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By Lou Cedrone | December 11, 1991
For a while, ''Pastime'' moves like a TV movie in search of commercials, then almost surprisingly takes a turn for the better, thanks to some excellent performances and a script that does novel things with a familiar plot.William Russ plays Roy Dean Bream, a 41-year-old baseball player. He has served some time as a pitcher with the majors, but now he's a reliever with a D team whose younger members treat him as a has-been.Bream doesn't seem to notice. A truly gentle soul, he is also rather naive, a rube, really, but we should all know rubes like this.
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By David Horsey | June 17, 2014
Given that some sort of horrific, headline-grabbing school shooting now occurs in the United States at a rate of once a week, it's hard to argue against the idea that gun violence is as much a national pastime as baseball. Unlike baseball, however, the season never ends. In just the last couple of weeks, troubled loners brought guns and death to a college campus in Seattle and a high school near Portland, and a couple of anti-government misfits went on a deadly rampage in Las Vegas.
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By Margo Harakas and Margo Harakas,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | April 18, 1994
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- "Cloudless sulphur," says Hal Wiedemann pointing at a flapping leaf in the air."Palamedes," someone else shouts out, motioning in the opposite direction.These early morning stalkers are in pursuit of a small and vibrant prey. Hither and yon it flits, with the entourage futilely trying to follow.Eyes, some boosted with binoculars, scan the trees, the underbrush, the low-lying vegetation round their feet. "Up there," says a self-appointed scout, directing attention with a walking stick.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
Frederick voters may notice a theme to their primary ballots next month: Young for state senator. Young for county executive. Young for county school board. Young for state delegate. Politics, after all, is the Young family business. "I was driving the other day, and I literally saw all four of their campaign signs on the same corner," said Todd Anderson, a federal contractor who lives in the city of Frederick. "I guess we've got kind of a Kennedy clan here. " The family's dominance in city and county politics is measured in decades.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2002
In the wake of a botched All-Star Game, amid rumors of illegal steroid use on the field, and in the shadow of growing disparity between rich teams and poor, the 2002 baseball world holds its breath. The most recent Collective Bargaining Agreement expired a year ago. Players' Association chief Donald Fehr aims to shut out any excuse the owners might have for imposing a salary cap this off-season. It doesn't seem to matter that a cap might be vital to the game's future health. The looming question, then: Are the players going to strike?
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 22, 1996
They could always cancel the NFL season and just televise the lawsuits instead.The business organizations of Maryland ought to trash the state less and promote business development more.Greece without Papandreou will force a lot of people to find something else to be angry about.The pastime is changing. First the Orioles will play National League teams. If that works, they will play Australian, ladies' and hockey teams. After that . . .
NEWS
May 20, 2005
The gudgeon - another name for killifish or minnows - were running on a spring day in Howard County 150 years ago, according to an account from The Sunon May 7, 1855, which describes an outing near Elkridge: "On Saturday, not less than five hundred persons visited the Patapsco, at the Relay House, to indulge in the pastime of gudgeon fishing. The day was rather cool, and luck was not so good as usual, yet a fair number of the finny tribe were captured. "At one time in the afternoon, every five feet of ground along the river banks, for some distance below the railroad viaduct, had an angler on it, patiently awaiting a nibble.
NEWS
By Gregory N. Krolczyk | June 30, 1991
His name is Paul Giacomin. He is 24 years old. He is looking for the mother he left behind many years ago. Unable to find anything but dead-ends, Paul calls on the man who helped him long ago when he needed to get away from his parents: Spenser.His name is Luke. He's about 8 years old. He killed his foste brother. The D.A. wants to send him to jail. Others, those who are hiding him, know that Luke is just as much a victim as the baby he killed. They know whom to turn to to help them get their proof: Burke.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2003
NOW OR NEVER New-age solo pianist George Winston plays a concert with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra coinciding with the release of his 20th-anniversary recording, Winter Into Spring. The concert is Sunday at 3 p.m. at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $28-$48. Call 410-783-8024. COMING UP Local song stylist Ruby Glover leads a workshop called Holiday Sing! Saturday from noon to 1:30 p.m. Kids ages 7 to 13 are invited to the free event, at which they will learn the sounds and moods of many instruments, about different styles of music and how to sing as an ensemble.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT NNTC | June 26, 1994
So, let's assume there really is a baseball strike on the horizon. True fans of the National Pasttime will need to turn somewhere, anywhere, for a baseball fix. You could watch the World Cup (yawn) or find solace from the cinema, which has produced no shortage of diamond-related flicks. "Winners and Losers" turns Siskel and Ebert to guide your baseball movie selections.2(MOVIES.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..COMMENT"Pastime" ... ..Winner .. .. .. .Little known gem about older.. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. ..white minor-leaguer befriending.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 19, 2014
Everybody's got something. Maybe it's something you were born with, maybe something that happened to you, maybe something you did to yourself through bad habits or neglect. But everybody's got something, some physical or emotional blemish measuring the distance from you to perfection. Maybe you're a short guy or a gawky woman. Maybe you're ugly. Maybe you've got cellulite, depression, anorexia, alcoholism, gingivitis, psoriasis or a big nose. Maybe you're fat. Gabourey Sidibe is fat. Morbidly obese, to be exact.
NEWS
August 15, 2012
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s recent column expressed the common view that most Greeks don't value "enterprise" because they've become dependent on overly generous government benefits that have ruined their economy ("America isn't Greece - at least not yet," Aug. 12). Yet I have struggled to reconcile the idea of the lavish public pensions he talks about with the images of newly homeless Greek pensioners picking through garbage for food as a result of EU-imposed austerity measures. Something seemed amiss.¿¿ The Greek government's financial problems come down to one thing: Tax evasion.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2011
They'd just arrived at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County for a summer of study, willing to trade warm-weather leisure for that delicious moment — in the classroom, science lab or internship — when the light bulb goes on. Suddenly the real light bulbs went out, and stayed out. Super-wired college students, unable to recharge laptops or cellphones, had been learning about life unplugged at UMBC since Thursday, when a transformer blew...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
It used to be that Halloween meant hay rides, haunted houses and corn mazes. But the past few years have seen the growth of a new harvest tradition — projectile pumpkins. Across the country, families are flocking to roadside farms every autumn to launch orange gourds at ungodly speeds at targets planted in a field hundreds of feet away and watch them go splat. "There's something about firing a pumpkin at 75 miles an hour that's very transporting," says Karen Connelly, 47, of Catonsville.
NEWS
September 23, 2008
Please forgive Baltimore sports fans for feeling so good. Yesterday marked not only the beginning of fall but also the city's ascendent position in this nation's favorite autumnal pastime (and it isn't raking leaves). The Ravens are in first place in the AFC North and all is right with the world. The usual sports prognosticators didn't predict this before the National Football League season started, and perhaps that's what makes it so sweet. An opportunity to forget about the Orioles - now destined to finish the season at the bottom of the American League East and relegated to the role of visiting patsy for Sunday's final game at Yankee Stadium - doesn't hurt either.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2008
The Presidential Pet Museum, with artifacts such as shaggy locks of hair from President Ronald Reagan's Bouvier des Flandres, Lucky, and a painting of President Bill Clinton's chocolate Labrador, Buddy, has gone south. The quirky downtown Annapolis attraction closed shop and sent its exhibits to Presidents Park, an equally quirky museum in Williamsburg, Va., featuring 18-foot-tall busts of the 43 U.S. presidents. Claire McLean, who began the pet museum on the grounds of her Lothian farmhouse in 1999 and moved it to a tiny Maryland Avenue storefront a year ago, said she didn't make the decision lightly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | December 23, 1994
Sonny Glassner calls his new cafe "spectacular, with an arty contemporary look." He should know, because he and his wife, Laurie, own Louis Mazor Inc., the interior design firm in the same shopping center. Glasz Cafe, which opened a week ago Thursday in Lake Falls Village, is the latest of Baltimore's espresso bars, with gourmet-prepared food and sandwiches by Nona Neilsen-Parker of Culinary Capers Catering.* Penny's Crab Garden has opened where Spittel's in Catonsville used to be, at 1115 N. Rolling Road.
NEWS
September 23, 2008
Please forgive Baltimore sports fans for feeling so good. Yesterday marked not only the beginning of fall but also the city's ascendent position in this nation's favorite autumnal pastime (and it isn't raking leaves). The Ravens are in first place in the AFC North and all is right with the world. The usual sports prognosticators didn't predict this before the National Football League season started, and perhaps that's what makes it so sweet. An opportunity to forget about the Orioles - now destined to finish the season at the bottom of the American League East and relegated to the role of visiting patsy for Sunday's final game at Yankee Stadium - doesn't hurt either.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 25, 2007
These are desperate times for sledding and its urban fans. The scant inch of snow that greeted Northeasterners on a recent Sunday morning drove them to the nearest park, clutching fleets of brightly colored plastic sleds, eager to catch any snow for the few hours that it lasted. "We wanted to get out today because you never know when you'll get more snow," said Paul Model, who was holding an inflatable inner tube sled for his son, Corey, 9. Anyone who didn't already have a sled stashed in his closet that morning might have been out of luck: Toy retailers, in New York and across the country, have largely pushed sleds and toboggans off their shelves and out of their catalog pages.
NEWS
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | July 29, 2007
What a week for baseball! In a picture-postcard setting amid the leafy Adirondack Mountains in upstate New York, a crowd of better than 50,000 will be on hand today to watch Orioles "Iron Man" Cal Ripken Jr. and San Diego Padres superstar Tony Gwynn join the game's immortals as they're inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. At the same time, many sports fans will be focusing on Barry Bonds, the prickly San Francisco Giants slugger dogged by steroid-use rumors, who's on the verge of breaking the most hallowed record in all of sports: the all-time home run title held by the great Hank Aaron.
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