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By Lisa Mascaro and Richard Simon, Tribune Newspapers | November 22, 2010
John A. Boehner, soon to be speaker of the House, is a conservative Midwesterner who loves his cigarettes. Nancy Pelosi is a San Francisco liberal who, upon becoming speaker four years ago, banned smoking near the House chamber, where Boehner enjoyed puffing away between votes. She introduced organic food choices to the House cafeteria. He prefers "food that I can pronounce. " She believes in active government. He believes in shrinking government. They are a political and personal odd couple, a pair of wary prize fighters who nonetheless have maintained a cordial relationship and respect for each other's political skills.
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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Despite President Clinton's rather rocky road through 1993, which has a goodly number of Republicans breathing hard about their prospects for retaking the White House in 1996, nothing much seems to have happened through Clinton's first period in the Oval Office to clarify the GOP presidential outlook for the '96 race.Conversations with a number of leading party figures yield the opinion that while the party's fortunes appear to be on the rise again, no one potential standard-bearer has benefited particularly, either as a result of Clinton's low standing in the polls or the actions of that prospect in his own behalf.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 14, 1992
LONDON -- Neil Kinnock, the man who brought the Labor Party out of the wilderness -- but just not far enough -- resigned the party leadership yesterday.After Thursday's defeat at the hands of the Conservatives, it was expected.In a statement to his colleagues, the red-haired Welshman who rebuilt the Labor Party from a ruin of union and leftist domination, then for eight years harried and challenged Margaret Thatcher and her successor, John Major, said, "I will not be seeking re-election as leader of the Labor Party."
NEWS
By Clyde Haberman and Clyde Haberman,New York Times News Service | February 20, 1992
JERUSALEM -- In a vote that may affect the shape of Israel's next government and the course of Middle East peace talks, Yitzhak Rabin defeated Shimon Peres early today for the leadership of the opposition Labor Party in national elections early this summer.But in a four-candidate party primary, the first such vote ever conducted in Israel, it was not clear how solidly Mr. Rabin held the 40 percent share he needs to avoid a runoff next Wednesday against Mr. Peres, the incumbent leader and his political rival for nearly two decades.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 2, 2004
JERUSALEM - Ariel Sharon's trademark characteristics include his bulky build, a trumpeting voice - and an extraordinary political resilience. Today, that storied ability to bounce back from adversity will be put to a crucial test as members of his conservative Likud Party hold a referendum on the Israeli prime minister's proposal to withdraw from the Gaza Strip. Polls have suggested they are likely to reject the plan. Sharon envisions his initiative as an ambitious first step toward drawing the borders of Israel and those of a future Palestinian state.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | August 12, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- If you want to understand why Republican politicians are so discouraged about their presidential prospects this year, you have only to study Bob Dole's handling -- or mishandling -- of the abortion rights issue and the party platform.Mr. Dole seemed to be taking charge several weeks ago when he said he would insist that the platform include what became known as "tolerance language" -- meaning a recognition that Republicans could disagree on abortion with civility.When the question arose whether that language would be applied somewhat ambiguously to the entire platform or specifically to the abortion rights question, Mr. Dole said it would be the latter.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 26, 2011
Tennessee Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander caused a ripple on Capitol Hill last week by announcing he will drop out of his party's Senate leadership to pursue a more independent course, which would seem to be a break from the GOP's my-way-or-the-highway solidarity. The news that in January he will give up his No. 3 position as Republican conference chairman was particularly surprising because the two-time presidential candidate has always been a conspicuous climber. A few years ago he ran for the No. 2 spot as Senate Republican whip and missed by a single vote; he had been expected to try again, with Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona, the incumbent whip, slated for retirement.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 30, 2002
JERUSALEM - Israel's coalition government faces a parliamentary showdown today over one of the most contentious issues in Israeli politics - the government's financial support for Jewish settlements in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. Leaders of the left-of-center Labor Party are threatening to leave the government because of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's request for about $416 million to subsidize settlements. If Labor carries out its threat, it would destabilize Sharon's government and potentially delay any attempt to negotiate a peace settlement with the Palestinians.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 8, 2002
BEIJING - The last time power changed hands at the top of China's Communist Party, the event was preceded by hundreds of thousands of students leading demonstrations in Beijing's Tiananmen Square and other cities demanding democratic reforms. Thirteen years later, President Jiang Zemin, 76, is set to surrender his post as general secretary of the Communist Party to his anointed successor, Vice President Hu Jintao, 59, at the party congress that opens today. And China's young, bright minds are too busy having fun and planning careers to stop and take note.
NEWS
By Todd Eberly | November 27, 2011
Woodrow Wilson once observed: "Congress in committee is Congress at work. " But what was once a keen observation is now little more than an anachronism describing a Congress that no longer exists. In theory, the committee structure is crucial to a functioning Congress. By dividing the work among specialized "mini-congresses," the committee system allows Congress to become greater than the sum of its parts. Committees allow Congress to overcome the challenges of managing a diverse and numerous body through specialization and structure.
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