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By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 12, 1997
BEIJING -- With the world's last major Communist Party opening its most important meeting in years here today, its top leader -- General Secretary Jiang Zemin -- is expected to preach capitalism.He won't use the forbidden word. It will be cloaked in the same Communist jargon that appears on banners festooning the city.But analysts say his message should be clear: China must speed up the privatization of its failing state-owned enterprises, which threaten to derail the country's drive toward a market economy.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
Something unusual happened when the controversy over the nation's health care law erupted again on the floor of the House of Representatives this month: A Maryland Democrat voted with Republicans. Rep. John Delaney, the state's newest member of Congress, was one of 35 Democrats out of 200 to vote for a Republican proposal to delay a requirement that large businesses offer health coverage to workers. He was the only Democrat from Maryland to do so. Seven months into his first term, the former Potomac banker has made several moves — some symbolic, others substantive — to chart a centrist course in a Congress that is bitterly divided by partisan politics.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 2000
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - A characteristically defiant Slobodan Milosevic staged his political comeback yesterday, winning re-election as leader of his Socialist Party of Serbia and denouncing as a coup the popular uprising that swept him from power last month. In his first public appearance since he accepted his election defeat and resigned as the Yugoslav president on Oct. 6, a day after the uprising, Milosevic gave an aggressive opening speech to the Socialist Party congress. "Everybody in this hall knows what kind of violence and lawlessness has taken place since the coup on Oct. 5," he said.
NEWS
March 30, 2010
Michael DeCicco refers to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi as "arrogant," "power hungry," and incompetent ("Democrats are to blame for the nation's unrest," March 30). I disagree, but then Republicans know a good bit about arrogance and power hunger, and even more about incompetence. But it is apparent that Mr De Cicco needs to send his "truthometer" in for its overdue 10,000 mile checkup. In truth, the "despicable behavior" of which Mr. DeCicco speaks occurred not in Congress but in the ranks of the tea party mob. In truth, the "acts of vandalism" to which he refers are crimes.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | October 12, 1992
BEIJING -- The Chinese Communist Party's national congress, which opens here today, will put out to pasture many of China's old-guard, conservative revolutionaries by abolishing a key advisory body for retired leaders.During its six-day meeting, the congress will change the party's charter in order to eliminate its Central Advisory Commission, a congress spokesman, Liu Chongde, announced yesterday.The commission -- composed of about 200 members, many well into their 80s -- was created 10 years ago by Chinese patriarch Deng Xiaoping as a way to gracefully move many other elderly party leaders out of the political limelight.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | October 17, 1992
BEIJING -- China's president, defense minister, parliament head and five other senior leaders will retire from top-level positions within the Chinese Communist Party, a Beijing-backed newspaper in Hong Kong reported yesterday.The eight leaders currently make up a majority of the party's highest body, its 14-member Politburo. Two of them also sit on the Politburo's Standing Committee, the ultimate decision-making body in China. They range in age from 66 to 85.With the party holding its national congress this week, the eight have asked not to be considered for election to the party's Central Committee, from which Politburo seats and other top positions are filled, the Hong Kong report said.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | September 23, 1992
BEIJING -- The Chinese Communist Party appears ready to formally enshrine patriarch Deng Xiaoping's full-speed-ahead approach to economic reform as China's direction for the next five years.Capping months of speculation, the state-run Xinhua news service yesterday announced that the 14th national party congress will open Oct. 12 and will "take as its guide" Mr. Deng's dramatic drive this year for stepping up China's market-style economic reforms.Xinhua said that the key meeting, held every five years, will mobilize the Chinese people "to further emancipate their minds and seize the opportune moment to accelerate the pace of reform, opening to the outside world and modernization."
NEWS
October 17, 1991
Speaking of rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic, the long-awaited Fourth Communist Party Congress of Cuba decided to legitimize the flourishing private market of plumbers and other individual tradesmen. It shuffled the Central Committee and Politburo to be somewhat younger and more moderate. It called for more exports to hard currency countries ,, and for foreign investment to lure tourists. It wants to increase participation in the one-party political monopoly somewhat. That Fidel Castro's plan to deal with the collapse of world communism and with Cuba's stunning isolation.
NEWS
August 18, 1991
North Vietnam conquered South Vietnam in 1975 and now, slowly and partially, the more prosperous and less Communist South is reversing the process.The news from the Communist Party congress in Hanoi is that Prime Minister Do Muoi, a 74-year-old Communist, is taking over as party secretary-general. Seven of the 12 members of the Politboro retired, including his predecessor Nguyen Van Linh, the president, the foreign minister and the interior minister. The new 13-member body will have many in their 50s instead of 70s, and five from the South in place of three.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 28, 1997
BEIJING -- One of the biggest guessing games here ended yesterday when the Chinese Communist Party announced that it would open its most important meeting in years Sept. 12.In most countries, such information would have been a matter of public record months, if not years, ahead of the event. But until yesterday, the timing of China's 15th Party Congress was something of a state secret.The congress -- which is part convention, part national election -- is the first since the death of paramount leader Deng Xiaoping.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 18, 2007
BEIJING -- A rare open letter signed by 17 former top officials and conservative Marxist scholars before a key Communist Party meeting accuses China's top leaders of steering the country in the wrong direction, pandering to foreigners, betraying the workers' revolution and jeopardizing social stability. "We're going down an evil road," said the letter posted on the Web site Mao Zedong's Flag. "The whole country is at a most precarious time." The challenge is unusual both for the importance of its signatories and for its timing during the time leading up to this fall's Party Congress -- an event held once every five years and a key date on the political calendar.
NEWS
By William Neikirk and Paul Singer and William Neikirk and Paul Singer,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 7, 2003
WASHINGTON - In deciding to go on national television tonight to push an Iraqi financial package of up to $80 billion, President Bush is responding to pressure from his party to be more open about his plans for the country's occupation and reconstruction. At a time of economic distress at home and growing criticism about American casualties in Iraq, Republican congressional sources said GOP House and Senate leaders made it clear to Bush that he needs to be more forthright about what the U.S. commitment in Iraq entails.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - It was a scene more worthy of a smoky bar than of one of the most powerful committees in the House of Representatives. Insults were hurled, threats were made and the police were summoned. In the end, there was even a trial of sorts. But this was no barroom brawl. It began as a meeting of the House Ways and Means Committee. It culminated with an angry debate in the full House over whether to formally scold the Republican chairman of the panel, the notoriously prickly Rep. Bill Thomas of California, for siccing the cops on his Democratic colleagues.
NEWS
November 17, 2002
IN ONE OF THE MANY cavernous rooms of Beijing's Great Hall of the People late last week, nine men emerged from behind a screen to greet the press. Just named to China's ruling body -- the Standing Committee of the Politburo of the Chinese Communist Party -- they came out in single file, in rough order of political power. That almost charmingly anachronistic theater underscored that the world's most populous nation still largely operates, as always, by the rule of man, not the rule of law. It also began the next chapter in the world's greatest balancing act -- the continual accommodations by which the world's premier authoritarian party-state seeks legitimacy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 2000
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - A characteristically defiant Slobodan Milosevic staged his political comeback yesterday, winning re-election as leader of his Socialist Party of Serbia and denouncing as a coup the popular uprising that swept him from power last month. In his first public appearance since he accepted his election defeat and resigned as the Yugoslav president on Oct. 6, a day after the uprising, Milosevic gave an aggressive opening speech to the Socialist Party congress. "Everybody in this hall knows what kind of violence and lawlessness has taken place since the coup on Oct. 5," he said.
NEWS
September 21, 1997
DEMANDING CONTRADICTIONS, the 15th Communist Party Congress of China is enshrining Deng Xiaoping Theory along with Mao Zedong Thought. Economic ownership must represent diverse interests; political control and expression must be monolithic. As though the two had nothing to do with each other.Party boss Jiang Zemin, the late Deng Xiaoping's last protege, decreed a breathtaking clean-out of China's creaking state industries, which drag down growth and production while keeping the populace ostensibly employed.
NEWS
November 17, 2002
IN ONE OF THE MANY cavernous rooms of Beijing's Great Hall of the People late last week, nine men emerged from behind a screen to greet the press. Just named to China's ruling body -- the Standing Committee of the Politburo of the Chinese Communist Party -- they came out in single file, in rough order of political power. That almost charmingly anachronistic theater underscored that the world's most populous nation still largely operates, as always, by the rule of man, not the rule of law. It also began the next chapter in the world's greatest balancing act -- the continual accommodations by which the world's premier authoritarian party-state seeks legitimacy.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | July 2, 1991
BEIJING -- The Chinese Communist Party, riddled with corruption and increasingly isolated in a world moving away from socialism, celebrated its 70th birthday yesterday with a good deal of fanfare aimed at buttressing its sagging legitimacy."
NEWS
By William Pfaff | September 18, 1997
PARIS -- The announcement that China will sell off its state industries, made last Friday at the 15th Communist Party Congress in Beijing, invites misunderstanding about China's economic liberalization.The announcement has also fueled discussion of what some contend is China's irresistible ascent to regional and even global power, challenging America's present standing as the dominant military power and political influence in the western Pacific.At the party congress, following what appears to have been considerable controversy within the leadership, President Jiang Zemin said that some 10,000 of the 13,000 medium- and large-sized enterprises owned by the state will be sold.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 12, 1997
BEIJING -- With the world's last major Communist Party opening its most important meeting in years here today, its top leader -- General Secretary Jiang Zemin -- is expected to preach capitalism.He won't use the forbidden word. It will be cloaked in the same Communist jargon that appears on banners festooning the city.But analysts say his message should be clear: China must speed up the privatization of its failing state-owned enterprises, which threaten to derail the country's drive toward a market economy.
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