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Passage Of Time

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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | May 1, 1995
Leslie Wies and Cathy Leaycraft, who constitute the current show at Gomez, make a good pair.They both employ photography in multi-disciplinary works. But more important, in the body of work they're showing, both deal with the passage of time and its consequences. Within this common theme, they convey quite different messages.Wies is essentially an optimist, though her artist's statement doesn't make her sound like one.Her part of the exhibit, she writes, "is about the transient nature of life; how we are all here for just a moment."
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By Cathy Drinkwater Better | March 12, 2014
Sometime after giving birth to my first child, but before getting the third one out the door for good, something weird happened. I can't pinpoint the exact moment, but I'm guessing it was somewhere between learning to read with Dick and Jane and getting my first pair of parachute pants. I think that's when my memories officially went from "feels like yesterday" to "ancient history. " I've always enjoyed browsing antique shops. I'm intrigued by anything and everything from a bygone era, from butter churns to Edwardian jewelry; from 1930s Coke machines to 1950s barber poles; from old furniture to toys that would be considered, by today's standards, not merely unsafe, but lethal.
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By Craig Nova and Craig Nova,Special to the Sun | April 4, 1999
In the spring-time my fancies do, in fact, turn to love, but of a particular kind. And, like the more carnal variety, this one is enhanced by anticipation. Of course, I am speaking of the anticipation that starts for the fly-fisherman at about the time the first snow falls and gains momentum as the winter months advance, like the growing impatience in the heart of a boulevardier for a conquest that was almost, but not quite his.This anticipation is hard to please, too, since a fisherman is always waiting for the next season, the next hatch, the next pool, all of it finally combining in the most intense present moment possible: when a trout takes a fly and disappears with it into the darkness of the waters.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
On the third day of testimony in the trial of three men accused of killing a former Baltimore city councilman, defense attorneys seemed confident Wednesday that none of the witnesses who have testified so far has managed to pinpoint the defendants at the scene of the crime. As the session broke for lunch, two of the lawyers described witnesses as unsure of what they had seen on the night Kenneth N. Harris died, and said that in some cases the witnesses contradicted each other. "No one can identify anyone - even less than I thought," Jason Silverstein, who represents defendant Charles McGaney, said outside the courtroom.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | April 21, 2001
AS THE CELEBRATED Cone Collection reopens this weekend, my thoughts turned to all the times I've walked through those rooms, past the pictures that have worked their way into memory and the status of exalted Baltimore legends. It occurs to me that I've lived here long enough to have been through three Cone Collection installations ever since the Baltimore Museum of Art wing that houses the painting, prints and sculptures made its 1957 debut. In the Baltimore I recall from the 1950s, that first Cone permanent installation made a pretty striking impression.
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By Steve Greenlee and Steve Greenlee,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 7, 2002
The ascent of saxophonist Joshua Redman has been well-documented. Growing up in Berkeley, Calif., he played in school bands and had more than a passing interest in jazz. But he had no intention of making a career in music: When he got to Harvard, he majored in urban studies. After graduating in 1991, he toyed with the idea of medical school and then was offered a spot at Yale's law school. Later that year, he entered the prestigious Thelonious Monk music competition on a whim - and won it. A recording contract from Warner Bros.
NEWS
January 6, 1991
Michael Dukakis, having lost his chance for the presidency, now has to hope history will at least look kindly on his governorship of Massachusetts. For his contemporaries do not. As he left the gold-domed State House hard by Boston Common this past week, having sat in the big leather chair under Sam Adams' portrait for 12 of the last 16 years, his public approval rating was a dismal 20 percent. There is a good chance he couldn't be elected Brookline's dog-catcher.Such is the cruelty of politics.
NEWS
March 18, 1992
More than half a century after she vanished during the last leg of an attempted around-the-world flight, Amelia Earhart is back in the news. At a press conference in Washington this week, a Delaware-based aviation group unveiled tantalizing evidence suggesting Earhart crash-landed on tiny Nikumaroro Island in the Western Pacific, where she and her navigator, Fred Noonan, ultimately perished from exposure and thirst.Richard Gillespie, of the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, said his team turned up a two-foot-long strip from the belly of Earhart's Lockheed Electra during a search of the island last October.
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By BARBARA TUFTY | June 30, 1992
''There's a time for some things, and a time for all things; a time for great things, and a time for small things.''-- Don Quixote, by Miguel de CervantesWashington -- Tick-tock-tick. That's one second. One second to be added to the age of our planet Earth. Today, precisely at 23 hours, 59 minutes, and 59 seconds, Coordinated Universal Time, one leap-second will be added to clocks all over the world.This will be 7:59:59 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time the night before, when the extra second will be inserted in the atomic clock at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington.
NEWS
By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,special to the sun | June 8, 1997
"Money: Who Has How Much and Why," by Andrew Hacker. Scribner. 254 pages. $25.Andrew Hacker gives campus-based intellectualism a gooname. He uses numbers to enlighten instead of obscure, making sure the statistics come alive by illustrating their inexorable messages with cases involving real people.His prose is filled with active verbs and metaphors, instead of the passive voice and jargon frequently churned out by academics. He is willing to tackle a topic across disciplinary lines, conducting research from the Queens College political science department to shed light on a topic usually left to economists.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 26, 2005
There are markers in your life, occasions when you pause and note the passage of time. One of them for me is the bleeding of the radiators. I performed this do-it-yourself chore a few days ago after I reluctantly fired up the household furnace. Company was coming for the Thanksgiving weekend and I figured it probably wasn't polite to make guests, even if they were relatives, rely on sunshine and sweaters to keep from freezing. The furnace heats the water coursing through the household radiators.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 18, 2004
A slow flirtation with a steady burn": that's what movie-maker Richard Linklater was after when he planned Before Sunset as an 80-minute amble through Paris with an American and a Frenchwoman. The man is a novelist named Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and the woman is Celine (Julie Delpy), who inspired his new book with a life-altering one-night stand nine years before in Vienna (as chronicled in Linklater's 1995 film, Before Sunrise). They were supposed to meet in Vienna again, six months after their first tryst.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 2, 2003
He makes other workaholics look like slackers. He makes other sexagenarian singers sound like nonagenarians. He's Placido Domingo -- tenor, conductor, bicoastal opera administrator, record-breaker. No known tenor has ever sung as many operatic roles -- 119, with the 120th slated next season. You can find another tenor or two who has managed an opera company, but not one who did so while still actively singing. Or one who served as artistic director of two opera companies simul-taneously, as Domingo does now in Washington and Los Angeles.
FEATURES
By Steve Greenlee and Steve Greenlee,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 7, 2002
The ascent of saxophonist Joshua Redman has been well-documented. Growing up in Berkeley, Calif., he played in school bands and had more than a passing interest in jazz. But he had no intention of making a career in music: When he got to Harvard, he majored in urban studies. After graduating in 1991, he toyed with the idea of medical school and then was offered a spot at Yale's law school. Later that year, he entered the prestigious Thelonious Monk music competition on a whim - and won it. A recording contract from Warner Bros.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | April 21, 2001
AS THE CELEBRATED Cone Collection reopens this weekend, my thoughts turned to all the times I've walked through those rooms, past the pictures that have worked their way into memory and the status of exalted Baltimore legends. It occurs to me that I've lived here long enough to have been through three Cone Collection installations ever since the Baltimore Museum of Art wing that houses the painting, prints and sculptures made its 1957 debut. In the Baltimore I recall from the 1950s, that first Cone permanent installation made a pretty striking impression.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Nova and Craig Nova,Special to the Sun | April 4, 1999
In the spring-time my fancies do, in fact, turn to love, but of a particular kind. And, like the more carnal variety, this one is enhanced by anticipation. Of course, I am speaking of the anticipation that starts for the fly-fisherman at about the time the first snow falls and gains momentum as the winter months advance, like the growing impatience in the heart of a boulevardier for a conquest that was almost, but not quite his.This anticipation is hard to please, too, since a fisherman is always waiting for the next season, the next hatch, the next pool, all of it finally combining in the most intense present moment possible: when a trout takes a fly and disappears with it into the darkness of the waters.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 1997
If Congressional debates today seem acrimonious, you should have been around in the early summer of 1776. Colonial delegates argued over every word in what became the Declaration of Independence.You can eavesdrop on that revolutionary debate via the Cockpit in Court production of the musical "1776." It brings such personalities as John Adams and Benjamin Franklin alive and helps animate the political issues that made the quest for independence so difficult.As with most historical pageants, it unfortunately has its share of long speeches and tediously didactic moments.
NEWS
By Jocelyn A. Garlington | July 17, 1995
FOR ME, this has been a year of quiet and extraordinary change. Very recently, on a clear, remarkably bright and breezy afternoon, a river of reflection, on which I have been floating for the past few weeks, was spawned. The precipitating events, to those with little or no emotional investment in them, may seem small and even insignificant. But for me, there seems to be a silent but powerful tidal wave of change sweeping away my panic about the future and allowing me to float somewhat serenely on warm memories.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 1997
If Congressional debates today seem acrimonious, you should have been around in the early summer of 1776. Colonial delegates argued over every word in what became the Declaration of Independence.You can eavesdrop on that revolutionary debate via the Cockpit in Court production of the musical "1776." It brings such personalities as John Adams and Benjamin Franklin alive and helps animate the political issues that made the quest for independence so difficult.As with most historical pageants, it unfortunately has its share of long speeches and tediously didactic moments.
NEWS
By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,special to the sun | June 8, 1997
"Money: Who Has How Much and Why," by Andrew Hacker. Scribner. 254 pages. $25.Andrew Hacker gives campus-based intellectualism a gooname. He uses numbers to enlighten instead of obscure, making sure the statistics come alive by illustrating their inexorable messages with cases involving real people.His prose is filled with active verbs and metaphors, instead of the passive voice and jargon frequently churned out by academics. He is willing to tackle a topic across disciplinary lines, conducting research from the Queens College political science department to shed light on a topic usually left to economists.
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