1994
Fiction: "Beach Music," by Pat Conroy; "What I Lived For," by Joyce Carol Oates; "Closing Time," by Joseph Heller; "None to Accompany Me," by Nadine Gordimer; "Tales of the Mayfair Witches," by Anne Rice; "The Informers," by Bret Easton Ellis; "Fatheralong," by John Edgar Wideman; "A Son of the Circus," by John Irving.Nonfiction: "Rainbow People of God," by Desmond Tutu; "The Ransom of the Russian Art," by John McPhee; "All the Trouble in the World," by P. J. O'Rourke; "Saturday Night Live: The First Twenty Years," by John Head; "The Delany Sisters' Recipes for Living," by Sarah and A. Elizabeth Delany; "Baseball: An Illustrated History," by Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | June 4, 1994
Next year, the American Booksellers Association convention will set up in Chicago, which is supposed to become the permanent home of the annual Memorial Day gathering after years of bouncing from Washington to New York to Las Vegas to Miami. The Second City will have to do some work, though, to be as flamboyant a host as Los Angeles was this year.The surreal setting of Los Angeles proved the perfect backdrop for the latest ABA gathering, which ended Tuesday. In recent years, the convention has become more circus than business get-together, more hype than fostering good books; less about reading and more about show business.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | October 3, 1993
We all have Southern memories, even if we never set foot there. Generations of talented Southern writers have brought it home to us, from Margaret Mitchell to Thomas Wolfe to Eudora Welty to Pat Conroy -- the hot days and soft nights, the iced tea and bourbon and branch, the white columns and wicker furniture and the food: grits and fried chicken, shrimp and oysters, fresh tomatoes and corn, hot biscuits and country ham . . .All of these things are Nathalie...
FEATURES
By Claudia Eller and Claudia Eller,Los Angeles Times | June 16, 1995
One only has to look at the astonishing opening weekend of Paramount Pictures' new action adventure thriller, "Congo," which was universally panned by critics, to be reminded of the power of the person who created the underlying material: "Jurassic Park" author Michael Crichton.The film's whopping $24.6 million opening, which shocked industry insiders, underscores the value to Hollywood of an exclusive club of best-selling writers, including Mr. Crichton, John Grisham and Tom Clancy, whose books consistently translate into big, big box office bucks.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | October 3, 1993
We all have Southern memories, even if we never set foot there. Generations of talented Southern writers have brought it home to us, from Margaret Mitchell to Thomas Wolfe to Eudora Welty to Pat Conroy -- the hot days and soft nights, the iced tea and bourbon and branch, the white columns and wicker furniture and the food: grits and fried chicken, shrimp and oysters, fresh tomatoes and corn, hot biscuits and country ham . . .All of these things are Nathalie...
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 13, 1992
Pat Conroy's autobiographical novel "The Water Is Wide" would appear to be a solid foundation for a musical. Based on the author's experiences as a white teacher in a black school on an isolated island off the coast of South Carolina in 1969, it is brimming with sympathetic characters, liberalminded conflict and themes sufficiently uplifting to warrant breaking into song.Furthermore, the story proved its adaptability to another medium, as well as its audience appeal, when it was made into the 1974 movie "Conrack," starring Jon Voight.
FEATURES
By Frank Rizzo and Frank Rizzo,The Hartford Courant | December 24, 1991
NEW YORK -- After decades of being the quintessential private person, the reclusive diva, the reluctant star, Barbra Streisand is suddenly spilling her guts.There's Streisand being playful on the cover of Vanity Fair. There's Streisand being grilled by Mike Wallace on "60 Minutes." And there's Streisand being interviewed by a platoon of journalists during a recent weekend in Manhattan.The reason for this outpouring of personal detail has been to promote "The Prince of Tides," the new film that she produces, directs and stars in with Nick Nolte.
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