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By HAL BOEDEKER and HAL BOEDEKER,ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 11, 2005
Brad and Angelina don't enthrall you? Jennifer and Vince haven't earned your friendship with their teasing? Tom and Katie didn't have you at hello? Anyone weary of star preening - and the media's slavish attention to it - will find delirious relief in Celebrity Autobiography: In Their Own Words. This adult special, premiering at 10 p.m. Thursday on Bravo, punctures performers' pomposity with stinging success. Celebrity Autobiography started seven years ago when Los Angeles comedians transformed vapid memoirs into zany theater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Denise Weiss | July 16, 2013
Holla at 'cha Brother Nate It's Week 8 of "The Bachelorette" which means time for the hometown dates! I'm not sure how they are going to top last week's “picnic on a go-kart track” date, but hopefully Des' potential future ex-fiance's family has something exciting in store for her.  The remaining four guys: Chris (I will write another poem for you my dear, I hope the viewers don't shove a pen in their ear), Brooks (I don't know the difference between an adjective and a verb)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 13, 1994
Take "The Partridge Family" and set it to jazz; give it heart, soul, spunk and spice, let it roam and sizzle, let it get down, be funny and tender at once -- and you have Spike Lee's "Crooklyn."In fact, Lee continually evokes that weirdly resonant '70s TV show, with its milky-white torrent of pieties, bad music and stingless, zingless humor, in contrast with his Partridges, a deliriously unkempt and boisterous crew of mischief-makers and ruckus-rousers -- that is to say, a real family -- called the Carmichaels, who spill through a brownstone in the Brooklyn of the same era. It's set, in other words, in that Magic Innocent American Camelot before Danny Bonaduce went to jail!
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | February 6, 2010
News item: Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti said during Wednesday's "State of the Ravens" news conference that quarterback Joe Flacco is the key to his team's chances of developing into a Super Bowl champion. My take: If this were simply a statement of fact, it would rank on the revelation scale somewhere between "ice is cold" and "you can find my blog - The Schmuck Stops Here - at baltimoresun.com/schmuckblog," but it was pretty apparent that Bisciotti was sending a message to Joe Cool and Co. that he isn't going to be satisfied with the second round of the playoffs every year.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 13, 2001
LOS ANGELES - Syndicated television this fall is shaping up as the industry's dead zone. There's such a drought of compelling new ideas, the best hope for a breakout show rests on the uneven shoulders of Partridge Family bad boy Danny Bonaduce. The nation's television critics this week received a preview of a handful of syndicated programs that will make their debuts this September, and the lineup has an unfortunate aura of deja vu with old game shows, reality dating programs and talk shows dominating the offerings that will round out local stations' daytime and early evening schedules.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,HARTFORD COURANT | August 29, 2004
The Simple Life may have been nothing more than a reality variation of Green Acres, and The Apprentice and its imitators not so far removed from the late '50s drama The Millionaire. A reality version of The Beverly Hillbillies has been stalled in its attempt to get on TV (though CBS execs hint it may be produced in secret, much as the current UPN reality show that met with initial controversy, Amish in the City). But a couple of cable networks are moving full speed ahead on reality TV remakes of classic shows.
FEATURES
By Lisa Wiseman and Nestor Aparicio and Lisa Wiseman and Nestor Aparicio,Special to The Evening Sun | October 8, 1991
STANDING OUTSIDE of Max's on Broadway in Fells Point, waiting to get in to see former teen idol and heartthrob David Cassidy, 30-year-old Jessica Masten said, "This is a major nostalgia trip. I'm not just going to stand there, I'm going to act like I'm 12 again."And most of the women, mostly in their late 20s or early 30s, did: the scene resembled a slumber party as they swapped stories, giggled and told of their teen-age devotion to Keith Partridge, the oldest boy of television's "The Partridge Family."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | February 6, 2010
News item: Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti said during Wednesday's "State of the Ravens" news conference that quarterback Joe Flacco is the key to his team's chances of developing into a Super Bowl champion. My take: If this were simply a statement of fact, it would rank on the revelation scale somewhere between "ice is cold" and "you can find my blog - The Schmuck Stops Here - at baltimoresun.com/schmuckblog," but it was pretty apparent that Bisciotti was sending a message to Joe Cool and Co. that he isn't going to be satisfied with the second round of the playoffs every year.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | August 13, 2008
The 800 drummers weren't the only highly synchronized performers at China's Olympic opening ceremony. Less well-received: the lip-syncing pigtailed girl in the red dress. A collective boo/hiss moved across the globe yesterday as word spread that the sweet-voiced cherub actually didn't sing the song spotlighted during Friday's event. It was actually another, supposedly less photogenic, child. According to the Associated Press, the government made the call to pull the chubby-faced tot with crooked teeth but an angelic voice and bring in the pixie ringer who became a national celebrity after the show.
FEATURES
By Patricia Rodriguez and Patricia Rodriguez,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | August 20, 1993
Talk about back to the future. In the space of three days on three separate channels last month, it was possible to witness the following: "The Partridge Family," in full-color rerun. "The Partridge Family" again, this time introduced by a fortysomething David Cassidy, wearing a modified shag haircut and driving a psychedelic bus. And then the modern David Cassidy again, this time with a microphone instead of the bus, singing "I Think I Love You." Haven't we already been there, done that?
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | August 13, 2008
The 800 drummers weren't the only highly synchronized performers at China's Olympic opening ceremony. Less well-received: the lip-syncing pigtailed girl in the red dress. A collective boo/hiss moved across the globe yesterday as word spread that the sweet-voiced cherub actually didn't sing the song spotlighted during Friday's event. It was actually another, supposedly less photogenic, child. According to the Associated Press, the government made the call to pull the chubby-faced tot with crooked teeth but an angelic voice and bring in the pixie ringer who became a national celebrity after the show.
NEWS
By HAL BOEDEKER and HAL BOEDEKER,ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 11, 2005
Brad and Angelina don't enthrall you? Jennifer and Vince haven't earned your friendship with their teasing? Tom and Katie didn't have you at hello? Anyone weary of star preening - and the media's slavish attention to it - will find delirious relief in Celebrity Autobiography: In Their Own Words. This adult special, premiering at 10 p.m. Thursday on Bravo, punctures performers' pomposity with stinging success. Celebrity Autobiography started seven years ago when Los Angeles comedians transformed vapid memoirs into zany theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,HARTFORD COURANT | August 29, 2004
The Simple Life may have been nothing more than a reality variation of Green Acres, and The Apprentice and its imitators not so far removed from the late '50s drama The Millionaire. A reality version of The Beverly Hillbillies has been stalled in its attempt to get on TV (though CBS execs hint it may be produced in secret, much as the current UPN reality show that met with initial controversy, Amish in the City). But a couple of cable networks are moving full speed ahead on reality TV remakes of classic shows.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 13, 2001
LOS ANGELES - Syndicated television this fall is shaping up as the industry's dead zone. There's such a drought of compelling new ideas, the best hope for a breakout show rests on the uneven shoulders of Partridge Family bad boy Danny Bonaduce. The nation's television critics this week received a preview of a handful of syndicated programs that will make their debuts this September, and the lineup has an unfortunate aura of deja vu with old game shows, reality dating programs and talk shows dominating the offerings that will round out local stations' daytime and early evening schedules.
FEATURES
By Mike Littwin | August 30, 1996
Dick Morris, senior political adviser and joy boy, resigned yesterday from the Clinton campaign amid allegations that he was consorting with a $200-an-hour, escort-service hooker.This immediately brings two questions to mind:A. Why would such a powerful man risk everything for a few bought-and-paid-for rolls in the hay?B. When did escort-service hookers come to cost 200 bucks?In either case, it was a nice way to end the Democrats' "family values" convention, in which the Democrats broke the record for the most times using the word "family" in the non-Sister Sledge competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 13, 1994
Take "The Partridge Family" and set it to jazz; give it heart, soul, spunk and spice, let it roam and sizzle, let it get down, be funny and tender at once -- and you have Spike Lee's "Crooklyn."In fact, Lee continually evokes that weirdly resonant '70s TV show, with its milky-white torrent of pieties, bad music and stingless, zingless humor, in contrast with his Partridges, a deliriously unkempt and boisterous crew of mischief-makers and ruckus-rousers -- that is to say, a real family -- called the Carmichaels, who spill through a brownstone in the Brooklyn of the same era. It's set, in other words, in that Magic Innocent American Camelot before Danny Bonaduce went to jail!
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | July 10, 1993
It was the decade taste forgot, a time of Dacron and disco, "Shaft" and smiley faces, platform shoes and "The Partridge Family." We're speaking, of course, of the '70s, a time of stupid fads, silly clothes and sappy music -- an era which, for most people, seemed like 10 straight years of bad-hair days.And suddenly, it's the hippest thing around.Seventies chic. It sounds preposterous, doesn't it? Yet the evidence is all around us, from the astounding success of "The Real Live Brady Bunch," a stage show offering slavishly accurate re-enactments of sitcom episodes, to the inexplicable resurgence of basso balladeer Barry White, who has popped up everywhere from "Arsenio" to "The Simpsons."
FEATURES
By Mike Littwin | August 30, 1996
Dick Morris, senior political adviser and joy boy, resigned yesterday from the Clinton campaign amid allegations that he was consorting with a $200-an-hour, escort-service hooker.This immediately brings two questions to mind:A. Why would such a powerful man risk everything for a few bought-and-paid-for rolls in the hay?B. When did escort-service hookers come to cost 200 bucks?In either case, it was a nice way to end the Democrats' "family values" convention, in which the Democrats broke the record for the most times using the word "family" in the non-Sister Sledge competition.
FEATURES
By Patricia Rodriguez and Patricia Rodriguez,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | August 20, 1993
Talk about back to the future. In the space of three days on three separate channels last month, it was possible to witness the following: "The Partridge Family," in full-color rerun. "The Partridge Family" again, this time introduced by a fortysomething David Cassidy, wearing a modified shag haircut and driving a psychedelic bus. And then the modern David Cassidy again, this time with a microphone instead of the bus, singing "I Think I Love You." Haven't we already been there, done that?
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | July 10, 1993
It was the decade taste forgot, a time of Dacron and disco, "Shaft" and smiley faces, platform shoes and "The Partridge Family." We're speaking, of course, of the '70s, a time of stupid fads, silly clothes and sappy music -- an era which, for most people, seemed like 10 straight years of bad-hair days.And suddenly, it's the hippest thing around.Seventies chic. It sounds preposterous, doesn't it? Yet the evidence is all around us, from the astounding success of "The Real Live Brady Bunch," a stage show offering slavishly accurate re-enactments of sitcom episodes, to the inexplicable resurgence of basso balladeer Barry White, who has popped up everywhere from "Arsenio" to "The Simpsons."
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