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By Arin Gencer | arin.gencer@baltsun.com | November 27, 2009
They huddled around the computer in Jeremy Smith's physics classroom during study hall at Hereford High School, scanning columns and columns of numbers. "It's delayed a minute - we have to wait," Andrew Linhard, 17, said to fellow senior Scott Forster, also 17, who was manning the mouse. They and several classmates kept examining the screen and tried to reconcile two dizzying windows of data - which they hoped were correctly collected from a device hooked up to the computer.
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NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | November 27, 2009
They huddled around the computer in Jeremy Smith's physics classroom during study hall at Hereford High School, scanning columns and columns of numbers. "It's delayed a minute - we have to wait," Andrew Linhard, 17, said to fellow senior Scott Forster, also 17, who was manning the mouse. They and several classmates kept examining the screen and tried to reconcile two dizzying windows of data - which they hoped were correctly collected from a device hooked up to the computer.
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NEWS
September 1, 1998
Harry F. Stump, 75, a Dutch-born sculptor and World War II resistance fighter who moved to Maine to pursue his psychic abilities, died Friday in Warren, Me.Dorothy Manners Haskell, 95, a columnist who chronicled the lives of Hollywood celebrities, died Aug. 25 in Palm Springs, Calif.Frederick Reines, 80, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist known as the father of neutrino physics for his groundbreaking research on particle physics, died Wednesday in Orange, Calif.Pub Date: 9/01/98LTC
NEWS
By Arin Gencer | arin.gencer@baltsun.com | November 27, 2009
They huddled around the computer in Jeremy Smith's physics classroom during study hall at Hereford High School, scanning columns and columns of numbers. "It's delayed a minute - we have to wait," Andrew Linhard, 17, said to fellow senior Scott Forster, also 17, who was manning the mouse. They and several classmates kept examining the screen and tried to reconcile two dizzying windows of data - which they hoped were correctly collected from a device hooked up to the computer.
NEWS
December 7, 1999
Sam Treiman,74, recognized for his research in particle physics, died of leukemia Nov. 30 in New York. He also was noted for his teaching skills.Among his students was Dr. Steven Weinberg, who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1979 for his work in unifying the weak and electromagnetic forces.Harold Eugene Wertz Jr., 72, who played "Bouncy" in three of the "Our Gang" comedies during the 1930s, died Nov. 21 of complications related to a stroke, said his friend, Robert Satterfield.He appeared in only three of the 221 films: 1932's "Choo Choo!
ENTERTAINMENT
By New York Times | January 3, 1999
Since its birth in 1954, CERN - the acronym for Europe's pre-eminent high-energy particle laboratory near Geneva - has been celebrated for its monumental discoveries in particle physics, its succession of Nobel prizes, its construction of a proton collider that may yield enough energy to discover the elusive Higgs boson, a theoretical particle supposedly responsible for endowing all matter with mass. (Still with us?) It was even the place where the World Wide Web was born.But science marches on - and at CERN, it's now to a decidedly different drummer: the one for the Cernettes, a doo-wop group billed as the world's first particle physics rock band.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | November 27, 2009
They huddled around the computer in Jeremy Smith's physics classroom during study hall at Hereford High School, scanning columns and columns of numbers. "It's delayed a minute - we have to wait," Andrew Linhard, 17, said to fellow senior Scott Forster, also 17, who was manning the mouse. They and several classmates kept examining the screen and tried to reconcile two dizzying windows of data - which they hoped were correctly collected from a device hooked up to the computer.
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | October 25, 1993
Washington. -- If the Superconducting Super Collider remains in the grave to which Congress has just consigned it, national mourning is not in order. Contrary to the extravagant lamentations of its bereaved promoters, the giant atom smasher's demise is not a calamity for the nation, a catastrophe for science or further confirmation of idiocy on Capitol Hill.With the tact characteristic of the brotherhood of physics (few women in that line of work), the originator of the super-collider concept, Nobel Laureate Leon Lederman, has declared: ''It's disheartening that a large number of fairly intelligent people could do such a dumb thing.
NEWS
March 7, 1995
The ancient Greeks were the first to speculate that all matter was made up of invisible, irreducible particles called atoms. They envisioned the atom as a tiny, hard sphere that constituted the smallest possible division of any substance.Yet the existence of atoms wasn't put on a firm scientific basis until the discovery of the periodic table of elements in the 19th century and the realization the atom was composed of still smaller units such as protons, neutrons and electrons. These advances made possible the modern science of chemistry and the dawn of the nuclear age.Now two teams of physicists at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois have taken the Greeks' idea one step further with convincing evidence that the heavier subatomic particles -- protons and neutrons -- are constituted out of still smaller bits of matter called quarks.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | December 28, 1992
After an epic 14-year hunt, scientists think they may have harpooned the Great White Whale of physics -- an elusive particle called the top quark.If so, Johns Hopkins physicist Bruce A. Barnett and his graduate students can claim credit for helping build the high-tech harpoon gun.The top quark is the last of the fundamental building blocks of matter to have its existence confirmed in the laboratory. If the latest findings hold up, the event could become one of the most celebrated in the study of particle physics -- an exotic world so tiny that it can only be reached by mathematics, imagination and instruments that weigh 4 million pounds and produce billions of electron volts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 1, 2005
On an arid, rocky plain unaccountably strewn with shriveled brown beans, a frightening creature, half human, half animal, tears itself to pieces beneath a pitiless azure sky. It is one of the most chilling images of the 20th century, a depiction of the horrors of the Spanish Civil War so gruesome it is rivaled only by the tortured figures of Picasso's Guernica. Salvador Dali, the Spanish surrealist who painted Soft Construction with Boiled Beans (Premonition of Civil War) in 1936, when he was 32 years old, was one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, and also one of its strangest personalities.
NEWS
December 7, 1999
Sam Treiman,74, recognized for his research in particle physics, died of leukemia Nov. 30 in New York. He also was noted for his teaching skills.Among his students was Dr. Steven Weinberg, who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1979 for his work in unifying the weak and electromagnetic forces.Harold Eugene Wertz Jr., 72, who played "Bouncy" in three of the "Our Gang" comedies during the 1930s, died Nov. 21 of complications related to a stroke, said his friend, Robert Satterfield.He appeared in only three of the 221 films: 1932's "Choo Choo!
ENTERTAINMENT
By New York Times | January 3, 1999
Since its birth in 1954, CERN - the acronym for Europe's pre-eminent high-energy particle laboratory near Geneva - has been celebrated for its monumental discoveries in particle physics, its succession of Nobel prizes, its construction of a proton collider that may yield enough energy to discover the elusive Higgs boson, a theoretical particle supposedly responsible for endowing all matter with mass. (Still with us?) It was even the place where the World Wide Web was born.But science marches on - and at CERN, it's now to a decidedly different drummer: the one for the Cernettes, a doo-wop group billed as the world's first particle physics rock band.
NEWS
September 1, 1998
Harry F. Stump, 75, a Dutch-born sculptor and World War II resistance fighter who moved to Maine to pursue his psychic abilities, died Friday in Warren, Me.Dorothy Manners Haskell, 95, a columnist who chronicled the lives of Hollywood celebrities, died Aug. 25 in Palm Springs, Calif.Frederick Reines, 80, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist known as the father of neutrino physics for his groundbreaking research on particle physics, died Wednesday in Orange, Calif.Pub Date: 9/01/98LTC
NEWS
March 7, 1995
The ancient Greeks were the first to speculate that all matter was made up of invisible, irreducible particles called atoms. They envisioned the atom as a tiny, hard sphere that constituted the smallest possible division of any substance.Yet the existence of atoms wasn't put on a firm scientific basis until the discovery of the periodic table of elements in the 19th century and the realization the atom was composed of still smaller units such as protons, neutrons and electrons. These advances made possible the modern science of chemistry and the dawn of the nuclear age.Now two teams of physicists at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois have taken the Greeks' idea one step further with convincing evidence that the heavier subatomic particles -- protons and neutrons -- are constituted out of still smaller bits of matter called quarks.
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | October 25, 1993
Washington. -- If the Superconducting Super Collider remains in the grave to which Congress has just consigned it, national mourning is not in order. Contrary to the extravagant lamentations of its bereaved promoters, the giant atom smasher's demise is not a calamity for the nation, a catastrophe for science or further confirmation of idiocy on Capitol Hill.With the tact characteristic of the brotherhood of physics (few women in that line of work), the originator of the super-collider concept, Nobel Laureate Leon Lederman, has declared: ''It's disheartening that a large number of fairly intelligent people could do such a dumb thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 1, 2005
On an arid, rocky plain unaccountably strewn with shriveled brown beans, a frightening creature, half human, half animal, tears itself to pieces beneath a pitiless azure sky. It is one of the most chilling images of the 20th century, a depiction of the horrors of the Spanish Civil War so gruesome it is rivaled only by the tortured figures of Picasso's Guernica. Salvador Dali, the Spanish surrealist who painted Soft Construction with Boiled Beans (Premonition of Civil War) in 1936, when he was 32 years old, was one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, and also one of its strangest personalities.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | December 28, 1992
After an epic 14-year hunt, scientists think they may have harpooned the Great White Whale of physics -- an elusive particle called the top quark.If so, Johns Hopkins physicist Bruce A. Barnett and his graduate students can claim credit for helping build the high-tech harpoon gun.The top quark is the last of the fundamental building blocks of matter to have its existence confirmed in the laboratory. If the latest findings hold up, the event could become one of the most celebrated in the study of particle physics -- an exotic world so tiny that it can only be reached by mathematics, imagination and instruments that weigh 4 million pounds and produce billions of electron volts.
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