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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 1997
There's a funny glossary of Yiddish words on the paper place-mats at Suburban House, but to get the jokes, you have to speak the language. Goy was one of the few words we recognized. Definition: someone who buys retail.It's a good thing the glossary didn't list goy as someone who doesn't know pastrami, or I would have taken offense. My shopping habits aside, I can recognize a great pastrami when I taste it, and this Pikesville restaurant serves it. We tried the lean, thinly sliced meat instead of corned beef in a variation of a Reuben here.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Shapiro's Cafe was a little erratic when it opened. Its hours of operation seemed whimsical, and the staff sometimes acted surprised when customers walked in. But the midtown spot has settled into a groove, and now Shapiro's feel like a permanent part of the landscape. For one thing, word got out about Shapiro's specialties, namely house-prepared pastrami that some folks thought tasted like Lombard Street's, and shawarma that impressed mavens who insist they know the real thing when they see it. Its location has helped, too. When it opened in the spring of 2010, I wrote that Shapiro's was convenient to the University of Baltimore.
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NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | August 2, 1991
Washington. -- When the government propounded its new Code of Ethics last week, we ink-stained wretches of the press were briefly disturbed. It appeared that under the new rules we no longer could take a bureaucrat to lunch. Freedom of the press was being abridged!Then we recalled that under the old rules we never took a bureaucrat to lunch. This is not because bureaucrats are too noble; it is because we are too cheap. On that comforting thought we collapsed into the easy chairs of the press gallery and gave the code a closer look.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew F. Lallo, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2012
The Corned Beef Factory in Highlandtown is just over two years old, a mere infant compared to the revered decades old corned beef establishments that have made Lombard Street in downtown Baltimore a destination for generations of corned beef and pastrami lovers. But the Corned Beef Factory is proof that you don't need almost a century of experience to deliver a great sandwich. The formula for constructing this iconic and delicious sandwich is so simple that it is amazing to see how many restaurants get it wrong.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 5, 1991
I believe in bootlicking boosterism as much as any columnist, so if you want to tell me that Baltimore has the best crabcakes, the nicest harbor and the most plentiful downtown parking in the world, hey, I'll pass it on.But I have to draw the line when it comes to pastrami. Journalistic integrity and my own taste buds demand it.Loyal readers (i.e., blood relatives) know that I am somewhat of a pastrami expert. I have eaten it in such exotic and unlikely locations as Saudi Arabia, Beirut, Hong Kong and Los Angeles.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | April 10, 1992
NEW YORK -- Good Roger sat in the back of the Bill Clinton press bus writing down the questions he was going to ask the candidate.Really good reporters always write down their questions in advance. So you can bet that before he went on the air, Phil Donahue wrote: "So tell me, Bill, you still fooling around or what?"But Good Roger did not know what to ask Bill Clinton first."Should I begin with a question on the International Monetary Fund?" Good Roger mused to himself. "Or hit him with a hardball on our acid rain pacts with Ottawa?"
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 22, 1996
IN WHAT I HOPE will become a continuing enterprise, I revisited the mysteries of pastrami. Two weeks ago I inquired into the background of "Romanian pastrami." After making several phone calls to delis in Baltimore and New York, and after polishing off a couple of sandwiches, I came to tentative conclusions about the name and the meat.I figured pastrami was called "Romanian" because the Romanians were the countrymen who perfected the art of curing and smoking the meat. The meat I decided, came from the belly of a steer and was fatter than brisket.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 8, 1996
A GOOD, HOT pastrami sandwich can lift your spirits. The other night, for instance, I felt harried, hungry and hangdog. Then I stopped by Nates & Leons, a deli with an old Baltimore name and a new location, at the corner of Pratt and Howard streets, for some overstuffed sustenance.Soon I was reveling in the delicious trinity of pleasures -- warm meat, spicy mustard and crisp rye bread -- that only a hot #F pastrami sandwich can deliver. With each bite, my hunger abated and my mood improved.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 9, 1993
As soon as she opened her mouth, I knew I was in the right place.There was no: "Hiya, hon, what'll you have?"There was no: "Are you ready to order now, dear?"Instead, the waitress said: "Yeah?"And I knew that a real New York deli had finally arrived in the Baltimore area.Two tables down, a black guy called out: "You got knishes, today?"The waitress, whose name tag said "Mouth" but whose real name is Becky Goldstein, looked over at the long, gleaming, glass-enclosed deli counter behind her."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | February 28, 2008
In Yiddish, a "fresser" is a glutton. At Suburban House, a fresser is a valued customer. This Jewish coffee shop devotes a section of the menu to what it calls the Fresser's Club, offering sandwiches overstuffed with just about any salted, garlicky meat imaginable, including pastrami, turkey, tongue and brisket. -- Poor:]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
You can eat upstairs or downstairs at Shapiro's Cafe, at 7 W. Preston St., near the University of Baltimore in Mount Vernon. The fare — deli sandwiches and Middle Eastern wraps — is the same in both areas, but the downstairs caters to the carry-out crowd and the upstairs is aimed at the sit-down set. The upstairs, a space once occupied by Sylvan Beach ice cream shop, seems to be a spot designed to attract faculty members....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | December 25, 2008
1019 E. Lombard St., 410-563-2666. Open 8 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays, 8 a.m-5 p.m. Sundays Good Jewish delicatessen that it is, Attman's is open today, Christmas Day, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. December is busy at the deli as exiles return to the old East Lombard Street neighborhood for the palaver and the pastrami. There is often a line of customers stretching along the counter, all the way to the back of the narrow front room. You can sit at the few tables in the adjoining Kibbitz Room, or you can take out, but first you have to order.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | February 28, 2008
In Yiddish, a "fresser" is a glutton. At Suburban House, a fresser is a valued customer. This Jewish coffee shop devotes a section of the menu to what it calls the Fresser's Club, offering sandwiches overstuffed with just about any salted, garlicky meat imaginable, including pastrami, turkey, tongue and brisket. -- Poor:]
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | May 22, 2005
Being both a special occasion restaurant and a hotel dining room is a tough balancing act. A few places manage it -- Hampton's in Harbor Court comes to mind -- but for the Inn at the Colonnade, it's not so easy. After all, Harbor Court has a second, less-formal dining room. What this means is that you could be going to the Club at the Colonnade to celebrate your wedding anniversary and be eating next to someone wearing a baseball cap. That happened to me on my first visit a couple of months ago (sitting next to the cap, not having a wedding anniversary)
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | March 4, 1998
WHAT IS THIS?" the kids asked when a platter of corned beef was placed on our supper table.I rolled my eyes with disbelief. My offspring had failed to recognize corned beef, a traditional Irish dish. I was thankful that their grandmother or relatives on the Irish side of our family were not able to hear this remark.When I was a kid I was familiar with corned beef. It was the bright red meat that showed up on your plate with boiled potatoes and hunks of cabbage. Hours before you ate it, you smelled it cooking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 1997
There's a funny glossary of Yiddish words on the paper place-mats at Suburban House, but to get the jokes, you have to speak the language. Goy was one of the few words we recognized. Definition: someone who buys retail.It's a good thing the glossary didn't list goy as someone who doesn't know pastrami, or I would have taken offense. My shopping habits aside, I can recognize a great pastrami when I taste it, and this Pikesville restaurant serves it. We tried the lean, thinly sliced meat instead of corned beef in a variation of a Reuben here.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | December 25, 2008
1019 E. Lombard St., 410-563-2666. Open 8 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays, 8 a.m-5 p.m. Sundays Good Jewish delicatessen that it is, Attman's is open today, Christmas Day, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. December is busy at the deli as exiles return to the old East Lombard Street neighborhood for the palaver and the pastrami. There is often a line of customers stretching along the counter, all the way to the back of the narrow front room. You can sit at the few tables in the adjoining Kibbitz Room, or you can take out, but first you have to order.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
You can eat upstairs or downstairs at Shapiro's Cafe, at 7 W. Preston St., near the University of Baltimore in Mount Vernon. The fare — deli sandwiches and Middle Eastern wraps — is the same in both areas, but the downstairs caters to the carry-out crowd and the upstairs is aimed at the sit-down set. The upstairs, a space once occupied by Sylvan Beach ice cream shop, seems to be a spot designed to attract faculty members....
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | September 12, 1997
On Wednesday, Eric Davis took two hours of chemotherapy treatment at Johns Hopkins Hospital.Yesterday, he took three rounds of swings during batting practice at Camden Yards.Now there's a comeback."And he looks great, too," Orioles hitting coach Rick Down said after watching Davis before last night's game against the Yankees. "He's got his power, he's got his quickness. It's like he never missed a day."Has cancer ever looked like this before?Not often enough, that's for sure.Davis is a walking contradiction to the sallow faces, broken spirits and other depressing images so often conjured by the disease and its long, painful recoveries.
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