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NEWS
March 28, 1994
Annapolis just filled a vacancy on the City Council by the best means possible -- an election. City voters chose the person they wanted to fill the empty seat. They chose Louise Hammond not because of her party, but because they liked her positions.At any level of government, this ideally is the way representatives should be chosen -- by the people.That is why we cannot support an Annapolis bill that would give power to fill mayoral and aldermanic vacancies to political central committees and, ultimately, to the council itself.
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NEWS
July 4, 2014
I applaud Robert Erlandson's letter regarding the late Sen. Howard Baker and for speaking out on this issue ( "How would Sen. Howard Baker have responded to today's IRS scandal?" July 1). Sadly, many will attack him for making an honest observation and comparison to Watergate. The nature of today's discourse does not accept honest observation. That has been trumped by political agenda. President Richard Nixon stepped down rather than soil the office. He was held to a standard and accepted it. President Barack Obama takes responsibility for nothing.
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NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | May 3, 1992
The chairman of the Columbia Council has sharply criticized the role of two prominent county Democrats in defeating a Republican council member, saying partisan politics have no place in Columbia elections.Charles Acquard of Kings Contrivance Village said the involvement of former County Executive M. Elizabeth Bobo and former County Councilman Lloyd Knowles probably dealt a fatal blow to the re-election campaign of Wilde Lake council representative Michael Deets, a Republican.Both Knowles, a Wilde Lake resident, and Bobo, a village property owner, denied that partisanship played a role, saying they helped Deets' opponent, Norma Rose, because of their longtime friendship.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 4, 2014
The trend of abandoning Congress continues as its longest-serving member, Democratic Rep. John Dingell Jr. of Michigan, former chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, has announced he will retire. He is going out with a bang, remarking that he finds "serving in the House to be obnoxious" given its members' inability to work across party lines. The 87-year-old legislative expert, winding up 58 years of service, also cited President Obama's recent pivot to the use of executive orders to achieve what he can't get through Congress.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 31, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos, a trial lawyer long active in Baltimore politics, has become one of the nation's most generous Democratic donors, having contributed at least $265,000 to party committees and candidates this election season.Angelos, 69, a former Democratic City Council member, says his generosity stems from his allegiance to the party in which he has found a lifelong home.But the longtime trial lawyer, who made a fortune from successful asbestos liability suits, acknowledges another powerful motivation: his unhappiness with congressional Republicans who are intent on limiting legal liability for damages, an issue that has sent many lawyers sprinting into Democratic arms.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2000
In many ways, the race for Howard County school board is a lot like the race for the next president of the United States. On many issues the candidates seem to agree, although their approaches differ, keeping many voters undecided. And, for many county residents, party politics has popped up in the race a little too often. The four candidates for county Board of Education - Stephen C. Bounds, Virginia Charles, Patricia S. Gordon and Jerry D. Johnston - debated their way past 14 other candidates in the March primary to get to this point.
NEWS
May 9, 2012
The hit men of the tea party can carve another notch in their collective gun belts this week with the ouster of Indiana Sen. Richard G. Lugar, a 35-year veteran of the U.S. Senate. Whatever mojo the conservative firebrands had in the 2010 GOP primaries, when they ousted party moderates right and left, is apparently still working for them. Longtime incumbents are not easily toppled, but Mr. Lugar's vulnerabilities were well-documented prior to Tuesday's Indiana primary: The six-term senator is 80 years old, has lived in Northern Virginia for decades (despite using a 1970s-era address for voting purposes)
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | December 5, 1991
Saying it's unfair to Democrats and blacks, the Annapolis DemocraticCentral Committee voted Tuesday to oppose the city's redistricting plan.Committee Chairman Michael T. Brown said the committee voted,5-0, Tuesday night against what he called a "Republican plan." Four members were absent.Brown complained that the plan, which will be presented to the City Council Dec. 16, fails to establish the three majority black districts warranted by Annapolis' 33 percent black population. Instead, hecharged, it makes safe districts for all four Republican aldermen --in particular Wayne Turner, R-Ward 6, who defeated Brown by only four votes in 1989.
NEWS
July 4, 2014
I applaud Robert Erlandson's letter regarding the late Sen. Howard Baker and for speaking out on this issue ( "How would Sen. Howard Baker have responded to today's IRS scandal?" July 1). Sadly, many will attack him for making an honest observation and comparison to Watergate. The nature of today's discourse does not accept honest observation. That has been trumped by political agenda. President Richard Nixon stepped down rather than soil the office. He was held to a standard and accepted it. President Barack Obama takes responsibility for nothing.
NEWS
March 23, 2012
Thanks to political anomalies like Sen. Bobby Zirkin who put their constituents above party politics, there is at least a glimmer of hope that Maryland citizens may not have to pay higher taxes this year to balance the state's budget ("Bobby Zirkin: secret Republican?" March 21). Senator Zirkin not only superbly represents his Baltimore County constituents in District 11, his political actions are helping all of Maryland's citizens. The question is, will enough other delegates have the stomach to challenge the tax-them-to-death policies of the governor and the state's Democratic Party?
NEWS
November 26, 2013
This past weekend's Maryland Republican Party convention was dominated by Larry Hogan's announcement of his intention to run for Governor of Maryland. Lost in the excitement , the assembled central committee members from around the state debated a non-binding resolution calling on the MDGOP to withdraw its support for elected officials who have been "convicted and incarcerated" . The proposal, submitted by the influential chairman of the Baltimore County Republican State Central Committee John Fiastro, Jr. , called on state party leaders to apply the same standards to elected officials of both parties and refuse to support elected officials who are "convicted and incarcerated" while in office.
NEWS
November 6, 2013
While is it generally unwise to read too much into local elections from a handful of states, Tuesday's results produced a message writ too large to ignore. If Republicans want to win over swing voters, they'll need to produce candidates more like New Jersey's pragmatic Chris Christie than Virginia's tea party darling, Ken Cuccinelli II. Governor Christie's 22-point win was as large and loud as the candidate himself. He won by a landslide in a state where Democrats outnumber Republicans by gaining the support from a remarkable number (at least by GOP standards)
NEWS
March 12, 2013
Once again, the Maryland General Assembly, in concert with Gov. Martin O'Malley, demonstrates its total lack of regard and disdain in representing the citizens of Maryland. "One Maryland," as the Governor O'Malley likes to call it, appears to refer only to the views of Prince George's and Montgomery counties and Baltimore City. Notice how blocks of votes are put together in order to advance the agenda of the governor, his political "machine" or these jurisdictions, no matter how the rest of the state weighs in?
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
A Maryland organization says it has found hundreds of dead people listed on voter registration rolls in Baltimore and Prince George's counties, as well as residents who have registered in multiple places and some who have addresses that turn out to be vacant lots. This November, the group says it plans to fan out to polls to watch for problems - but critics say the effort is a smoke screen for a political agenda. Election Integrity Maryland, which is part of a network of volunteers digging through registration lists across the country, says its mission is to ensure the accuracy of voter registration rolls and encourage citizens to participate in the process.
NEWS
May 9, 2012
The hit men of the tea party can carve another notch in their collective gun belts this week with the ouster of Indiana Sen. Richard G. Lugar, a 35-year veteran of the U.S. Senate. Whatever mojo the conservative firebrands had in the 2010 GOP primaries, when they ousted party moderates right and left, is apparently still working for them. Longtime incumbents are not easily toppled, but Mr. Lugar's vulnerabilities were well-documented prior to Tuesday's Indiana primary: The six-term senator is 80 years old, has lived in Northern Virginia for decades (despite using a 1970s-era address for voting purposes)
NEWS
March 23, 2012
Thanks to political anomalies like Sen. Bobby Zirkin who put their constituents above party politics, there is at least a glimmer of hope that Maryland citizens may not have to pay higher taxes this year to balance the state's budget ("Bobby Zirkin: secret Republican?" March 21). Senator Zirkin not only superbly represents his Baltimore County constituents in District 11, his political actions are helping all of Maryland's citizens. The question is, will enough other delegates have the stomach to challenge the tax-them-to-death policies of the governor and the state's Democratic Party?
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,paul.west@baltsun.com | March 22, 2009
Washington - Upstate New York, a cradle of modern party politics, is the unlikely site of a showdown between a couple of Maryland pols, Michael Steele and Chris Van Hollen. Their minidrama is playing out in the background of the first voter test of Barack Obama's presidency, a special election to fill a vacancy in the House of Representatives. It opened up when then-Rep. Kirsten Gillibrand, a Democrat, had the good fortune to get appointed to Hillary Clinton's spot in the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
November 9, 2011
Somebody needs to break the news to the Republican candidates looking to unseat President Barack Obama that the conservative tide that swept the nation in 2010 has receded. Denying public employees the right to bargain collectively and calling for strict limits on the reproductive rights of women won't necessarily play well in 2012. At least it didn't on Tuesday, when voters in several telltale states went to the polls for local elections. Most encouraging for Democrats was the overwhelming defeat of Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich's law limiting the collective bargaining rights of some 350,000 government workers.
NEWS
October 13, 2010
A document making the rounds in Maryland political circles would appear to be a casting call for a Bob Ehrlich campaign ad. One reason there's interest in that: The spot would be shot in California, and Ehrlich has campaigned on the need to bolster Maryland's film industry. Another reason: Among the parts to be cast are Homeless Person #1 and Homeless Person #2, bringing to mind the last time Ehrlich went out of state for homeless people. In 2006, his campaign bused them in from Philly on Election Day to hand out literature that suggested — falsely — that Ehrlich was backed by several black Democratic leaders.
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