Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPassive Smoking
IN THE NEWS

Passive Smoking

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Boston Globe | October 7, 1992
BOSTON -- Researchers at the Harvard University School of Public Health are reporting today the first evidence that tobacco smoke in the environment creates potentially precancerous changes in the lungs of non-smokers.While previous studies have found an increased risk of lung cancer among non-smokers who lived with smokers, the new report is the first to find actual damage in the lungs of passive smokers and strengthens the causal link.The study, published in today's Journal of the American Medical Association, relied on autopsy examinations of women who had died from causes not related to smoking or respiratory diseases.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR, JOHN FRITZE AND STEPHANIE BEASLEY and JONATHAN BOR, JOHN FRITZE AND STEPHANIE BEASLEY,SUN REPORTERS | June 28, 2006
As states and localities debate smoking bans, U.S. Surgeon General Richard H. Carmona declared yesterday that secondhand smoke triggers diseases that include lung cancer and sudden infant death syndrome -- and that no level is safe. "Science has proven that there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke," Carmona said at a Washington news conference, summing up a 709-page report that is the surgeon general's office's first assessment of the risks in two decades. While former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop said in 1986 that exposure to other people's tobacco smoke can trigger lung cancer, Carmona added several other diseases.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | January 26, 1993
Q: My wife keeps nagging me about smoking in the house. She says it is my decision whether to kill myself by smoking cigarettes, but smoking in the house endangers her and our children. Is she right?A: Experts now generally agree that significant health risks are associated with second-hand or passive smoking, that is, inhaling other people's tobacco smoke.Recent estimates suggest that passive smoking is responsible for about 50,000 deaths annually among American non-smokers.Passive smoking has recently been ranked right behind active smoking and alcohol as the third leading cause of preventable death in this country.
NEWS
By George F. Will | February 15, 1998
WASHINGTON -- People commenting on, and concocting plans for spending the proceeds from, the tobacco settlement often neglect to mention that there is no settlement.But, then, there is no reason anything should be reasonable about a tobacco policy that rests on the peculiar premise that government is a victim of smokers. Or of tobacco companies. Or something.The latest wrinkle in this farcical melee is the little matter of the lawyers' big fees. But begin with the root irrationality of policy toward the tobacco industry.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 20, 1997
Secondhand cigarette smoke is more dangerous than previously thought, Harvard researchers reported yesterday in a study with broad implications for public health policy and probable impact on at least one major lawsuit.The 10-year study, which tracked more than 32,000 healthy women who never smoked, has found that regular exposure to smoking by other people smoking at home or work almost doubled the risk of heart disease.Earlier studies have linked secondhand smoke to heart disease, but the new findings show the biggest increase in risk ever reported, and the researchers say it applies equally to men and women.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | January 13, 1991
Danville, Virginia--AT 6.50 A.M., I walked into the hospital cafeteria. Sliding my tray past the scrambled eggs, bacon, biscuits and doughnuts, I picked up a glass of orange juice, a box of bran cereal and a container of skim milk, and settled in to read the morning paper with my breakfast.As soon as my seat hit the chair, I noticed something and looked up. There at the next table were two women in hospital uniform, both smoking cigarettes. I looked behind me. There were four women at another table, three of them smoking cigarettes.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 28, 1993
LONDON -- A nonsmoking information officer has become the first British citizen to be awarded compensation for damages to her health from the effects of passive smoking at her workplace.Although the damages to Veronica Bland totaled only about $23,000, several experts predicted that her case would open the floodgates to a mass of similar lawsuits that could run into millions of dollars.Ms. Bland, 36, contended she suffered chronic bronchitis because workers near her at the Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council in northwest England smoked some 150 cigarettes a day."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | June 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The cigarette industry, reeling from a fast-spreading campaign to ban smoking in public places, fought back yesterday by asking a federal judge to erase the government's conclusion that secondhand smoke causes cancer in nonsmokers.In an unusual legal claim, the industry demanded that the Environmental Protection Agency be ordered to take back what it said in January when it found that other people's cigarette smoke is so poisonous that there is no safe level of exposure to it.The EPA's conclusion, according to the lawsuit filed in Greensboro, N.C., is being translated all across the country into tight new restrictions on smoking, including a ban on it in 40,000 post office buildings.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 18, 1997
TOKYO -- For the first time ever, the Japanese government is expected this summer to acknowledge formally that smoking is a direct cause of illness.The Ministry of Health has published such warnings under its own authority in the past. However, its views on the dangers of cigarettes have never been ratified by the Cabinet as official policy in a land where 58 percent of men and 14 percent of women are smokers.Japanese anti-smoking activists say that is because of opposition within the government from the mighty Ministry of Finance, which collects $16 billion in revenue each year from cigarette sales and has traditionally shunned stiff regulation of the tobacco industry.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | February 4, 1993
LONDON -- The British are usually receptive to styles in film, fashion and art and to social trends that make their way across from the United States. But they are tenaciously resistant to American food and health fads. For the most part.For instance, one could easily get the impression that cholesterol has yet to be found in British veins and arteries. It is rarely described as a threat. Foods that might be without it are scrupulously avoided. Sandwiches in pubs and restaurants are spread with plenty of butter.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 20, 1997
Secondhand cigarette smoke is more dangerous than previously thought, Harvard researchers reported yesterday in a study with broad implications for public health policy and probable impact on at least one major lawsuit.The 10-year study, which tracked more than 32,000 healthy women who never smoked, has found that regular exposure to smoking by other people smoking at home or work almost doubled the risk of heart disease.Earlier studies have linked secondhand smoke to heart disease, but the new findings show the biggest increase in risk ever reported, and the researchers say it applies equally to men and women.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 18, 1997
TOKYO -- For the first time ever, the Japanese government is expected this summer to acknowledge formally that smoking is a direct cause of illness.The Ministry of Health has published such warnings under its own authority in the past. However, its views on the dangers of cigarettes have never been ratified by the Cabinet as official policy in a land where 58 percent of men and 14 percent of women are smokers.Japanese anti-smoking activists say that is because of opposition within the government from the mighty Ministry of Finance, which collects $16 billion in revenue each year from cigarette sales and has traditionally shunned stiff regulation of the tobacco industry.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | June 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The cigarette industry, reeling from a fast-spreading campaign to ban smoking in public places, fought back yesterday by asking a federal judge to erase the government's conclusion that secondhand smoke causes cancer in nonsmokers.In an unusual legal claim, the industry demanded that the Environmental Protection Agency be ordered to take back what it said in January when it found that other people's cigarette smoke is so poisonous that there is no safe level of exposure to it.The EPA's conclusion, according to the lawsuit filed in Greensboro, N.C., is being translated all across the country into tight new restrictions on smoking, including a ban on it in 40,000 post office buildings.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | February 4, 1993
LONDON -- The British are usually receptive to styles in film, fashion and art and to social trends that make their way across from the United States. But they are tenaciously resistant to American food and health fads. For the most part.For instance, one could easily get the impression that cholesterol has yet to be found in British veins and arteries. It is rarely described as a threat. Foods that might be without it are scrupulously avoided. Sandwiches in pubs and restaurants are spread with plenty of butter.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 28, 1993
LONDON -- A nonsmoking information officer has become the first British citizen to be awarded compensation for damages to her health from the effects of passive smoking at her workplace.Although the damages to Veronica Bland totaled only about $23,000, several experts predicted that her case would open the floodgates to a mass of similar lawsuits that could run into millions of dollars.Ms. Bland, 36, contended she suffered chronic bronchitis because workers near her at the Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council in northwest England smoked some 150 cigarettes a day."
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | January 26, 1993
Q: My wife keeps nagging me about smoking in the house. She says it is my decision whether to kill myself by smoking cigarettes, but smoking in the house endangers her and our children. Is she right?A: Experts now generally agree that significant health risks are associated with second-hand or passive smoking, that is, inhaling other people's tobacco smoke.Recent estimates suggest that passive smoking is responsible for about 50,000 deaths annually among American non-smokers.Passive smoking has recently been ranked right behind active smoking and alcohol as the third leading cause of preventable death in this country.
NEWS
By Jim Fain | April 15, 1991
IT'S NOT so much Big Brother as Aunt Hortense who's running things these days. The government isn't yet into thought control (though if it keeps meddling in hygiene and deportment, it may get there). Right now it's obsessed instead with how much cholesterol we swallow and how many tons of saccharin it takes to kill a mouse.As one of millions dutifully chomping high-fiber sawdust hull-deep in skim milk, I begin each day in the deep melancholy the palate transmits to the central nervous system when it's terminally bored.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR, JOHN FRITZE AND STEPHANIE BEASLEY and JONATHAN BOR, JOHN FRITZE AND STEPHANIE BEASLEY,SUN REPORTERS | June 28, 2006
As states and localities debate smoking bans, U.S. Surgeon General Richard H. Carmona declared yesterday that secondhand smoke triggers diseases that include lung cancer and sudden infant death syndrome -- and that no level is safe. "Science has proven that there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke," Carmona said at a Washington news conference, summing up a 709-page report that is the surgeon general's office's first assessment of the risks in two decades. While former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop said in 1986 that exposure to other people's tobacco smoke can trigger lung cancer, Carmona added several other diseases.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | January 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A chain reaction of legal challenges aimed at factories, offices, restaurants and other public places seems certain to be set off by a new government study finding that cigarette smoke is deadly to nonsmokers -- and especially to children.A spate of lawsuits and a fight over a tangled web of proposed federal rules, reaching deeply into Americans' daily lives, are almost predictable consequences of the Environmental Protection Agency's first-time ruling yesterday that "passive smoke" causes cancer in people who do not smoke and is the likely cause of a whole host of other health problems for nonsmokers.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | October 7, 1992
BOSTON -- Researchers at the Harvard University School of Public Health are reporting today the first evidence that tobacco smoke in the environment creates potentially precancerous changes in the lungs of non-smokers.While previous studies have found an increased risk of lung cancer among non-smokers who lived with smokers, the new report is the first to find actual damage in the lungs of passive smokers and strengthens the causal link.The study, published in today's Journal of the American Medical Association, relied on autopsy examinations of women who had died from causes not related to smoking or respiratory diseases.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.