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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | September 3, 2009
Joan Hecht Lorber, who made newspaper headlines in 1939 when she survived the sinking of a torpedoed passenger ship in the early days of World War II, died of Parkinson's disease Aug. 26 at her Boca Raton, Fla., home. She was 80 and had lived in Pikesville until the 1950s. As a 9-year-old, Joan Hecht was returning to Baltimore aboard the liner SS Athenia when it was sunk by a German U-boat after its captain mistook the vessel for an armed merchant cruiser, not the Donaldson American Line passenger ship it was. German authorities immediately suppressed the facts surrounding the torpedoing.
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NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
Although it leads the East Coast in several categories of shipping activity, the port of Baltimore often seems to be hiding in plain sight. So officials used the Saturday observance of National Maritime Day to throw open a pier at the Canton Marine Terminal and invite 28 businesses and agencies that call the port home to hold a career day. "It's the first time we've done this," said former Rep. Helen Delich Bentley, for whom the port is named....
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TRAVEL
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 10, 1999
It is not nearly as romantic as a message in a bottle, but electronic mail is certainly a much faster and more efficient way to communicate with friends and family back on shore from a ship at sea. For example, passengers on the Norwegian Sky, the first ship to offer 24-hour Internet access to passengers, were able to write home instantly when the ship, on one of its first voyages, ran aground in Canada last month.This inauspicious beginning for this new era of floating e-mail access notwithstanding, nearly every other major cruise line is also going full speed ahead to equip its ships with Internet-connected computers.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
The Baltimore Sun's front page on July 22, 1959, carried the news accompanied by a six-column photo: The world's first nuclear-powered cargo ship had been launched at Camden, N.J. The christening of the $47 million N/S Savannah was bigger than news about legislation to extend the GI Bill of Rights, bigger than a Cape Canaveral rocket launch, bigger, even, than a federal court ruling to allow the steamy novel "Lady Chatterley's Lover" to be sent...
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1997
Maybe it's not quite as elegant as it once was. But it is still the Queen Elizabeth 2, the benchmark for luxury liners.On a blustery day, with winds whipping at 35 knots, the legendary passenger ship returned to the United States yesterday after three months at sea, stopping briefly in Baltimore yesterday on its way to Fort Lauderdale, Fla. It was the QE2's second trip here since 1995.Five tugboats nudged the 67,000-ton vessel through the harbor's sharp curves into Dundalk Marine Terminal.
NEWS
March 3, 2012
Apparently my good friend, Fred Rasmussen , who wrote an interesting piece about passenger ship founderings over the past century ("Some show bravery, others cowardice," Feb. 26) was not aware of one of the most outstanding rescues in history. Coincidentally, the master in charge was a ship captain from Baltimore. The rescue has been recorded on a painting entitled "And Every Soul Was Saved. " An engraving of that painting is included as the frontispiece of a book on America's merchant marine, printed in Baltimore in 1915, with the description reading as follows: "The engraving opposite, taken from a famous painting by Thomas M. Hemy, commemorates one of the most graphic rescues at sea ever recorded in the history of maritime events.
TRAVEL
By Tricia Eller | January 9, 2000
See the West on a Harley Thinking of new ways to get together with the family this year? Ride America Motorcycle Tours has a suggestion: Rev up some Harley-Davidsons and hit the road. Three seven-day journeys follow some of America's most scenic and least traveled roads through Arizona, Wyoming, Idaho and Montana, stopping along the way to take in the flavors of small-town life and linger beside national landmarks. The Southwest Tour runs April through June with each excursion beginning Sunday morning in Phoenix, closing the first day at Sedona and continuing through the week to Payson, Pinetop, Safford, Bisbee and Tucson.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
Although it leads the East Coast in several categories of shipping activity, the port of Baltimore often seems to be hiding in plain sight. So officials used the Saturday observance of National Maritime Day to throw open a pier at the Canton Marine Terminal and invite 28 businesses and agencies that call the port home to hold a career day. "It's the first time we've done this," said former Rep. Helen Delich Bentley, for whom the port is named....
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
The Baltimore Sun's front page on July 22, 1959, carried the news accompanied by a six-column photo: The world's first nuclear-powered cargo ship had been launched at Camden, N.J. The christening of the $47 million N/S Savannah was bigger than news about legislation to extend the GI Bill of Rights, bigger than a Cape Canaveral rocket launch, bigger, even, than a federal court ruling to allow the steamy novel "Lady Chatterley's Lover" to be sent...
FEATURES
By Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty and Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty,Contributing Writers | September 6, 1992
"You realize," said our neighbor in the adjacent air-conditioned cabin on Aloha Deck, "if we were VIP passengers sailing in Queen Victoria's day, our luggage tags would have been labeled POSH."A century ago, he explained, on those long hot voyages between England and India, an eastward-facing cabin on the "port out, starboard home" side was the tops in comfort.Today, posh is what everyone gets aboard Princess Cruises' sister ships, the Island and Pacific Princess, on the 10- and 11-day "Polynesian Cruise" between Hawaii and Tahiti.
NEWS
March 3, 2012
Apparently my good friend, Fred Rasmussen , who wrote an interesting piece about passenger ship founderings over the past century ("Some show bravery, others cowardice," Feb. 26) was not aware of one of the most outstanding rescues in history. Coincidentally, the master in charge was a ship captain from Baltimore. The rescue has been recorded on a painting entitled "And Every Soul Was Saved. " An engraving of that painting is included as the frontispiece of a book on America's merchant marine, printed in Baltimore in 1915, with the description reading as follows: "The engraving opposite, taken from a famous painting by Thomas M. Hemy, commemorates one of the most graphic rescues at sea ever recorded in the history of maritime events.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | September 3, 2009
Joan Hecht Lorber, who made newspaper headlines in 1939 when she survived the sinking of a torpedoed passenger ship in the early days of World War II, died of Parkinson's disease Aug. 26 at her Boca Raton, Fla., home. She was 80 and had lived in Pikesville until the 1950s. As a 9-year-old, Joan Hecht was returning to Baltimore aboard the liner SS Athenia when it was sunk by a German U-boat after its captain mistook the vessel for an armed merchant cruiser, not the Donaldson American Line passenger ship it was. German authorities immediately suppressed the facts surrounding the torpedoing.
TRAVEL
By Sheila Young and Sheila Young,Special to The Sun | September 30, 2007
Stomach clenched and legs wobbly, I climb hesitantly to the launch platform of the Dragon's Flight Zipline, discovering that it's a ledge, really, and not much of one. The metal cable that will carry me half a mile at 50 mph is a slim silver line. And I wonder: What in the world was I thinking? This had seemed like a good idea. I wanted a new experience, and the Dragon's Flight, a new Vitality adventure excursion on Royal Caribbean's stop at Labadee, Haiti, its private beach resort, promised me that.
NEWS
By Thomas Frank and Thomas Frank,NEWSDAY | August 12, 2003
Jacqueline Irizarry never imagined that the massive ferry she rides every weekday from Staten Island to lower Manhattan would entice terrorists. Then a few weeks ago she saw eight police officers roaming the boat with rifles and police dogs, and she reconsidered. "Terrorists want to kill thousands of people," Izirarry, 19, said riding the breeze-filled ferry home to Staten Island on Thursday, "so this is the place to do it." The Coast Guard has reached the same surprising conclusion: Large passenger ferries pose the greatest terrorist risk in maritime transportation, because they confine several thousand people in one space far from land and have little or no passenger screening.
TRAVEL
By Tricia Eller | January 9, 2000
See the West on a Harley Thinking of new ways to get together with the family this year? Ride America Motorcycle Tours has a suggestion: Rev up some Harley-Davidsons and hit the road. Three seven-day journeys follow some of America's most scenic and least traveled roads through Arizona, Wyoming, Idaho and Montana, stopping along the way to take in the flavors of small-town life and linger beside national landmarks. The Southwest Tour runs April through June with each excursion beginning Sunday morning in Phoenix, closing the first day at Sedona and continuing through the week to Payson, Pinetop, Safford, Bisbee and Tucson.
TRAVEL
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 10, 1999
It is not nearly as romantic as a message in a bottle, but electronic mail is certainly a much faster and more efficient way to communicate with friends and family back on shore from a ship at sea. For example, passengers on the Norwegian Sky, the first ship to offer 24-hour Internet access to passengers, were able to write home instantly when the ship, on one of its first voyages, ran aground in Canada last month.This inauspicious beginning for this new era of floating e-mail access notwithstanding, nearly every other major cruise line is also going full speed ahead to equip its ships with Internet-connected computers.
NEWS
By Thomas Frank and Thomas Frank,NEWSDAY | August 12, 2003
Jacqueline Irizarry never imagined that the massive ferry she rides every weekday from Staten Island to lower Manhattan would entice terrorists. Then a few weeks ago she saw eight police officers roaming the boat with rifles and police dogs, and she reconsidered. "Terrorists want to kill thousands of people," Izirarry, 19, said riding the breeze-filled ferry home to Staten Island on Thursday, "so this is the place to do it." The Coast Guard has reached the same surprising conclusion: Large passenger ferries pose the greatest terrorist risk in maritime transportation, because they confine several thousand people in one space far from land and have little or no passenger screening.
TRAVEL
By Sheila Young and Sheila Young,Special to The Sun | September 30, 2007
Stomach clenched and legs wobbly, I climb hesitantly to the launch platform of the Dragon's Flight Zipline, discovering that it's a ledge, really, and not much of one. The metal cable that will carry me half a mile at 50 mph is a slim silver line. And I wonder: What in the world was I thinking? This had seemed like a good idea. I wanted a new experience, and the Dragon's Flight, a new Vitality adventure excursion on Royal Caribbean's stop at Labadee, Haiti, its private beach resort, promised me that.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1997
Maybe it's not quite as elegant as it once was. But it is still the Queen Elizabeth 2, the benchmark for luxury liners.On a blustery day, with winds whipping at 35 knots, the legendary passenger ship returned to the United States yesterday after three months at sea, stopping briefly in Baltimore yesterday on its way to Fort Lauderdale, Fla. It was the QE2's second trip here since 1995.Five tugboats nudged the 67,000-ton vessel through the harbor's sharp curves into Dundalk Marine Terminal.
FEATURES
By Arline Bleecker and Arline Bleecker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | October 22, 1995
The world's second largest river begins in Iquitos, high in the Peruvian Andes. It curls across the belly of South America and decants at Belem on Brazil's Atlantic coast. Coursing a whopping 4,000 miles, it is longer than the continental United States is wide.The Amazon is more than big, though. It has a thousand tributaries and carries one-quarter of the planet's free-flowing water, more than any other river in the world. One-third of our oxygen supply is hooked up to the dense, fragile rain forest that flanks it.Like some colossal continental vascular system, the Amazon snakes through the densest jungle landscapes.
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