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Letter to The Aegis | March 27, 2014
Apparently, the list of filed Republican Central Committee candidates so threatened Harford County's delegates that they filed the emergency bill HB 1513 to "fix" the problem. Republicans from the grassroots to the Chair of the MD GOP have since voiced strong opposition to the bill. Voters elect Central Committees, so members are accountable to them; not to politicians. Committees operate independently of government, carrying out local party business, promoting the party platform, and selecting replacements for elected office vacancies when the need arises.
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NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | March 27, 2014
Apparently, the list of filed Republican Central Committee candidates so threatened Harford County's delegates that they filed the emergency bill HB 1513 to "fix" the problem. Republicans from the grassroots to the Chair of the MD GOP have since voiced strong opposition to the bill. Voters elect Central Committees, so members are accountable to them; not to politicians. Committees operate independently of government, carrying out local party business, promoting the party platform, and selecting replacements for elected office vacancies when the need arises.
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NEWS
February 14, 2013
As a former Republican and grass roots party activist, I was embarrassed by former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s attempt at shoring up the party's wobbly planks ("A midterm election agenda for the GOP," Feb. 10). I'm waiting for a GOP visionary who could slash through rhetoric and the tangled mess we all witnessed during the last election. However, Mr. Ehrlich's comments on spending and deficits were right on, and if the Republicans would only articulate the hazards of sloppy fiscal management and propose realistic reforms, I'd vote GOP again.
NEWS
February 14, 2013
As a former Republican and grass roots party activist, I was embarrassed by former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s attempt at shoring up the party's wobbly planks ("A midterm election agenda for the GOP," Feb. 10). I'm waiting for a GOP visionary who could slash through rhetoric and the tangled mess we all witnessed during the last election. However, Mr. Ehrlich's comments on spending and deficits were right on, and if the Republicans would only articulate the hazards of sloppy fiscal management and propose realistic reforms, I'd vote GOP again.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | August 31, 1996
SO THE CAMPAIGN begins with the Democrats sounding like Republicans and the Republicans like pre-Gingrich Reaganites. Bill Clinton and Bob Dole have imposed party unity and discipline and headed for the center.The only thing lacking is credibility.Mr. Dole is an anti-government, anti-spending, anti-abortion conservative who may have been pragmatic about getting things done in the Senate but has no qualms about the doctrinaire party platform he does not admit to having read.The only part of his program that on the documented record he disbelieves is supply-side economics -- the tax-cut priority he embraced just before taking on its leading proponent, Jack Kemp, as second fiddle.
NEWS
June 9, 1996
FROM THE 1980 Republican platform: "While we recognize differing views on this [abortion] question among Americans in general -- and in our own party -- we affirm our support of a constitutional amendment to restore protection of the right to life for unborn children."By the 1984 convention, which nominated Ronald Reagan for the second time, the GOP was no longer recognizing "differing views on this question." The anti-abortion movement was in full control of the party.By 1992, abortion had become so politicized that Pennsylvania's pro-life governor, Bob Casey, was not allowed to address the Democratic convention and the Republican convention was so manifestly intolerant of the "differing views" of abortion-rights advocates that George Bush's re-election bid was damaged.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | October 1, 1992
WAITING FOR PEROT, let's get real about third parties and independent presidential candidates in America.They never amount to anything.What, never? Well, hardly ever.In the whole history of truly partisan voting, starting with the Whigs-Democrats clash in 1836 and on through the Republicans-Democrats contests since 1856, the only third parties to win a percentage of the popular vote in even the low double-digits were the Free Soilers in 1848, the Republicans in 1856 (they began as a third party)
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | August 12, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- If you want to understand why Republican politicians are so discouraged about their presidential prospects this year, you have only to study Bob Dole's handling -- or mishandling -- of the abortion rights issue and the party platform.Mr. Dole seemed to be taking charge several weeks ago when he said he would insist that the platform include what became known as "tolerance language" -- meaning a recognition that Republicans could disagree on abortion with civility.When the question arose whether that language would be applied somewhat ambiguously to the entire platform or specifically to the abortion rights question, Mr. Dole said it would be the latter.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | July 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The new Democratic Party platform addresses some of the usual concerns of federal and other workers as well as some other issues that have come to the forefront in the 1990s, such as sexual harassment and environmental degradation.The platform, adopted at last week's Democratic National Convention in New York, sets the goals of the party for the coming four years. The plan was based on input from officials and constituent groups from around the country.Marylanders sitting on the Democratic National Committee's platform committee included Comptroller Louis Goldstein, Ina Taylor, Leon Billings, Margareta Crampton, Al From and Robert P. Legg.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | July 10, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Party platforms have seldom meant much to average voters as they've trooped to the polls in November. The long-winded documents are written by party insiders and then customarily forgotten, not only by voters who are barely aware of their contents but even by the party nominees who supposedly run on them. This year apparently will be no exception, based on the assurances of the Republican platform committee chairman, Gov. Tommy Thompson of Wisconsin, and his Democratic counterpart, Gov. Jim Hunt of North Carolina, after showcase hearings designed to demonstrate that the party cares about what interested, activist folks think should be in the platforms.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | July 10, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Party platforms have seldom meant much to average voters as they've trooped to the polls in November. The long-winded documents are written by party insiders and then customarily forgotten, not only by voters who are barely aware of their contents but even by the party nominees who supposedly run on them. This year apparently will be no exception, based on the assurances of the Republican platform committee chairman, Gov. Tommy Thompson of Wisconsin, and his Democratic counterpart, Gov. Jim Hunt of North Carolina, after showcase hearings designed to demonstrate that the party cares about what interested, activist folks think should be in the platforms.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | August 31, 1996
SO THE CAMPAIGN begins with the Democrats sounding like Republicans and the Republicans like pre-Gingrich Reaganites. Bill Clinton and Bob Dole have imposed party unity and discipline and headed for the center.The only thing lacking is credibility.Mr. Dole is an anti-government, anti-spending, anti-abortion conservative who may have been pragmatic about getting things done in the Senate but has no qualms about the doctrinaire party platform he does not admit to having read.The only part of his program that on the documented record he disbelieves is supply-side economics -- the tax-cut priority he embraced just before taking on its leading proponent, Jack Kemp, as second fiddle.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | August 12, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- If you want to understand why Republican politicians are so discouraged about their presidential prospects this year, you have only to study Bob Dole's handling -- or mishandling -- of the abortion rights issue and the party platform.Mr. Dole seemed to be taking charge several weeks ago when he said he would insist that the platform include what became known as "tolerance language" -- meaning a recognition that Republicans could disagree on abortion with civility.When the question arose whether that language would be applied somewhat ambiguously to the entire platform or specifically to the abortion rights question, Mr. Dole said it would be the latter.
NEWS
August 7, 1996
HAS THE REPUBLICAN Party been taken over by religious zealots who are intolerant even of tolerance? Former Sen. Robert Dole had good reason to fear as much after the Christian Coalition majority on the GOP Platform Committee brushed aside his call for a "declaration of tolerance" on abortion and even exorcised the dreaded T-word from its draft document.What the Dole presidential campaign hopes to salvage from this defeat is a Republican National Convention in San Diego next week devoid of the kind of Pat Buchanan "cultural wars" oratory that marred the Houston convention four years ago and contributed to George Bush's defeat.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 5, 1996
WASHINGTON -- It was the second day of the 1980 Democratic National Convention in New York's Madison Square Garden. Delegates backing President Jimmy Carter had just won a crucial test vote on a rules dispute that had been raised by Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, who had been challenging Carter for the nomination.In an episode that illustrates as well as any the meaning of party platforms in modern American politics, the Carter managers faced the question of whether they could win a similar fight over the platform.
NEWS
June 9, 1996
FROM THE 1980 Republican platform: "While we recognize differing views on this [abortion] question among Americans in general -- and in our own party -- we affirm our support of a constitutional amendment to restore protection of the right to life for unborn children."By the 1984 convention, which nominated Ronald Reagan for the second time, the GOP was no longer recognizing "differing views on this question." The anti-abortion movement was in full control of the party.By 1992, abortion had become so politicized that Pennsylvania's pro-life governor, Bob Casey, was not allowed to address the Democratic convention and the Republican convention was so manifestly intolerant of the "differing views" of abortion-rights advocates that George Bush's re-election bid was damaged.
NEWS
August 7, 1996
HAS THE REPUBLICAN Party been taken over by religious zealots who are intolerant even of tolerance? Former Sen. Robert Dole had good reason to fear as much after the Christian Coalition majority on the GOP Platform Committee brushed aside his call for a "declaration of tolerance" on abortion and even exorcised the dreaded T-word from its draft document.What the Dole presidential campaign hopes to salvage from this defeat is a Republican National Convention in San Diego next week devoid of the kind of Pat Buchanan "cultural wars" oratory that marred the Houston convention four years ago and contributed to George Bush's defeat.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 5, 1996
WASHINGTON -- It was the second day of the 1980 Democratic National Convention in New York's Madison Square Garden. Delegates backing President Jimmy Carter had just won a crucial test vote on a rules dispute that had been raised by Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, who had been challenging Carter for the nomination.In an episode that illustrates as well as any the meaning of party platforms in modern American politics, the Carter managers faced the question of whether they could win a similar fight over the platform.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | October 1, 1992
WAITING FOR PEROT, let's get real about third parties and independent presidential candidates in America.They never amount to anything.What, never? Well, hardly ever.In the whole history of truly partisan voting, starting with the Whigs-Democrats clash in 1836 and on through the Republicans-Democrats contests since 1856, the only third parties to win a percentage of the popular vote in even the low double-digits were the Free Soilers in 1848, the Republicans in 1856 (they began as a third party)
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | July 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The new Democratic Party platform addresses some of the usual concerns of federal and other workers as well as some other issues that have come to the forefront in the 1990s, such as sexual harassment and environmental degradation.The platform, adopted at last week's Democratic National Convention in New York, sets the goals of the party for the coming four years. The plan was based on input from officials and constituent groups from around the country.Marylanders sitting on the Democratic National Committee's platform committee included Comptroller Louis Goldstein, Ina Taylor, Leon Billings, Margareta Crampton, Al From and Robert P. Legg.
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