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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 17, 1999
BERLIN -- Under fierce attack by political conservatives, the German government backed away yesterday from a bold plan to invite millions of foreigners to become German citizens.Instead, the government of Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder approved a watered-down version of its plan to rewrite Germany's 1913 citizenship law, which defines Germans by bloodlines rather than by residence.Under the proposal -- which is expected to be approved in parliament by May -- foreigners may apply for citizenship after living in Germany for eight years instead of the 15 required by law. Most children born in Germany will for the first time become German citizens automatically, regardless of their heritage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Four restaurants in the Mount Vernon and Mid-Town Belvedere neighborhoods are partnering up for a hamburger discount program. The Mount Vernon Burger Passport costs $32 but is worth more than $70 of burgers and draft beer, according to its promoters. The passport, which went on sale last Monday, must be redeemed by May 15. The participating restaurants are the Owl Bar at the Belvedere, City Cafe , Turp's and Dooby's . The passport, which can be purchased on Eventbrite , or in person at Dooby's, can be redeemed once at each restaurant.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge are warning that a deadline that requires 27 industrialized countries to issue their citizens computer-coded passports to travel to the United States could threaten the U.S. travel industry. The countries - 22 European nations, Japan, Brunei, Australia, New Zealand and Singapore - have to begin providing passports with technology that recognizes travelers' faces by Oct. 26. Congress imposed the deadline after the Sept.
SPORTS
May 9, 2013
A players-only meeting, some serious offensive tinkering and the emergence of midfielders Brian Hess (McDonogh), Pat Corbett and Alex Drake has led Lehigh to a 12-4 finish. It's placed them in a position to do what they failed to do last year — win the first NCAA tournament game in program history. "The seniors met; then we had a team meeting. I always knew we had the talent and the guys on the field capable of getting the job done. Guys had to believe in themselves. We needed to call guys out and we needed more out of guys; we've done that," attackman David DiMaria said of the team meeting after Lehigh's 6-4 loss to Massachusetts on March 20. "We thought we arrived last year, and the plan was to remain," coach Kevin Cassese said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 24, 2003
WASHINGTON - Partly because of security concerns after the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, technologies that identify people by their faces, fingerprints and other body parts will become a standard part of international travel and appear on passports and visas within the next few years, officials say. Travel documents will soon include computer chips and bar codes that contain body identification information. The changes are being made to meet guidelines set over the past few months by international organizations.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 31, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A half-dozen Americans missed a papal audience at the Vatican. Tearful newlyweds had to pass up their honeymoons in Europe. And Brazilian soccer players weren't able to play a game in Pensacola, Fla.They were some of the hundreds of thousands of travelers who have been unable to obtain passports or visas because of the U.S. government's shutdown for lack of a new budget.The offices that issue passports here and provide visas abroad have been closed, or are barred by law from performing their duties, since the money for their operation has not been appropriated.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 21, 2003
LONDON - More than 150 police raided a North London mosque yesterday and confiscated a form of tear gas, passports and credit cards in a terrorism-related sweep that comes amid heightened fears of an attack on the British capital. The mosque has long been in the spotlight because one of its clerics has made a series of statements praising al-Qaida, Osama bin Laden and the Sept. 11 attacks on the United States. Richard Reid, a Briton arrested after he tried to ignite explosives in a shoe during a trans-Atlantic flight, and Zacarias Moussaoui, who is suspected of involvement in the Sept.
NEWS
By Frank James and Frank James,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 15, 2004
WASHINGTON - In the near future, Americans returning from abroad will have their faces scanned by cameras at ports of entry, then compared by computer to digitized photos encoded on high-tech chips in their passports for verification. The goal is to prevent known terrorists from entering the country and to make the use of stolen passports virtually impossible. Because such biometric identification incorporates a person's unique physical characteristics, including fingerprint swirls or iris patterns, it is considered the best method yet invented of authenticating someone's identity.
FEATURES
By Claudia Kolker and Claudia Kolker,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | January 18, 1998
World affairs have changed since Donna Walker launched her business 10 years ago.But fictitious passports, she says, never go out of style.International Documents Service, Walker's one-woman Houston firm, creates passports from extinct countries. Covered in institutional burgundy, flecked with stamps and seals, the phony documents cost about $215 and look real.She claims she sells 400 of her "camouflage" passports every year. The idea, she says, is to protect travelers in hostile situations.
NEWS
By Thomas Frank and Thomas Frank,NEWSDAY | November 26, 2004
WASHINGTON - An effort to improve the security of passports is facing delays by European countries that say they cannot meet a deadline the United States imposed shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks. Jonathan Faull, director general of the European Commission, said this week that member countries probably would not be ready to begin issuing passports with biometric identifiers by October, as U.S. law requires. Congress mandated a biometric identifier such as a fingerprint on new passports issued by most European countries and other stable democracies such as New Zealand.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | May 8, 2013
A Roland Park resident has created a "passport" to Druid Hill Park. Janet Felsten, founder and director of the nonprofit group Baltimore Green Map, introduced the green-colored passport April 19 at a Baltimore Green Week kickoff party in the conservatory. Felsten said she created the 20-page, passport-shaped booklet on cover stock paper as a companion to a detailed map of Druid Hill Park that she made in 2010. The purpose of the map and the new passport is partly to point out places of interest in the 745-acre park, which is home to the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, Druid Lake and the Howard Peters Rawlings Conservatory and Botanic Gardens, among other attractions.
NEWS
January 1, 2013
We read about famous people like French film star Gerard Depardieu, who moved to Belgium to avoid a 75 percent income tax on millionaires proposed by France's Socialist government (a measure rejected last week by a French council, though French leadership has vowed to resubmit a similar proposal). Then there is Eduardo Saverin, who took the extreme step of giving up his U.S. citizenship and could see a savings of $39 million on his Facebook investment, according to the research firm Wealth-X.
TRAVEL
May 12, 2011
Cultural Tourism's'Passport DC 2011' What: A monthlong celebration of international culture that offers a global journey through Washington, including street festivals, open houses, performances and access to a number of embassies. The highlight of the event is typically the Around the World Embassy Tour, which takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and features tours of more than 30 embassies representing six continents. The tour is free and shuttle buses will be provided.
TRAVEL
By MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN | May 31, 2009
As you read this today, I'm floating in the Atlantic on a cruise ship bound for the Caribbean. Yes, I know. The life of a travel editor is, like, so exhausting. But I'll have you know it's my first vacation in nearly six months, so I'd like to think I've earned it. In preparing for my trip, I was reminded of the new passport rules that go into effect June 1. As of that date, most Americans will need to show a passport or passport card to enter the U.S. by land or sea. Airline passengers already have to show such identification.
TRAVEL
By Jane Engle and Jane Engle,Los Angeles Times | February 22, 2009
If you're traveling outside the U.S. this year, here are two pieces of advice: Get or renew your passport now, and think twice before planning a car trip to Mexico or Canada in June. That's when we may see the biggest change ever for Western Hemisphere travel. Starting June 1, Americans will need to show a passport, a passport card or other document to return to the U.S. by land or sea from Mexico and Canada. Despite assurances from agencies involved, there may be glitches and delays.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | July 27, 2008
When it comes to consumer complaints, blame flies fast and furious. Companies blame faulty technology or confused workers. Workers blame bad company policies and, occasionally, unreasonable consumers with unrealistic expectations. And consumers blame everyone involved - from an employee on up to corporate management and the governmental body that regulates the company. Seldom does anyone blame himself. Joelle Miller, a graduate student, wrote in recently about a colossally bad experience she had while flying from Washington to Johannesburg, South Africa, on June 3. Here's her story: "The U.S. State Department issued me a passport with a typo."
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2005
When Kevin Mitchell sends his son overseas this summer on a school trip, he plans to send him off with a ball cap from a Canadian sports team he's never watched play - a thin disguise he believes will offer protection from thieves and terrorists who target Americans. But Mitchell, head of the Business Travel Coalition, an advocacy group, said that may not be enough on the next trip. Travel groups like his, among others, oppose a State Department plan to embed small computer chips in passports.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 14, 2004
MADRID, Spain - Authorities arrested three Moroccans and two Spaniards with Indian passports in the capital yesterday in connection with train bombings that killed 200 people, and the country's interior minister said early today that a videotape claiming al-Qaida responsibility for the attack had been found. The interior minister, Angel Acebes, said he could not confirm the authenticity of the videotape and said investigators have not determined whether those arrested were tied to al-Qaida.
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | June 15, 2008
Royal Caribbean is telling us that passports are needed for a cruise to Ensenada, Mexico, but I've been reading the papers and I know that's not true. Passports are so expensive. Can you look into this? You are correct: U.S. citizens won't need a passport to cruise or drive into Mexico or Canada until June 1, 2009. On the other hand, we don't want to see you and your family left on the dock in San Pedro this summer while an overzealous Royal Caribbean sails off without you. So we checked with headquarters.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun Reporter | May 11, 2008
Don't take a hammer to your new U.S. passport. And don't drill a hole in that credit card or zap it in the microwave. Experts say these measures - recommended on some extreme Web sites as ways to safeguard privacy and security - are unecessary for people concerned about the growing prevelance of Radio Frequency Identification tags. The tiny silicon chips are embedded in credit cards, passports and other everyday items and can transmit data on where you go, what you buy and even who you are. The devices include "smart" car keys, the no-swipe credit card on your key ring, the E-ZPass transponder on your windshield, the prescription bottle in your medicine cabinet, the blouse you buy at the mall and even the soles of your shoes.
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