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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
For 60 years, Miriam Konigsberg has watched her Ashburton neighbors come and go. She saw the waves of white Anglo-Saxon Protestants leaving when Jewish families began to move in, and another exodus when blacks began to buy homes. This weekend, past and present residents of the tree-lined Northwest Baltimore neighborhood plan to gather across racial and religious lines for a reunion. At a recent block party, Konigsberg, a 92-year-old Jewish woman, spoke to her neighbors of what she had seen since 1941: "When we moved in, Ashburton was all Christian, and it didn't take long for them to run away from `the Jews.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
In a cabin built in the 1750s, just a few hundred feet from a 201-year-old stone bridge across the quiet Casselman River, a man sits at a slab of a wooden table, an array of carving tools spread before him. The rush of traffic from nearby Alternate U.S. 40, also known as Route 40, does not bother Gary Yoder. Nor does the "thump-thump-thump" of the weaving loom from the cabin next door. The most celebrated crafter of wooden bird sculptures in Western Maryland is too engrossed to notice.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 15, 1995
Its past and present presidents blame each other for Mexico's economic disaster. They are right.Fidel Castro is checking out France. There's an opening for president there.Maybe God does not want dozens of millions of people to live in California.Michael Jordan can play basketball without strike-breaking against his peers. Also, hanging in mid-air doesn't do much in baseball.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 12, 2013
Looking forward is generally considered a good thing; it comes highly recommended by motivational speakers and driving instructors, and it's the credo of digital-age entrepreneurs, urban planners and serial daters. But if you constantly look forward, you miss the pleasures of the periphery. Take St. Paul Street. Baltimore has a simple north-south, east-west street grid that makes commuting tolerable for the urban driver. But the grid is so good that at times, when the lights are with you, you miss things.
NEWS
February 17, 2008
Jarrettsville bank beginnings go way back On Feb. 22, 1870, the Jarrettsville Building Association met to offer at an auction its first loan of $400. The association was organized in 1869 to promote financial stability after the Civil War. The early directors sought to encourage home ownership and increase saving. The association constructed its own building in 1952 and later changed its name to Jarrettsville Federal Savings and Loan Association. Source: Jarrettsville Past and Present Compiled by the staff of the Harford County Public Library
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | October 15, 1996
If getting through the Sunday bloat of NFL football and the relentless public relations machinery that goes with it is a chore, it's good to know that, at least for half a season, there's TNT, whose Sunday night package provides all the detail of the other NFL carriers, but with an insouciance and charm that no one else delivers.From this perspective, Sunday's Baltimore-Indianapolis game, seen locally on TNT and Channel 54, was easily the best presentation of a Ravens contest seen so far this year.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | May 1, 2007
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- It seems every racetrack is either thriving because it has slots or withering while begging for them. Churchill Downs, the home of Saturday's Kentucky Derby, would seem to be an exception. But at Churchill, past and present officials say that looks - augmented by a recent $125 million overhaul and flattered by a Forbes magazine article that rates the Derby as No. 8 among the sports and event brands in the world - can be deceiving. Kentucky Derby Saturday, 6:04 p.m. post time, Churchill Downs, Louisville, Ky. TV: Chs. 11, 4
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 21, 1996
This is the last weekend to see Diane Samuels' "Kindertransport" at AXIS Theatre. An exploration of identity, the play rides a collision course between past and present. In the past, it concerns a German Jewish family that sends its daughter to England for safety on the eve of Kristallnacht. In the present, it focuses on a young English woman confronting her true heritage.Directed by Brian Klaas, "Kindertransport" features a cast including Carol Cohen, Amanda Brown-Lipitz, Bethany Brown, Mary Alice Feather and Mark Bernier.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
When the U.S. Golf Association conducted its Centennial State Team tournaments in Orlando, Fla., last week, it marked the realization of an idea originated by Edward Johnston some 15 years ago.Johnston, a Towson lawyer and immediate past president of Baltimore Country Club, broached the possibility of such an event to William Campbell, a longtime golfing friend and, at that time, president of the USGA."
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | October 24, 2002
ONE OF the things that was drummed into me as a child was pride in my state. Maryland, with its mountains, bay, ocean, beaches, rivers, low country and rolling countryside, is America in miniature, I was taught. (Well, almost; we have no deserts and no natural lakes.) So it comes as a surprise to see people driving with yellow-orange license plates that have "Our Farms, Our Future" imprinted on them, with a red barn at the bottom. The plates are special order, like the ones with herons and the legend "Treasure the Chesapeake" on them.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 12, 2013
For us aging Vietnam War protesters, the secret domestic surveillance revealed by Edward Snowden, a young former CIA contractor, is like a bad flashback. In 1968, Lyndon Johnson demanded that something be done to curb the demonstrations that were erupting on college campuses. They had begun as anti-war protests but had broadened to include social issues, especially civil rights. The president believed the demonstrations were part of an organized effort to destabilize the government, and the gloves came off. It wasn't until 1974 that Seymour Hersh, reporting for The New York Times, revealed that the CIA had been conducting a massive, illegal domestic intelligence operation against the anti-war movement and other dissident groups.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | November 17, 2012
As the Ravens prepare for Sunday's AFC North showdown against the Pittsburgh Steelers and the latest chapter of what many consider the NFL's best rivalry, The Sun caught up this week with several participants from the series to get some of their memories from past meetings. Not long after he was selected in the first round by the Ravens in 1997, linebacker Peter Boulware starting hearing about a burgeoning rivalry with the Steelers and how much Ravens' fans disliked that team from Pittsburgh.
SPORTS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
Do you believe in ghosts? To live in Baltimore is to live in city haunted by its past. I think it's part of our lingering Southerness — the excessively sweet desserts, the annual freakouts over snow, the Faulknerian thing about the past not even being past. Lord knows how many wallets in town still have Hutzler's cards buried behind the ones for Macy's or the ATM, or how many anniversary-celebrants still try to make reservations at Haussner's. Because nothing, of course, is quite so beloved as something that's no longer around.
NEWS
July 13, 2010
With all the attention given the Gulf of Mexico oil spill and BP's efforts to reimburse those who have been harmed by the pollution, one might think this was the only example of a poorly regulated industry damaging a critical ecosystem in this country. Sadly, it is not. A lawsuit filed last week by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, the Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper and a handful of local residents against the current and previous owners of the Sparrows Point steelmaking facilities reflects a much older problem that has gotten much less attention than what's been happening in the Gulf.
NEWS
February 17, 2008
Jarrettsville bank beginnings go way back On Feb. 22, 1870, the Jarrettsville Building Association met to offer at an auction its first loan of $400. The association was organized in 1869 to promote financial stability after the Civil War. The early directors sought to encourage home ownership and increase saving. The association constructed its own building in 1952 and later changed its name to Jarrettsville Federal Savings and Loan Association. Source: Jarrettsville Past and Present Compiled by the staff of the Harford County Public Library
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | May 1, 2007
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- It seems every racetrack is either thriving because it has slots or withering while begging for them. Churchill Downs, the home of Saturday's Kentucky Derby, would seem to be an exception. But at Churchill, past and present officials say that looks - augmented by a recent $125 million overhaul and flattered by a Forbes magazine article that rates the Derby as No. 8 among the sports and event brands in the world - can be deceiving. Kentucky Derby Saturday, 6:04 p.m. post time, Churchill Downs, Louisville, Ky. TV: Chs. 11, 4
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 23, 1992
NEW YORK -- Every phase of Frank Cashen's life, personal and professional, was represented. A kaleidoscope combining the past and present. A galaxy of family and friends, gathered for no other reason than to engage in a torrent of enjoyment. He only needed to scan the faces in the room and it was as if he had pressed a button to activate his book of memories.Even a cowboy singer, Gene Autry, rode in from the West to bthere and a famous song and dance man, Donald O'Connor, let && it be known how pleased he was to have been included.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | May 9, 1993
Larry Vincent, a clothing store owner who lost a bid four years ago to become mayor of Annapolis, entered the race yesterday, charging that Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins takes credit "for things he has had nothing to do with."Saying he wants to "restore professional government to Annapolis," Mr. Vincent, a Republican, told about 75 supporters at the Rustic Inn Restaurant he wants to make Maryland's capital "the best small city in America."Mr. Vincent's entry sets up a possible three-way race. Dennis M. Callahan, the former mayor who lost to Mr. Hopkins, 67, in a stunning Democratic primary defeat four years ago, is running as an independent.
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