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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
The Scientific American blog network has a juicy looking collection of posts up on the subject of food and eating. The round-up is called Passions of Food . I have to admit, I love this stuff, especially the articles by anthropologists. Some of the posts were produced freshly for this round-up; others, like Bora Zivkovic's Do you love or Hate or Cilantro? , are from the archives, I've barely cracked the spine, but I'm looking forward to Krytal D'Costa on the culture of  coffee drinkers and Christie Wilcox on the myths of organic farming . Bt right now, though, I'm going to read D'Costa's Are We Ashamed of Lunch?
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NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Mountain biking has had a big influence on Nick Griesser, and his passion motivates him to make others aware of the sport. The Glenelg resident has been biking since he was 10 years old and says he intends to continue mountain biking and "dirt jumping" for the rest of his life. "I think people don't understand how big of an impact mountain biking can have on a community," he said. "If someone like me wasn't interested in team sports and likes to be on their own - it's nice to have.
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NEWS
April 2, 2012
First and most important, it is a tragedy when any young person dies before his or her time. What is rather disheartening is that politicians like the president and members of Congress, groups like the NAACP and TV personalities like Al Sharpton are stoking the fires for a very dangerous response from people who know no other way to get justice then through violence. Just look at all of the retaliation done on the streets of any city in America on any given weekend. If any innocent person dies as a result of their irresponsible response to this incident, they should be held accountable in a public forum.
NEWS
July 28, 2014
We take the Baltimore County Police Department at its word that its officers were just trying to give some helpful tips to a pair of Dundalk activists about the rules of decorum at County Council work sessions and not trying to intimidate them into silence about their opposition to County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's proposed redevelopment of a government building in the community. Even if the meeting earlier this month between three officers and a pair of community activists really was intended as a "polite and friendly way to discuss concerns about protocols," as the police department's spokeswoman put it, the whole business still stinks, which Chief Jim Johnson correctly concluded after reviewing the incident.
ENTERTAINMENT
By G.W. Hawkes and G.W. Hawkes,Special to the Sun | April 30, 2000
"Wild Decembers," by Edna O'Brien. Houghton Mifflin. 259 pages. $24. Literature ought to offer surprises, and Edna O'Brien's third book in a trilogy, "Wild Decembers," does that with both hands. "Wild Decembers" is a battle for ownership -- of land, of birthrights, of a man's or woman's heart -- and will appeal to those who like their human stories with a deep-bellied pipe organ groaning the rafters. This novel doesn't take half-steps -- characters who are stubborn are magnificently, idiotically stubborn; characters who are killers will kill anything; characters who are shy are shy like lemurs.
NEWS
By Pamela Woolford and Pamela Woolford,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 22, 2000
JUST ABOUT EVERY two weeks for the past 10 years, Peter Fort has driven to the Mount Hope Center in Baltimore to give blood. He has donated blood and blood cells more than 280 times since 1975. Fort, an Owen Brown resident, is a man with three passions: "I am passionate about blood donation, passionate about biking and passionate about my family," he said. Next week, Fort will combine two of his passions by beginning a seven-week bike ride to raise awareness of blood, organ and bone-marrow donation.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | December 22, 1996
IF WE'RE SNOWED IN this Christmas like last year, I won't worry.I'll just snuggle up in the den with our opera recordings and while away winter's solitude with Verdi and Puccini, Donizetti and Mozart.You may laugh, and if you've never tried it, I can't say I blame you.For years, I scrupulously avoided the impressive boxed sets of opera CDs lined up on record store shelves -- mostly, I suspect, because I felt intimidated by the language barrier posed by music composed to foreign words.And to be honest, opera still has a big image problem in this country, notwithstanding the amazing popularity of Pavarotti, Kathleen Battle and other vocal superstars.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1995
Imagine the scandal if William Jefferson Clinton's account books were to reveal that he had spent thousands of dollars to stock the White House cellars with more than 20,000 bottles of the world's finest imported wines.But as Baltimore author James M. Gabler notes in his new book, that is precisely what Thomas Jefferson did during his two terms in office. It didn't seem to hurt his performance too much. And, of course, he used his own money.Mr. Gabler's book, "Passions: The Wines and Travels of Thomas Jefferson" (Bacchus Press, 1995, $29.95)
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | June 5, 2006
In a fictional town of Harmony, Fancy Crane is the hottest new fashion designer on the NBC soap opera Passions. All the rich and stylish people in Fancy's world would just kill for her clothes. But network officials are hoping that fans of the daytime drama will spend real dollars on Fancy Crane's flirty collection, which they started selling earlier this year. It's the first time a soap opera has launched a clothing line, Passions executives say. And some marketing experts are wondering why no one has thought of the idea before.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The food critic of the London Daily Telegraph is in town, where he noted the desolation of a city that clears out over the Thanksgiving holiday and ate perhaps the best restaurant meal of his life at the famed Inn at Little Washington in Virginia. Oh, and he also put the final touches on a new Broadway-bound musical.It's not your imagination -- Andrew Lloyd Webber truly is everywhere. If not Broadway -- where his seemingly indefatigable musicals "Cats," "Phantom of the Opera" and "Sunset Boulevard" are still playing, then his native London, where a new version of "Jesus Christ Superstar" has opened.
SPORTS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
They came to Power Plant Live! with American flags slung like capes around their necks, red-white-and-blue suspenders holding up their shorts and giant top hats festooned with enormous glittering stars that would make Uncle Sam blush. Fifteen minutes before the United States' World Cup match against Portugal, Bruce Springsteen's "Born in the U.S.A. " filled the downtown air. Ten minutes till the start, and the U.S. soccer chant, "I believe that we will win," reached a roar. A DJ whipped the crowd into bellowing "USA" with a few anxious minutes remaining.
NEWS
By Shelley Silwick, For The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
The Maryland SPCA hosted an art show and open house June 8 at its "Project Adopt" satellite adoption center at the White Marsh Mall. A collection of artwork entitled "Kindness" was created by seventh-grade students at Perry Hall Middle School. Depicting dogs and cats who were at the Maryland Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the portraits are displayed throughout the store to raise awareness and help homeless pets in the community. The animal paintings are available for sale for the next few weekends and proceeds from the name-your-donation art sale will be donated to the MD SPCA.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Del. Jon S. Cardin and state Sen. Brian E. Frosh briefly shook hands Monday night. But that's where the niceties ended. In front of a packed audience at the University of Baltimore School of Law, the leading candidates for the Democratic party's nomination for attorney general got downright hostile. Frosh, of Montgomery County, accused Cardin of missing a large number votes in the General Assembly and associating with a rapper facing human trafficking charges. Cardin, of Baltimore County, accused Frosh of working against anti-child predator legislation and trying to implement an "Orwellian" bail system in which a computer decides a prisoner's freedom.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Latinos have for years made up one of the largest and fastest-growing groups in the country. They have also long been one of the most underrepresented minority groups in the federal workplace. Now a new effort is underway - at the highest level of federal hiring - to address that disparity. "There is tremendous growth, as you know, in the Latino community, and we see more and more young people graduating from university, and I really want to tap into those numbers," said Katherine Archuleta, the director of the federal Office of Personnel Management.
BUSINESS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
When Joe Marsala was a kid in Texas, an excitable neighbor would call him over regularly to see a special new plant she had found. After a career as a computer scientist and a mathematician, primarily for the Department of Defense, the Lothian retiree can correct his neighbor. "All plants are pretty special," the master gardener said. Carol Youmans was working in an Annapolis framing store when someone from a local theater group came in to get a poster framed. What were the requirements to work at the Colonial Players, the former teacher asked idly.
NEWS
By Allison Eatough | April 30, 2014
For years, the Bard family has biked everywhere from libraries and farmer's markets to friends' homes and downtown Columbia events. Luda, Aaron and their children - Ammi, 3, Ari, 7, and Ellie, 9 - love traveling via bike, but the snacks available at most venues they bike to are limited, especially when two of their three children have food allergies, Luda Bard said. So they bring their own healthy food along for the ride. "At the summer concerts at the [Columbia] lakefront, the only food there was the ice cream truck," she said.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1999
In the old days, it used to go like this: Mom watched soap opera. Kid got home from school. Kid sat down and watched soap opera with mom. Kid grew attached to soap opera. Kid continued watching soap opera into adulthood, and passed the addiction on to the next generation. Soap characters like Luke and Laura from "General Hospital" and Roman and Marlena from "Days of Our Lives" became as familiar to kids as their friends at school -- extramarital affairs, demonic possession and diabolical twins notwithstanding.
NEWS
August 7, 2002
Joshua Ryan Evans, 20, the 3-foot-2 actor who played Timmy the living doll on the NBC soap Passions, died in San Diego during a medical procedure Monday -- the same day that his character died on the show, the network said yesterday. Mr. Evans was born with a rare disease that stunted his growth, NBC publicist Lauren Townsend said. The cause of death and the nature of the medical procedure were not immediately disclosed. On Monday's episode of Passions, taped last month, Mr. Evans' character died.
NEWS
By Joelle Babula | April 10, 2014
Thank you, Lady Terps , for bringing me back to the game. I've been gone a long time. Eighteen years, in fact, and I never thought I'd be back. I let my last jump-shot fly off my fingertips back in 1996. And I haven't touched a basketball since. I don't recall whether that final shot swished, bricked, toilet-bowled or something in between. I don't recall whether I managed to block a few shots (likely, given my monkey arms), how many times coach bellowed at me to box out (many, I am certain)
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Professor James Gates delivers his big ideas in analogies and metaphors. Setting lax standards for schoolchildren in science classes is like teaching them to dunk a basketball on a 9-foot-high hoop, when kids the next town over play with one 10 feet high, the state school board member says. Without diversity of thought and perspective among collaborating scientists, you get nothing but classical music, the physicist argues. "When you let different people create different music, you get things like rock 'n' roll, jazz," Gates said.
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