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NEWS
November 15, 2009
Exhibit featuring the works of potter Winnie Coggins and pastel artist Barbara Steinacker will be on display through Dec. 4 at Artists Gallery, 10227 Wincopin Circle. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays-Fridays and 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturdays. Call 410-740-8249 for more information.
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FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
First comes love, then comes marriage and then comes time to pick out the baby carriage - and decorate the nursery. Already the tabloids are speculating on the room where England's heir to the throne will lay his royal head when Prince William's and Kate Middleton's baby is born in July. And even though Kim Kardashian and Kanye West aren't quite in sync with the old rhyme, the gossip magazines are anticipating the extravagant nursery the couple will add to their $11 million mansion in Bel Air. Not to mention the nursery that Joe Flacco and his wife, Dana, can create for their second child with the Ravens quarterback's new $120.6 million deal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric Adams MITCHELL GALLERY St. John's College, Annapolis. Benefit show and sale | May 31, 1991
RENAISSANCE FINE ARTS GALLERY1809 Reisterstown Road, Pikesville. "Pastels on Paper and Serigraphs by Israeli artist Zule."Colorful, lively and highly romantic images of the cafe society of Buenos Aires during the '20s and '30s highlight this exhibit (through June 10) by Argentina-born artist Zule. Zule, who emigrated to Israel in 1962 and continues to live there, has 50 works on display. They are pastels on paper (painted entirely with her thumbs) or acrylic on canvas (done with a paintbrush)
NEWS
November 22, 2009
Exhibit featuring the works of potter Winnie Coggins and pastel artist Barbara Steinacker will be on display through Dec. 4 at Artists Gallery, 10227 Wincopin Circle. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays-Fridays and 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturdays. Call 410-740-8249 for more information.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1991
819 GALLERY817 S. Broadway, Fells Point. "Songscapes"Katharine Brieger is a long-distance runner whose abstract expressionist pastels depict her spiritual reaction to the outdoors. Based in landscape, her works are described by the artist as music-like interior landscapes let out, onto the paper, "dissolving the psychological gap between the interior and the exterior." As is suggested by such titles as "Songs From Within," "Natural Drift," "Glacial Action," "Borealis" and "Absence of Lyrics," the textures and the edges are "soft, the colors, warm and sensual."
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2004
While the word pastel suggests the soft colors of spring, artists know there is much more depth to the artistic tools by the same name. "Pastels are the purest form of pigment," said Jack Pardue, president of the Maryland Pastel Society. And they come in a wide spectrum of colors. "It's a very gutsy medium if you use it properly," he said. Several dozen vibrant pastels by society members will be on exhibit at the Columbia Association Art Center, starting today. The display is to continue through Feb. 8, with a reception scheduled from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Jan. 15. Pardue explained that pastels can be made into a point for fine lines and details, or the broad side can be swept across the paper for paintlike strokes.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 27, 2001
When photography was invented in 1839, some observers predicted that painters would soon be put out of business by the camera's incredible powers of imitation. That never happened, of course. While daguerreotypes did replace miniature painted portraits, the art of painting in general reacted by gradually moving away from literal representation, a process that eventually gave rise to the various abstract aesthetics of the modernist era. Still, what goes around comes around, and it was probably only a matter of time before painters decided to challenge the camera's mastery of illusion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | September 28, 2006
About three years ago, painter Lisa Kyle started focusing on landscapes. The result of her work, Landscapes: Near and Far, will hang at La Terra Gallery starting Monday. Her goal is to evoke a particular emotion or memory of a place in the viewer's mind -- even if they've never been to the land portrayed in Kyle's acrylics and pastels. La Terra Gallery is at 4001 Falls Road. Landscapes: Near and Far opens Monday and runs through Oct. 31. There will be an opening reception 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Oct. 5. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | July 20, 2006
`The Disappearing Barn' Monkton native Monty McCausland's pastels -- on display at the Gallery at MCAC -- are local scenes that border on the abstract. McCausland creates his works at dusk, often when fog blurs the landscape, said gallery co-owner Tim Satterfield. "I think that's what makes his work attractive," Satterfield said. "You can recognize something you know, but you feel the abstraction in it." The Gallery at MCAC hosts The Disappearing Barn today through Sept. 4. The reception is 3 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday.
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
Pastels were in and so were white shoes. T-shirts and skinny ties were all the rage. Socks, on the other hand, were out, out, out. The rule-busting costumes in the TV show Miami Vice set fashion trends for men like few other programs have and still affect fashion today. "It's hard to overestimate the impact of the TV show in terms of fashion, and not just because it introduced the world to pastels and wearing shoes with no socks," says Tyler Thoreson, executive editor of Men.Style.com.
NEWS
November 15, 2009
Today 'The Bike Project: A Visual, Literary, and Cinematic Celebration of Biking in Our World' Exhibit will be on display through today at Howard County Community College's Rouse Company Foundation Gallery and the Art Department Gallery, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway. Exhibit includes writing, artwork and photographs that explore the biking experience. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 410-772-4512. Jazz concert Bassist Max Murray, drummer Frank Russo and pianist Alan Blackman perform at 4 p.m. in Howard Community College's Monteabaro Recital Hall, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | March 26, 2008
Saturday evening's concert by the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra may have been billed as a Spring Rhapsody, but if anyone came to Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts expecting pastel hues and light, frilly fare, they got disabused of those notions in a hurry. With works by Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakoff, Sergei Rachmaninoff and Richard Strauss on the bill, it was a night of big sounds and grand gestures. The program began with Rimsky's "Russian Easter Overture," a festive depiction of Russian Orthodoxy's Easter liturgy, complete with incense, icons, glowing candles, bearded priests, modal chants, fluttering angels and church bells chiming to the glory of Mother Russia's earthy, exotic celebration of the Resurrection.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | September 28, 2006
About three years ago, painter Lisa Kyle started focusing on landscapes. The result of her work, Landscapes: Near and Far, will hang at La Terra Gallery starting Monday. Her goal is to evoke a particular emotion or memory of a place in the viewer's mind -- even if they've never been to the land portrayed in Kyle's acrylics and pastels. La Terra Gallery is at 4001 Falls Road. Landscapes: Near and Far opens Monday and runs through Oct. 31. There will be an opening reception 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Oct. 5. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays.
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
Pastels were in and so were white shoes. T-shirts and skinny ties were all the rage. Socks, on the other hand, were out, out, out. The rule-busting costumes in the TV show Miami Vice set fashion trends for men like few other programs have and still affect fashion today. "It's hard to overestimate the impact of the TV show in terms of fashion, and not just because it introduced the world to pastels and wearing shoes with no socks," says Tyler Thoreson, executive editor of Men.Style.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | July 20, 2006
`The Disappearing Barn' Monkton native Monty McCausland's pastels -- on display at the Gallery at MCAC -- are local scenes that border on the abstract. McCausland creates his works at dusk, often when fog blurs the landscape, said gallery co-owner Tim Satterfield. "I think that's what makes his work attractive," Satterfield said. "You can recognize something you know, but you feel the abstraction in it." The Gallery at MCAC hosts The Disappearing Barn today through Sept. 4. The reception is 3 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 2006
With a book about Cezanne lying in his lap, James Hopkins sat up in his bed and adjusted a two-tier tray to the right height. He put on a black beret, pulled three sable-tip brushes from a cup, and took tubes of watercolor paint from a wooden box. The 75-year-old painter squeezed nickel-sized splotches of color onto a palette. After dabbing a brush in an ultramarine blue, he made strokes on the paper with a flourish and a purpose, stopping briefly at times to scrutinize his work. The Harford County native has painted for 25 years, but he has spent the past 15 years battling prostate cancer.
FEATURES
By Yolanda Garfield | April 25, 1993
Donna Reed would never set her table with four different kinds of dishes. But hey, welcome to the '90s. Retro is hot. Strict interpretation of the classic '50s style, is not.At Zooks, a shop where 20th-century collectibles are taken seriously, owner/manager Stephen Basel explains that clients today put value in objects that make them smile. The '50s were full of fun and kitsch, colored in pastels. Modern meant better. Labor-saving devices were coming into the market. People were optimistic.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2004
Think pink. If you're picturing ballerina shoes or a flouncy sundress - pretty, girlie, feminine things - then you're way behind the times. These days, pink is popping up in the most unlikely places. Over hairy chests. Covering bulging biceps. Atop a buzz cut. This is the summer of the masculine pink. Rappers, politicians, business types, inner-city boys on the city bus - all dressed in bubble gum, cotton candy, sunset pinks. For them, and other confident men, pink is the new white. "Pink is just fly," said Kenny McAllister, who studies lifestyle trends at the New York-based marketing company AMPdi.
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