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By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
The 8-year-old Anne Arundel County boy who was suspended for biting a pastry into the shape of a gun received standing ovation and a lifetime membership to the National Rifle Association Wednesday night. At a fundraiser for Anne Arundel County Republicans, House Minority Leader Nicholaus R. Kipke presented Josh Welch with the membership, which cost $550, during a tongue-in-cheek presentation that involved a Pop-Tart fashioned into pistol and gun safety tips. Josh's March 1 suspension from Park Elementary School for chewing a pastry into the shape of a firearm captured national attention over how seriously students should be punished for such threats.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The case involving an Anne Arundel County elementary school student suspended last year after nibbling a pastry into the shape of a gun went before the county school board Wednesday, the latest attempt by the boy's parents to have the incident removed from his record. Joshua Welch, then a second-grader at Park Elementary school in Brooklyn Park, received a two-day suspension in March 2013 in a matter that drew national attention. The school system has argued that Joshua, who is now 9 and has been transferred to another school, was suspended not solely for the incident but for a series of behaviors.
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NEWS
March 10, 2013
In regard to the 7-year-old boy suspended from second grade for nibbling a breakfast pastry into the shape of a gun ("The smoking pastry," March 7), we must immediately ban pastries from the schools. They cause diabetes and obesity, and that kills 300,000 Americans a year. Ban the pastry if it would save the life if even one child! Deaths from objects nibbled into gun shapes? Zero. Theodore Houk, Lutherville
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
A lot can happen in the first three years of a restaurant's life. Things can go haywire. Investors panic, managers quit and staff moves on. But sometimes, not often enough, wisdom prevails. The restaurant considers what works, what doesn't. It reacts, but doesn't overreact, to diners' responses, and it changes things, thoughtfully, gradually, confidently. If you believe in the capacity for change, head down to Wit & Wisdom, the principal restaurant at the Four Seasons Baltimore Hotel.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | April 1, 2011
You don't have to know how to pronounce kolache, or spell it for that matter, to indulge in the pastry that originated in central Europe. All you need to know is that the Czech dessert is now at Kolache Kreations in Ellicott City, via Houston, Texas, thanks to Ileana Fernandez, who is actually Hispanic. So Howard County, isn't it? “There are multiple kolache franchises in Houston, hundreds even. You can also find kolache in doughnut shops,” says Fernandez, mother of three young children, who with her husband, Robert, moved to Ellicott City five years ago. There is a large population of Czech immigrants in Texas, and some towns hold kolache festivals to celebrate the pastry and its heritage.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
If anyone was at risk in the case of the Anne Arundel County second-grader who nibbled a strawberry pastry into the shape of a gun, it wasn't his classmates eating breakfast at Park Elementary School, where authorities say he waved the confection around. No, it was 7-year-old Josh Welch himself, who ate all that fat and sugar under the guise of a school nutrition program. Unfortunately, Park officials didn't see it that way. A school assistant principal told Josh's father, William "B.J.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
An attorney for the family of an Anne Arundel County second-grader suspended from school for nibbling a pastry into the shape of a gun said Monday that a top school official has denied the appeal to have the boy's record expunged. Robin Ficker, attorney for Park Elementary School student Josh Welch and his family, said he will now appeal to the county school board. Josh Welch was suspended in March for two days after school officials accused him of shaping the pastry into the form of a gun and waving it around.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
"This kid was just as imaginative and is just as adventurous as Steve Jobs was at the age of 7," said the attorney for the boy suspended from school after he nibbled a gun-shaped Pop-Tart ("Appeal filed in 7-year-old's suspension over pastry," March 19). I really don't believe Steve Jobs ever bit a pastry into the shape of a gun and then pointed it at other students. What the boy's attorney, and more importantly, his parents should be doing is sitting down with the 7-year-old and asking him what was going through his mind when he made the shape of a gun and pointed it at his classmates as if it were a game.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
A second-grade student at an Anne Arundel County elementary school was suspended for two days Friday after school officials said he chewed a breakfast pastry into the shape of a gun, an incident that has drawn widespread national media attention. The school, Park Elementary in Brooklyn Park, sent a letter home to parents regarding the incident. The child's father, William "B.J. " Welch, alerted local media to the incident, and Welch and his son Josh, 7, soon found themselves on CNN and Fox News, while conservative bloggers across the country opined on the matter.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
An attorney for an Anne Arundel County 7-year-old suspended from school for nibbling a breakfast pastry into the shape of a pistol is seeking to have the student's record expunged, and said he plans to appeal to Maryland's highest court if necessary. "This kid was just as imaginative and is just as adventurous as Steve Jobs was at the age of 7," said Robin Ficker, a Montgomery County attorney who has been hired by the student's father, J.B. Welch, to represent the family in the appeal.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
A hearing examiner recommended the Anne Arundel County school board uphold last year's two-day suspension of a second-grader who was accused of nibbling a pastry into the shape of a gun. But an attorney for the family of Joshua Welch said if the county board agrees, he's prepared to take the matter to the state Board of Education. "We're going to do whatever we can to clear this little kid's name and take the brand off his record," attorney Robin Ficker said. Hearing examiner Andrew Nussbaum, who was brought in by the school system to hear the case, sided with school officials in the sanctioning of Welch, then a 7-year-old Park Elementary School student whose suspension in March 2013 drew national media coverage and debate.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Anne Arundel County school officials say a second-grader suspended last year after nibbling a pastry into the shape of a gun wasn't sanctioned solely for that incident, but also for classroom disruptions preceding it. A school system-appointed hearing examiner is conducting a review of the two-day suspension of then-second grader Joshua Welch, who was sent home from Park Elementary School in Brooklyn Park in March 2013 after nibbling a pastry into...
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | December 2, 2013
Baltimore restaurateurs Tony Foreman and Cindy Wolf announced Monday that a second Petit Louis Bistro will open on the downtown Columbia lakefront.  The 6,943 square foot French restaurant, which the pair hope to open by the end of the year, will include outdoor seating, a pastry operation, private dining and event space, according to a news release.  "Cindy and I are truly excited about the details of the room and being on the lake,” said...
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
Anne Arundel County Public Schools will revisit a matter next month that garnered national attention earlier this year — the two-day suspension of an 8-year-old student accused of nibbling a breakfast pastry into the shape of a gun. School officials say during a closed session at its Sept. 11 meeting, the board will review an appeal by the family of then-Park Elementary School second-grader Joshua Welch, who in March was suspended after biting the pastry into a gun shape and waving it around.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Hey, wanna buy a Cronut? We're talking a real Cronut here, the original cream-filled, glazed cross between a croissant and doughnut that you can buy at only one place in the world: the Dominique Ansel Bakery, a French pastry shop in New York City 's SoHo neighborhood. The Ansel bakery doesn't ship Cronuts, and you'll have to get in line by 6:30 a.m. to get a shot at one - the maximum is two - of the 200 or so of the labor-intensive Cronuts that the small bakery churns out every day. Cronuts, which Ansel launched on May 10, are the pastry that ate Manhattan , and their fame keeps growing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013
In the past few years, pastry crazes have managed to bring out the sweet tooth in just about everybody. Perhaps the fads are owed to the emergence of reality shows such as "D.C. Cupcakes," "The Cupcake Girls," "Cupcake Wars," .... and you get the idea. Whatever the origin, the burgeoning popularity of pastries has been fueled by creativity. The question is no longer what can you put on a pastry, but what can't you use to accentuate a baked treat. Now, with a doughnut craze in full swing, we're once again left trying to solve this delicious dilemma, as we stuff our faces with the glazed rings.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
An attorney for the family of an Anne Arundel County 7-year-old suspended from school after being accused of nibbling a pastry into the shape of a gun says he met with school officials Wednesday in an attempt have the student's suspension expunged, but no resolution was reached. Park Elementary School student Josh Welch was suspended in March for two days after school officials accused him of shaping the pastry into the form of a gun and waving it around. School officials sent a letter home to parents saying the student had been removed from the classroom for making "inappropriate gestures that disrupted the class.
FEATURES
By James G. McCollam and James G. McCollam,Copley News Service | May 16, 1993
Q: What can you tell me about the vintage and value of this silver pastry serving set? They are marked "Italy."A: This silver-plated pastry knife and server were made in the early 1900s, and would probably sell for about $65 to $75 in good condition.Q: I am looking for information on the Bing & Grondahl "Nurse" figurine, No. 2379. Apparently, it is no longer in production; contacts with dealers (Copenhagen Collectibles in Denmark) have yielded no information.I would appreciate any information you can provide.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
An attorney for the family of an Anne Arundel County second-grader suspended from school for nibbling a pastry into the shape of a gun said Monday that a top school official has denied the appeal to have the boy's record expunged. Robin Ficker, attorney for Park Elementary School student Josh Welch and his family, said he will now appeal to the county school board. Josh Welch was suspended in March for two days after school officials accused him of shaping the pastry into the form of a gun and waving it around.
NEWS
By Patricia Schultheis | May 30, 2013
Back in the late 1950s, when I was in the seventh grade, I brought a deadly weapon to school. One morning, into the pocket of my Catholic school uniform, I slipped a knife. I then said good-bye to my mother and got on the bus for St. Ambrose School in Bridgeport, Conn. Although I knew that bringing the knife to school probably was testing the limits of acceptable behavior, I also knew that owning the knife was perfectly fine. Otherwise, my father would not have given it to me. A few months earlier, the knife had been my Christmas present from him. I remember folding back layers of tissue from an oddly shaped gift that clearly wasn't a pair of mittens or a book, until suddenly, the last layer of tissue gone, there it was - a knife!
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