Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPassenger Train
IN THE NEWS

Passenger Train

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 17, 2013
An Amtrak train stalled in the Joppatowne area after a mechanical issue Wednesday, and more than 100 passengers were transferred after being stranded for about an hour in 90-degree heat without air-conditioning. When local a emergency crew arrived on the scene shortly after the malfunction was reported, they were baffled to find no one aboard the train. The mechanical problem was reported on Train 91, bound for Miami from New York, between 1:30 p.m. and 1:50 p.m., Amtrak spokeswoman Christina Leeds said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
New technology that could stop or slow a train before an accident - reducing the likelihood of operator errors becoming deadly - will be installed on all MARC trains. The Maryland Board of Public Works approved a $13 million contract on Wednesday to begin installing "positive train control" equipment, which uses GPS and radio signaling to react automatically if a collision or derailment is anticipated. Such a system might have prevented the December derailment of a New York passenger train that came off the tracks as it sped too fast into a turn, killing four and injuring more than 70. It would have prevented the 1996 collision between a MARC train and an Amtrak train in Silver Spring that killed 11 people, according to the National Transportation Safety Board, which investigates all major rail accidents.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2012
Last summer, when the paving trucks showed up, fans of the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad deservedly got a little nervous. The object of their veneration is a sliver of railroad track that bisects North Charles Street in the Woodbrook neighborhood of Baltimore County. Thousands of drivers who pass over the track every day probably have no idea what it was and where it went. It is left over from the days when the Ma & Pa zigzagged for 77.2 miles across the Maryland countryside from Baltimore to York, Pa. That track, which was left unpaved, is where a head-on collision shattered the tranquillity of a late-spring Saturday afternoon.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | November 22, 2013
A train derailment this week near Pennsylvania Station showed me how confused we are about the Baltimore and Potomac Tunnel, where the mishap occurred. This 1873 work of engineering burrows under West Baltimore neighborhoods for 1.4 miles, but its role in local transportation remains little known. I winced when a radio news reader described its location as "south of Baltimore. " Though many assessments say that this 140-year-old engineering relic needs to be replaced, it has not happened.
NEWS
February 7, 1992
An Amtrak secretary was struck and killed by a train yesterday at Pennsylvania Station while apparently taking a shortcut to catch another train to her job in Washington.The Amtrak employee, Robin Cook, 33, of the 1400 block of St. Michael's Court in Edgewood, was pronounced dead at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center about 10 a.m., a center spokesman said.She was struck by the train at the station off North Charles Street about 7 a.m., Baltimore police said.The victim worked as a secretary for the Amtrak chief of police in the capital.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2005
Robert T. Pierson grew up in Carroll County hearing about the 1905 Western Maryland Railway wreck that killed 26 people. Pierson, 32, owns the Whistle Stop Shops & Cafe in Patapsco, some 300 yards from the site of the wreck, which happened 100 years ago yesterday. "As a kid, I used to go down to the Whistle Stop to buy penny candy and they had old photos of the wreck on the walls. I was fascinated by them, and my grandfather, who was a Western Maryland conductor and who had lived in Patapsco, told stories of the wreck," Pierson said.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers Solis-Cohen Enterprises | November 21, 1993
Q: How do I find out about old electric Lionel trains? My set, purchased in 1938, is in good running condition and has its original box and instructions. Is it valuable?A: Condition, age, rarity and demand help determine how much collectors might pay for a set of old Lionel trains, according to Ron Hollander, 197 Lincoln Ave., Newark, N.J. 07104. He is author of "All Aboard! The Story of Joshua Lionel Cowen & His Toy Train Company," ($14.95 paperback, Workman Publishing). He says your circa 1936-'41 "Commodore Vanderbilt" set, named for the founder of the New York Central Railroad, is a common model, worth around $200.
NEWS
By FRED RASMUSSEN | May 5, 1991
Optimists were in short supply in 1971. When Presiden Richard M. Nixon signed the legislation creating Amtrak, many critics viewed this last desperate attempt to save the intercity passenger train as nothing more than a visit by the undertaker to a terminally ill patient. Passenger trains, critics thought, would be consigned within a few short years to the American technological attic, next to the Conestoga wagon and the overnight packet boat.It didn't happen.On Wednesday, Amtrak was able to light twenty candles on its birthday cake and found itself wallowing not only in public acceptance but congressional acceptance.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | May 11, 1993
In an effort to select trains for its new high-speed service in the Northeast corridor, Amtrak will soon begin testing a German passenger train, which will be available in October on a trial basis on its Metroliner service.The InterCityExpress (ICE) is designed to travel in excess of 150 mph on straight track and could shave five minutes off the two hours and 20 minutes it took the Swedish X-2000 to make its recent trial runs between Washington and New York.Demonstration of the German-built ICE is the next step in Amtrak's $800 million plan to improve service between Washington and Boston to lure automobile and airline passengers.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
ABERDEEN -- Sixty seconds.That's all that kept the January 1987 Amtrak train disaster -- in which an Amtrak passenger train collided with a string of Conrail locomotives in Chase, killing 16 people and injuring 170 others -- from happening in Harford County."
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 17, 2013
An Amtrak train stalled in the Joppatowne area after a mechanical issue Wednesday, and more than 100 passengers were transferred after being stranded for about an hour in 90-degree heat without air-conditioning. When local a emergency crew arrived on the scene shortly after the malfunction was reported, they were baffled to find no one aboard the train. The mechanical problem was reported on Train 91, bound for Miami from New York, between 1:30 p.m. and 1:50 p.m., Amtrak spokeswoman Christina Leeds said.
NEWS
December 12, 2012
100 Years Ago Errant engine A Serious Railroad Accident "The passenger train that left Camden Station a few minutes before 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon for Frederick, Winchester and intermediate stations was derailed in Union Dam tunnel, two miles west of Ellicott City, on the old main line, at 4:58. "The accident was caused by the engine No. 814 attached to the train leaving the tracks and taking the baggage car and two coaches with it. ... The west bound track was cleared at 9 o'clock.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2012
Last summer, when the paving trucks showed up, fans of the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad deservedly got a little nervous. The object of their veneration is a sliver of railroad track that bisects North Charles Street in the Woodbrook neighborhood of Baltimore County. Thousands of drivers who pass over the track every day probably have no idea what it was and where it went. It is left over from the days when the Ma & Pa zigzagged for 77.2 miles across the Maryland countryside from Baltimore to York, Pa. That track, which was left unpaved, is where a head-on collision shattered the tranquillity of a late-spring Saturday afternoon.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
With the coming of Amtrak 40 years ago last week, many of the nation's fabled passenger trains, including the Baltimore & Ohio's premier Capitol Limited, which sailed daily between Washington and Chicago for nearly 50 years, began their final runs April 30, 1971. The clock inextricably ticked toward midnight when at 12:01 a.m. Saturday, May 1, 1971, the National Railroad Passenger Corp. — better known as Amtrak — would assume operation of 182 passenger trains with 21 intercity routes that served 314 American cities and towns.
NEWS
January 23, 2011
For all the controversial efforts to bring high-speed passenger rail to places like California and South Florida, the ideal location for such a major investment is in Baltimore's backyard. That was recently confirmed by an independent study that found the Northeast corridor would return the most bang for the high-speed rail buck of anywhere in the country. The report released this month by America 2050, a coalition of transportation planners and policymakers financed by a handful of charitable foundations, found high-speed rail works best in corridors of 100-600 miles connecting major employment centers, the shorter and more densely populated the better.
NEWS
By Charles H. White, Jr | July 6, 2010
The Obama Administration has discovered high speed passenger rail as both a job stimulus and a means for balancing fuel and environmental constraints with increasing personal transportation needs. Various state and regional groups, supported by self-proclaimed high speed rail experts, are competing for federal seed money grants. Winners will be chosen; losers encouraged to try again with the hope of an ever increasing fund supply. The U.S. Secretary of Transportation visits foreign countries to see how high speed passenger rail works.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Frank D. Roylance and Joe Nawrozki and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff David Michael Ettlin, John Rivera and William B. Talbott contributed to this story | February 6, 1992
An Amtrak secretary was struck and killed by a train today at Pennsylvania Station while apparently taking a shortcut to catch another train to her job in Washington.In unrelated fatal incidents in the past 24 hours, four other people, including a 33-year-old man who was attempting to elude police during a high-speed chase, were killed in automobile accidents.The Amtrak employee, Robin Cook, 33, of the 1400 block of St. Michael's Court in Edgewood, was pronounced dead at the Maryland Shock-Trauma Center about 10 a.m., a center spokesman said.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 27, 2003
SHANGHAI, China - Every weekend, an unusual train glides out from a nondescript station, carrying its passengers at remarkable speeds along tracks high above the farms and factories east of downtown Shanghai. With a cruising speed of nearly 270 miles per hour, it is the fastest passenger train in the world, but what makes the train truly extraordinary is what it lacks underneath its alloy chassis: wheels. At a cost exceeding $1.2 billion, the Shanghai Transrapid line might be the most expensive 19-mile train route on the planet.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | December 2, 2007
George Daniel Williams, a veteran locomotive engineer whose career began with the old Pennsylvania Railroad and ended with Amtrak, died Nov. 25 of complications from a stroke at Lorien Mays Chapel Nursing Center in Timonium. He was 84. Mr. Williams, the son of a farmer, was born and raised in Johnston County, N.C. After graduating from high school in 1941, he worked during World War II in a defense plant in Elizabeth City, N.C. He moved to Baltimore in 1945 and went to work for General Motors' Fisher Body Division on Broening Highway.
NEWS
By G. JEFFERSON PRICE III | December 8, 2005
The "report card" issued by the 9/11 commission this week was a frightening indictment of the administration and Congress for their failure to protect Americans at home. "Scandalous" was the word used by the commission's chairman and vice chairman, former New Jersey Gov. Thomas H. Kean and former Congressman Lee H. Hamilton of Indiana. Scandalous that police and firefighters in the major cities still can't communicate reliably in a major crisis, scandalous that airline passengers still are not screened against a terrorist watch list and scandalous that homeland security money is doled out politically to communities at less risk, rather than to places where the risk is highest.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.