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By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2012
Chris Ford of Baltimore's Wit & Wisdom has been named "People's Best New Pastry Chef," a national award chosen by readers of Food & Wine magazine. Food & Wine, which has been naming America's best new chefs for 24 years, introduced a category for pastry chefs this year. In an online promotion for the new category, Food & Wine ran a poll in which readers were asked to select one pastry chef in each of the East, Central and West regions. The pastry chef with the most votes overall would win the honor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
The Four Seasons Food Truck Tour is coming to Baltimore.    Designed as a showcase for its culinary programs and for the individual chefs at its hotel properties, the Four Seasons' mobile unit is pulling into Baltimore on Monday for a weeklong stay as part of an East Coast tour that began in Boston on Sept. 15. In Baltimore, the truck will feature "street food" creations from Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore chefs Oliver Beckert, the hotel's executive chef, Zack Mills, executive chef for the hotel's main restaurant Wit & Wisdom , and Dyan Ng, the hotel's pastry chef.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
Chris Ford of Baltimore's Wit & Wisdom is the People's Best New Pastry Chef. The prize was based on a readers' poll in Food & Wine magazine. Food and Wine, which has been naming America's best new chefs for 24 years, introduced a category for pastry chefs this year. In an online promotion for its new category, Food & Wine ran an online feature called the People's Best New Pastry Chef , in which readers were asked to select one pastry chef each in the East, Central and West regions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
A lot can happen in the first three years of a restaurant's life. Things can go haywire. Investors panic, managers quit and staff moves on. But sometimes, not often enough, wisdom prevails. The restaurant considers what works, what doesn't. It reacts, but doesn't overreact, to diners' responses, and it changes things, thoughtfully, gradually, confidently. If you believe in the capacity for change, head down to Wit & Wisdom, the principal restaurant at the Four Seasons Baltimore Hotel.
NEWS
December 11, 1990
Services for Gillie E. Travis, a retired pastry chef at Baltimore school cafeterias, will be held at 10 a.m. today at St. James Episcopal Church, Arlington and Lafayette avenues.Mrs. Travis, who was 79 and lived on King William Drive in Catonsville, died Friday at Levindale after a long illness.She retired more than 10 years ago after working for the school district for many years.She was born Gillie E. Pickard in Reidsville, N.C., and came to Baltimore as a child.She graduated from Douglass High School and the Cortez Peters Business School.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | September 16, 2009
Kornel Korczynski, a retired East Baltimore baker, died of complications from dementia Sept. 8 at Carroll Hospital Center in Westminster. He was 88. Born in Baltimore, the son of Ukrainian immigrants, he was raised in Curtis Bay and Highlandtown. He was educated in city public schools and at St. Mary's Industrial School. During World War II, he served as a military policeman and baker in the Army. "When he was in the Army, the Germans taught him how to bake," said a brother, Emil Korczynski of Felton, Pa. After being discharged, he returned to Baltimore and opened the Dutch Oven Bakery on Mace Avenue in Essex.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
It's not too far from northwest Baltimore to Washington, but it's a long way from sponge cake with blue icing to Viennese Chocolate Fantasy Cake and Triple Chocolate Terrine. Ann Amernick knows, because that's the path she's traveled since growing up in Baltimore largely unaware of the culinary world (though "I loved Haussner's for the strawberry pie," she recalls) to being one of the more noted pastry chefs in the country.She has baked her famous cakes and tortes at the Big Cheese in Georgetown, Le Pavilion and Jean-Louis at the Watergate in D.C. and she was assistant pastry chef at the White House in 1980 and 1981.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2005
Gerhard K. Kadolph, a pastry chef and baker who worked at Dundalk and Highlandtown establishments and made the signature strawberry pie for the old Haussner's Restaurant, died of an infection May 20 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Dundalk resident was 79. Born in the Pomerania district of what was then eastern Germany and is now Poland, he became a bakery apprentice at 14. He worked alongside his uncle, also a baker, in Eberswalde near Berlin learning the trade. Drafted into the German navy at the end of World War II, Mr. Kadolph was assigned to a tugboat on the coast of the Netherlands.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
It's not too far from northwest Baltimore to Washington, but it's a long way from sponge cake with blue icing to Viennese Chocolate Fantasy Cake and Triple Chocolate Terrine. Ann Amernick knows, because that's the path she's traveled since growing up in Baltimore largely unaware of the culinary world (though "I loved Haussner's for the strawberry pie," she recalls) to being one of the more noted pastry chefs in the country.She has baked her famous cakes and tortes at the Big Cheese in Georgetown, Le Pavilion and Jean-Louis at the Watergate in D.C. and she was assistant pastry chef at the White House in 1980 and 1981.
NEWS
By Amy Scattergood and Amy Scattergood,Los Angeles Times | July 15, 2007
Call it the battle of the soft-shell crab. Quinn Hatfield, chef and co-owner of Hatfield's in Los Angeles, didn't want them on his menu -- they're best eaten simply, he thought, and he knew that they'd be so popular that he'd be cooking crabs all evening instead of artfully plating his signature dishes. But the restaurant's pastry chef disagreed. And Hatfield pan-fried crabs until they sold out. Hatfield's pastry chef admittedly has more clout than most. She's the restaurant's co-owner -- and the chef's wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
  Governor Martin O'Malley, on behalf of Chesapeake Bay watermen and the True Blue program that promotes Maryland Blue Crab sustainability, accepted a donation of $10,270 from Flying Dog Brewery and Old Bay on Wednesday at the beer company's Frederick taproom.  The money, according to Flying Dog director of communications Erin Weston, comes from a portion of proceeds from sales of the Flying Dog Dead Rise beer, which is a collaboration with...
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Customers of Towson's artisan bakery La Cakerie could easily mistake their surroundings for an enlarged dollhouse kitchen; high-pitched strains of pop music bounce off pink walls and the aroma of baking cake batter wafts through the air. Owner and executive chef Jason Hisley opened the West Allegheny Avenue location seven months ago, relocating from nearby West Chesapeake Avenue and joining La Cakerie's sales location in Mount Vernon. Listening to suggestions from a new crop of busy working professionals, Hisley expanded La Cakerie from its pastry roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Michael Carstens is the new executive chef for the Lord Baltimore Hotel. The chef, whose local experience includes stints at Harryman House in Reisterstown and Alizee American Bistro, will head all of the food and beverage operations at the recently renovated hotel, including its main dining space, French Kitchen. Carstens has previously worked in various positions for Hilton Worldwide and Sheraton Hotel and Resorts. He has apprenticed at the three-Michelin-starred restaurant Alinea in Chicago and at the French Laundry in California.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Baltimore-area chefs, including a team from the Bagby Restaurant Group, will be headed to New York City in January, where they'll be cooking at the James Beard House, a storied culinary venue named for the celebrated author, educator and champion of American cuisine. Chris Becker, the executive chef and chief operations officer of the Bagby Restaurant Group, will lead a crew from Bagby restaurants at a Chesapeake Bounty dinner on Jan. 15. And Ben Simpkins, the executive chef for the White Marsh-based Richardson Farms, will present a Winter Farm Harvest dinner at the Beard house on Jan. 23. The Chesapeake Bounty dinner marks the James Beard House debut for the chefs from the Bagby group, which includes Ten Ten American Bistro, Fleet Street Kitchen and Cunningham's, a new restaurant in Towson.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2013
Dooby's will be opening on Saturday, Oct. 26, according to owner Phil Han. The 75-seat eatery will occupy the ground-level space in the Park Plaza building that was once home to Indigma, one of the casualties of a December 2010 fire that swept through the building. Han said he gets asked a lot whether Dooby's will be a cafe or a restaurant. "We tell people we're a cafe-restaurant," Han said. "I think we are a little bit different. We're trying to introduce a new category to Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Dooby's will be opening on Oct. 26, according to owner Phil Han. The 75-seat eatery will occupy the ground-level space in the Park Plaza building space that was once home to Indigma, one of the casualties of a December 2010 fire that swept through the building. Han said he gets asked a lot whether Dooby's will be a cafe or a restaurant. "We tell people we're a cafe-restaurant," Han said. "I think we are a little bit different. We're trying to introduce a new category to Baltimore.
NEWS
By Eboni Preston and Eboni Preston,Sun Reporter | July 15, 2007
Former White House chef Roland Mesnier remembers the night that someone stole President Clinton's dessert. Mesnier had made a treat for the president, but it was missing when Clinton went to get it. Even with the Secret Service investigating, the dessert thief was never found. Mesnier related the story during a signing last week of his new book, Dessert University, at Starry Night Bakery in Westminster. In addition to telling stories from the White House, he answered questions and gave cooking tips.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | October 4, 2011
Even though there's something like 981 cooking competition shows out there (an estimate), we're still intrigued by Food Network's "Sweet Genius. "    The host/judge, acclaimed chef Ron Ben-Israel, is intriguingly mysterious and off-the-wall : ordering the chefs to cook frozen desserts with hard-boiled eggs? OK, then! Each episode features a new group of four pastry chefs competing for culinary glory ... and $10,000. Baltimore's Anisha Jagtap , 26, the pastry chef at Puffs & Pastries and the owner/chef at Baltimore Burger Bar, shows what she's made of on Thursday's episode (10 p.m.)
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
Chris Ford, whose inventive desserts have earned an avid following and widespread praise at the Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore, will be leaving his position as the hotel's pastry chef in October. Ford has accepted a job with the Thomas Keller Restaurant Group. Sometime after Oct. 11, his last day at the Four Seasons, Ford will be packing up his pastry bags and driving with his French bulldogs, Mac and Josephine, clear across the country to Beverly Hills, Calif., where he will be taking the position of pastry chef at Keller's Bouchon Bakery.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013
In the past few years, pastry crazes have managed to bring out the sweet tooth in just about everybody. Perhaps the fads are owed to the emergence of reality shows such as "D.C. Cupcakes," "The Cupcake Girls," "Cupcake Wars," .... and you get the idea. Whatever the origin, the burgeoning popularity of pastries has been fueled by creativity. The question is no longer what can you put on a pastry, but what can't you use to accentuate a baked treat. Now, with a doughnut craze in full swing, we're once again left trying to solve this delicious dilemma, as we stuff our faces with the glazed rings.
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