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By MIKE HIMOWITZ and MIKE HIMOWITZ,SUN COLUMNIST | July 13, 2006
One of the benefits of writing a column is that you get to gripe in public. So here's a gripe I've been nursing for months: passwords. I have too many of them. In fact, when I counted mine this week, I came up with 42 logins for Web sites, data services, voice mail and e-mail systems. I can do this easily because, like most folks who have to juggle lots of passwords, I do exactly the wrong thing. I write them down - in a safe place, of course. A bit later, I'll discuss one possible solution to the problem - software that collects your passwords, stores them securely and doles them out when needed.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Moving to the forefront of social media privacy law nationwide, the Maryland General Assembly has passed legislation prohibiting employers in the state from asking current and prospective employees for their user names and passwords to websites such as Facebook and Twitter. If Gov. Martin O'Malley signs the bill — his office said it was one of hundreds of bills it has yet to review — the bill would make Maryland the first state in the nation to set such a restriction into law. Other states are considering similar legislation, including Illinois and California.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 23, 2003
I registered with my credit card company so I could view my transactions online, but I typed in the wrong password and checked the "remember my password" box. Now when I try to get to the credit card information, it is grayed out, and the Web site rejects me. The help desk tells me they accept only passwords that are typed in physically while a customer is logging on, and I can't do that because the password entry box is grayed out. The help-desk people...
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | March 22, 2012
You've been out of a job for awhile and finally land an interview. The interviewer asks you for your Facebook password. Do you swallow your outrage and give it up, hoping there's nothing incriminating? Or, do you refuse, knowing you'll likely not get the job? If proposed Maryland legislation gets passed, you won't have to make that choice. A bill now making its way through the General Assembly would make it illegal for an employer to ask for your user name or password to access your personal accounts.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | March 3, 2005
LIVING IN today's world means slogging your way every day through Password Hell. I have to remember so many passwords, my head's ready to explode. I have three passwords for my computer at work. I have two passwords for my home computer. I have a password for my e-mail. I have a password for my voicemail. I have a password to access my 401(k) online. Look, I need two passwords just to make a tee time to play golf. Have you ever played golf? Golf will kill you. Golf is the most stressful game you could ever play.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2003
The online bank account. The e-mail inbox. The frequent-flier account. The Internet retailer who sells those hard-to-find exercise tapes. All of these Web sites - and thousands more - require passwords. And that's in addition to all the other user names, codes and personal identification numbers people need to log on to computers at work, withdraw cash from an automated teller machine, check their voice mail and disarm a home security system. With concerns about security on the Internet and on workplace computer networks reaching new heights, passwords are proliferating to the point that they threaten to overwhelm the original computer - the human brain.
BUSINESS
By Tim Barker and Tim Barker,St. Louis Post-Dispatch | August 3, 2008
ST. LOUIS - In the world of passwords, there's a right way and a wrong way to protect yourself. Cliff Gaines of University City, Mo., has lived on both sides of the line. A decade ago, he was a poster child for how to do it wrong. His passwords were complicated enough. But he was committing a cardinal sin in the eyes of security evangelists: He was writing them down. Those are five words that make most experts cringe. How, they ask, do you expect to keep yourself - or your employer - safe from identity theft and computer fraud if you leave the keys to your life scribbled on a piece of paper?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer 8. Lee and Jennifer 8. Lee,New York Times News Service | January 6, 2002
The instructions are clear: Passwords are personal. Don't share them with friends. Don't leave them lying around. Change them often. In other words, treat passwords as if they were underwear. Unfortunately, few people listen. Passwords are supposed to be disposable and discreet. But instead people become sentimentally attached to them or leave them taped underneath their keyboards or on their monitors, to the dismay of computer-security professionals worldwide. Even those who are vigilant about guarding passwords may reveal more than they think.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Kennedy and Michael Kennedy,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 2002
Face it. Almost everyone suffers from a bad case of passworditis. Think, for a moment, of the slew of daily chores that require passwords. The company computer. The home computer. ATMs. Web sites. Voice mail. Car and home security systems. It doesn't take long to accumulate a dozen or more passwords. Scribbling them down on Post-its or using the same password for everything is how most people cope with the overload. Either way makes it easier for hackers to invade computer privacy. Now researchers are moving toward what may be an answer to the password conundrum - pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2002
For years, government agencies and private companies have turned to science fiction- inspired technology to protect their most precious secrets. Today, home PC users have access to the same kind of high-tech protection for their notebook and desktop computers. For about $100, people who want to keep personal information personal or more easily manage passwords on multiple Web sites can get help at the touch of a finger - or more precisely, a fingerprint. Several manufacturers offer fingerprint readers that guard access to computers.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | March 22, 2012
Let me play devil's advocate for a moment: If I were a boss, I'd ask for your Facebook password. You may think what you do is personal and private on Facebook. But how much is really personal and private when you're posting pictures and sharing stuff with hundreds of your friends? An email to one or a handful of people may be considered private, but if you're sharing with, say 500 friends, that's different. Imagine you're in an auditorium with a large projector, and you're telling 500 people in that auditorium about your weekend, and posting pictures, and saying things that affect your reputation and possibly your employer's reputation.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2011
State prison officials say they will no longer demand that job applicants provide passwords to social media accounts. Candidates will be asked for access but have the option of refusing, according to the prison agency. The announcement Wednesday by the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services was a response to a complaint filed with the American Civil Liberties Union by a corrections job applicant, who said he was offended and troubled by a prison official's request for his Facebook password.
NEWS
February 26, 2011
When a person applies for a promotion or a new job, the interviewer is not allowed to ask about their political affiliation or religion. They can't tell the applicant they want to read their mail. So why is there any doubt that employers shouldn't be allowed to force an applicant to give them access to his or her Facebook page, blog or email? Any of these social media sites could easily contain information that, in any other setting, would be protected by privacy laws. We need to move away from the mindset that electronic communications are somehow different from more traditional forms of communication.
BUSINESS
By Tim Barker and Tim Barker,St. Louis Post-Dispatch | August 3, 2008
ST. LOUIS - In the world of passwords, there's a right way and a wrong way to protect yourself. Cliff Gaines of University City, Mo., has lived on both sides of the line. A decade ago, he was a poster child for how to do it wrong. His passwords were complicated enough. But he was committing a cardinal sin in the eyes of security evangelists: He was writing them down. Those are five words that make most experts cringe. How, they ask, do you expect to keep yourself - or your employer - safe from identity theft and computer fraud if you leave the keys to your life scribbled on a piece of paper?
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 9, 2008
Have you come down with it yet? Are you afflicted? I've sure got it, and I've had it a while now. I've got a bad case of "password overload." Is there something for which we don't need passwords? About a year or two ago, my daughter dragged me kicking and screaming into the 21st century by selling me a computer. (For those of you thinking that, as my daughter, she should have just given me the thing, consider this: As I lie fading away on my deathbed, I plan to sell her my Order Sons of Italy watch.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | August 31, 2007
A Maryland Department of the Environment laptop computer stolen from an employee's car last weekend held personal information, including Social Security numbers, for 10,000 residents registered with one of four state boards. The car was recovered, but not the laptop, said Robert Ballinger, deputy director of communications for the department. Ballinger said all 10,000 people identified in the database have been notified via mail. The computer included names, addresses and phone numbers of members of the boards of well drillers, environmental sanitarians, waterworks and septic inspectors.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2002
The problem with remembering passwords is that they have to be exactly right. But studies show humans are not very good at precisely recalling things. What they are adept at is recognizing something they have already seen. In particular, humans have a strong ability to recognize images. So a team of graduate students at the University of California at Berkeley is working on a project called Deja Vu, which asks users to base their passwords on computer-generated abstract art. A user picks out a personal portfolio of five colorful images.
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 13, 2005
The identity thieves who stole passwords to tap personal data from information broker LexisNexis hacked the records of more than 300,000 Americans, 10 times what the company first acknowledged, the company disclosed yesterday. The announcement by London-based Reed Elsevier, which owns LexisNexis, indicates that security problems in the industry are more widespread than first thought. The company said that it had uncovered 59 cases in which unauthorized persons "using IDs and passwords of legitimate customers" fraudulently acquired personal identifying data from its databases.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun Reporter | April 4, 2007
At Thurgood Marshall High, where reading scores are routinely low, an ambitious group of mostly sophomores and juniors are in a club they say grows more exclusive and popular every day. To hear members of the school's all-male book club tell it, Thurgood Marshall's library - home to meetings that take place every two months - is the place to be seen. "The girls in the school are upset," said junior Derrell Brown. "They want to know why they can't get copies of the books we read." Brown, 18, is an original member of the two-year-old club, which school administrators and organizers say has increased interest in reading throughout the school.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ and MIKE HIMOWITZ,SUN COLUMNIST | July 20, 2006
From the volume and tone of the e-mail this week, a lot of you agreed with last week's rant about passwords - we all have too many to manage. What I didn't expect was the number of suggestions readers offered for dealing with multiple logins. With thanks to everyone who responded, I'll pass these on: In addition to the programs I tried out (RoboForm and Password Safe), several readers recommended a free, no-frills password manager called KeePass. Like Password Safe, this is an open source project, which means it's developed and tested by a community of programmers and well-tested by hackers.
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